Megan Bevington, occupational therapist, celebrates 4 years at C&FD

Tuesday, Sep 27, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Megan Bevington 

Megan Bevington MS OTR/L is an occupational therapist at the Midtown office. She is celebrating years at Child and Family Development this month.   

Megan enjoys work with children with a variety of diagnoses including but not limited to sensory processing disorder, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), cerebral palsy, developmental delays, handwriting delays, feeding difficulties and other genetic/ chromosomal anomalies, with particular emphasis on neurological and physical disabilities. She is one of our Saebo® trained occupational therapists. 

A colleague shares:  

Megan B is a great OT and co-worker! She has a wonderful personality and I truly enjoy working with her.

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Topics: Megan Bevington, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

What is Occupational Therapy?

Monday, Apr 18, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

 

Occupational therapy is all about the "job of living". 

The primary role of the occupational therapist in pediatrics is to help children play, grow, and develop many of the skills that will enable them to enjoy a satisfying adult life.  OTs do this through the knowledgeable selection and use of everyday activities (occupations) to evaluate and enhance children’s development and competence.  

We help children, teens and young adults with behavioral, developmental, neurological and physical deficits gain skills and learn to function with as much independence as possible.  Therapy visits might focus on helping kids learn to eat, hold a pencil, write letters and words, cut a straight line, get dressed, brush teeth, stay organized and focused in the classroom or on the playground, manage sensory input and their own behaviors, as well as stretch and strengthen their muscles.  In other words, we help children with everyday activities.  

If you notice difficulties in one or more of these areas, an evaluation and treatment may be appropriate:

  • Behavior
  • Developmental Skill Acquisition 
  • Delayed motor or self-care skills
  • Feeding 
  • Motor Planning
  • Motor 
  • Sensory Processing
  • Visual Perception 

Some of our occupational therapy specialty services are:

Click here for more information on the Child and Family Development occupational therapists at our Charlotte and Pineville offices!

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Marion Wilm, Jessica Hoffarth, Melissa Petcu, Abbey Wash, Kati Berlin, Megan Bevington, Courtney Stanley, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, Kim Toomer, Meghan Davidson-Palmer

April is Occupational Therapy Month!

Friday, Apr 1, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 



April is Occupational Therapy Month and we are celebrating with our team.  Visit our Charlotte and Pineville lobbies to add a note of THANKS for the wonderful work they do! 

MIDTOWN

  • Abbey Wash MOT OTR/L
  • Jessica Hoffarth MS OTR/L
  • Megan Bevington MS OTR/L
  • Meghan Dooley MS OTR/L
  • Melissa Petcu MS OTR/L

 

PINEVILLE

  • Courtney Stanley MS OTR/L
  • Kati Berlin MS OTR/L
  • Katie Haywood MS OTR/L
  • Kim Toomer MOT OTR/L
  • Marion Wilm OTR/L C/NDT

 

Click here for more information on the occupational therapists at Child and Family Development!

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist


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Topics: Marion Wilm, Jessica Hoffarth, Melissa Petcu, Abbey Wash, Kati Berlin, Megan Bevington, Courtney Stanley, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, Kim Toomer, Meghan Davidson-Palmer

Making Sense of Sensory Processing: Autism Conference Breakout Session

Monday, Mar 28, 2016 by Child & Family Development

The Autism Spectrum Disorder Conference: A Multidisciplinary Review of Current Research and Interventions is just 5 weeks away!  The agenda includes 3 breakout sessions led by Charlotte professionals, including: Making Sense of Sensory Processing

Three occupational therapists from Child & Family Development will lead this interactive discussion:

  • Megan Bevington MS OTR/L
  • Katie Haywood MS OTR/L
  • Courtney Stanley MS OTR/L

Topics will include:

  • What is sensory processing?
  • Treatment strategies and techniques
  • How skilled Occupational Therapy can help 

Conference Summary: Dr. Gary Mesibov, internationally recognized autism expert, is the main speaker at this day-long conference.  The focus is on understanding the neurological differences that research has identified between people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and typical learners, and then adjusting educational, clinical and community-based programs to more closely match the learning styles and needs of those with ASD. The presentation will describe some of the learning differences that have been identified in people with ASD (referred to as The Culture of Autism) and show how these can be accommodated by making evidence-based appropriate adaptations in how interventions are created and delivered. Emphasis will be on strategies for teaching skills that will be needed to help those with ASD to achieve the highest quality of life possible and also on reviewing new approaches that are on the horizon.

Conference Information & Registration: Charlotte AHEC website 

Read more about Child and Family Development's occupational therapy services here.  

