Child & Family Development Child & Family Development

October 13, 2016

Dyslexia Month Series: accommodations for school and home by Jessica DeLing MEd

Posted by: childandfamily

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October is Dyslexia Month! Our team of Educational Specialists are celebrating by sharing their expertise.

Jessica DeLing M.Ed. is an educational diagnostician at Child and Family Development- Midtown.  She shares:

So far, we have discussed the importance of determining if your child has dyslexia via a psychoeducational assessment. Next up is accommodations! 

Students with dyslexia often require, and can greatly benefit from accommodations, in both the academic setting and at home. Individuals diagnosed with dyslexia may not just have difficulties with reading. Dyslexia can impact various skill sets such as spelling, writing, arithmetic, and sequencing.   Based on specific student needs, accommodations may vary. Providing these tools, and teaching the students how to use the accommodations to support their learning, is so important in helping the dyslexic student reach their full academic potential.  

Although there are a variety of accommodations, check out the information and links below to start researching which accommodations might work best for your dyslexic student:

Some example accommodations include: 

  • Allow the student to complete written assignments using Online dictation  or allowing the student to use a computer, will be beneficial.
  • Read aloud test questions. For tests of reading, allow the student to read out loud to his/herself. Consider allowing the student to test and a separate setting as they will likely need more time to complete work.
  • Clarify or simplify written directions.
  • Use visual presentations of verbal material, such as glossaries and word banks across content areas.
  • Provide advanced copies of class notes and/ or completed study guides.
  • Work with fewer items per page/line. Help the student learn how to independently breakdown large assignments into smaller tasks.
  • Allow the student to learn content from a variety of digital media resources including audiobooks, movies, and videos.

Read more about Jessica here

Read more about our educational services here.

Read more about dyslexia on the National Institute of Learning Development website here.