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Topics: Megan Bevington, Courtney Stanley, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD 2016 Autism Spectrum Disorder Conference

Occupational Therapist approved: fine motor holiday gift idea

Friday, Dec 18, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Megan Bevington M.S., OTR/L, occupational therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, is getting ready for the holiday season now!  

She found a book called "99 Fine Motor Ideas for Ages 1 To 5" by Nicolette Roux and other child development experts.  Their description of activities include DIY Toys, Busy Bag ideas for playing on the go, sensory exploration invitations, practical life ideas, early learning activities to introduce colors, letters, math, art & crafts to inspire creativity and seasonal ideas to celebrate the holidays. The online reviews are quite complimentary. 

Megan shares her thoughts here: "This is a great gift for the holidays! It’s like your own personal therapy “How To”. A lot of the activities included within this book are ones we use here in occupational therapy sessions as well. It’s always a good idea to incorporate fine motor development into play, your child won’t even know they’re working…. Isn’t that the point?"

Click here to see the product on Amazon.com.                                                                                  

Read about gifts related to sensory processing difficulties here.  

Our team consists of 9 licensed occupational therapists, rather than assistants or aides.  We are in-network with many insurance plans, including Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield NC, Cigna, Medcost, North Carolina Medicaid, Primary Physician Care and United Health Care.  Our clients also may pay privately and access out-of-network benefits.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Megan Bevington, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Occupational therapist Megan Bevington green lights Zones of Regulation®

Monday, Dec 7, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Megan Bevington, MS OTR/L is an occupational therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development.  She knows a lot about sensory processing difficulties and enjoys helping kids and families learn about strategies to modulate and do well throughout the day. 

Megan uses a program called Zones of Regulation® regularly during occupational therapy sessions and recommends it for home programs.  Here is some information from their website to learn more about how it works: 

Zones of Regulation® is a systematic, cognitive behavior approach used to teach self-regulation by categorizing all the different ways we feel and states of alertness we experience into four concrete zones.  The Zones curriculum provides strategies to teach students to become aware of, an independent in controlling their emotions and impulses, managing their sensory needs and improving their ability to problem solve conflicts. By addressing underlying deficits in emotional and sensory regulation, executive function, and social cognition, the curriculum is designed to help move students toward independent regulation.  The Zones of Regulation incorporates Social Thinking® concepts and numerous visuals to teach students to identify their feelings/level of alertness, understand how their behavior impacts those around them, and learn what tools they can use to manage their feelings and states.  Here is some information from their website: 

The Four Zones:  Our Feelings & States Determine Our Zone

The Red Zone is used to describe extremely heightened states of alertness and intense emotions.  A person may be elated or experiencing anger, rage, explosive behavior, devastation, or terror when in the Red Zone.

The Yellow Zone is also used to describe a heightened state of alertness and elevated emotions; however, one has some control when they are in the Yellow Zone.  A person may be experiencing stress, frustration, anxiety, excitement, silliness, the wiggles, or nervousness when in the Yellow Zone.  

The
Green Zone is used to describe a calm state of alertness. A person may be described as happy, focused, content, or ready to learn when in the Green Zone.  This is the zone where optimal learning occurs.  

The
Blue Zone is used to describe low states of alertness and down feelings, such as when one feels sad, tired, sick, or bored.  

The Zones can be compared to traffic signs.  When given a green light or in the Green Zone, one is “good to go”.  A yellow sign means be aware or take caution, which applies to the Yellow Zone.  A red light or stop sign means stop, and when one is the Red Zone, this often is the case.  The Blue Zone can be compared to the rest area signs where one goes to rest or re-energize.  All of the zones are expected at one time or another, but the curriculum focuses on teaching students how to manage their Zone based on the environment and people around them. For example, when playing on the playground or in an active/competitive game, no one would think twice about one being in the Yellow Zone but that would not be same in the library.
 
Read more about sensory processing here
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Topics: Megan Bevington, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Occupational therapist, Megan Bevington, celebrates 3 years at Child and Family Development

Wednesday, Sep 16, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Megan Bevington, MS OTR/L, marks years at Child and Family Development this month! She is an occupational therapist at the Midtown office.  

Megan says, "Undoubtedly the best thing about C&FD is the team! It’s amazing to have so many professionals with expertise in various areas that contribute to the success of every child that enters our doors. It makes us unique and effective." 

 

Read about Megan's pediatric therapy work here

Happy C&FD Anniversary!

Want to learn more about our team? 

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Topics: Megan Bevington, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Summer fine motor fun with Megan Bevington, occupational therapist

Wednesday, Jul 22, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Megan Bevington, MS OTR/L, an occupational therapist at Child and Family Development, contributed to the Fun in the Sun board in the Midtown lobby with a list of everyday and inexpensive tasks and activities that promote fine motor development and skills, including: 

blog_summer_board

1. Wash the car, wringing the sponges, squeezing the hose trigger and drying off with towels

2.  Water the plants with trigger spray bottles and hose controls 

3.  Play in the dirt and sand (the wetter the better), shoveling, digging and planting 

4.  Rake grass and leaves with a small rake 

5.  Pull weeds or cut them with scissors 

6.  Push and pull objects like a wagon or basket around the yard 

7.  Draw on the sidewalk with chalk

8.  Push seashells into the sand with thumb and index finger to make them disappear 

9.  Cut outdoor materials with scissors such as sticks, leaves, pine straw, then turn it into a work of art on card stock or cardboard

10.  Push golf tees into the lawn using pincer fingers

11.  Squirt water toys onto plants and grass 

12.  Cut resistive materials, such as paper plates, straws, sandpaper and bubble wrap, with scissors

13.  Paint using Q-tips, small sponge cubes or mini marshmallows  

14.  Create objects, like robots and funny shapes, by connecting toothpicks with marshmallows  

15.  Make homemade play dough, goo or slime, helping with pouring, mixing and stirring   

16.  Play finger tug of war with popsicle sticks, using pincer fingers and maintaining an open thumb web space between thumb and index finger that forms an O when holding a pencil

17.  Glue small beans, seeds, pieces of grass/flowers onto card stock to make a design

18.  Use party-favor size water paint sets to make a fun picture

19.  Pick up small stones and pebbles outside using resistive tongs, tweezers or a clothes pin

20.  Use eye droppers to drip different colored water onto paper

21.  Stack, sort and put coins into a container or balance them on a pencil lying on a table

22.  Help in the garage by screwing together nuts and bolts, with supervision of course

23.  Spin a top on the sidewalk or patio 

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Topics: Megan Bevington, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Occupational Therapy review: summertime and sensory processing

Tuesday, Jun 9, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Megan Bevington, MS, OTR/L, an occupational therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, recently reviewed an article about summertime and sensory processing issues. 

This article by Rae Jacobson from Child Mind Institute® offers simple tips on how to help kids stay comfortable in what can be overstimulating outdoor activities, as well as other great ideas on being prepared.  

  • study your child's specific needs-- plan accordingly
  • make a schedule-- and stick to it
  • avoid surprises-- by thinking ahead

Megan especially likes the idea of having a calendar to help kids transition from the structured days of school to an unpredictable summer. She plans to recommend all of the information to many families.  

Megan and the 8 other licensed occupational therapists at Child and Family Development are available to share their expertise. We are in-network with many insurance plans, including Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield NC, Cigna, Medcost, North Carolina Medicaid, Primary Physician Care and United Health Care.  Our clients also may pay privately and access out-of-network benefits.

Read more about sensory processing on our blog

  Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

 

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Topics: Megan Bevington, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Don't Take Our Word For It: OT, PT and Speech

Thursday, May 7, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Discharging a young client so he can pursue other opportunities in the community can be bittersweet for the pediatric therapists at Child and Family Development.  Receiving a note like this from parents makes it a whole lot easier.  

Here is just a portion of the note we received from the mother of a child who was receiving Physical Therapy with Leslie Cordero, Occupational Therapy with Megan Bevington and Speech Therapy with Melinda Bumgardner at the Midtown office: 

...We are so very thankful for each one of you!  Words are not adequate enough to describe the heartfelt thanks to each of you and the staff at C&FD  over these past two years!   From our first moments with Mr. Fisher Price Piggy Bank, to swings, balance beams, bean bags, buckets, puzzles, books, bubbles, Cookie Monster, the scooter board, the pedalo, the ball pit, trampoline, legos, food, eat , more, drink, eat more, drink more,  Go Go, Yo Yo,  and I am not all done yet  LOL, scribbles, laughter, frustration, tears, trials, successes, TGIF for the Listening Program, brushing,  rocks (poop) in the diapers, the I Pad, Mr. Potato Head, balls, peg boards, flash lights, spinners, drums, music, cars, chewy tubes, tunnels,  gears, and for everything else I didn't mention in the past two years,    you have done it all and you have  a special place in our hearts and lives forever!

We thank you for loving  our son, teaching him, and teaching us how to bring out the best in him, in order to maximize his potential and meet his needs.   You have a special place in our hearts and lives forever!   We feel  C&FD has been a good starting point for our family, and now my sweet caterpillar  is ready to spread his butterfly  wings and fly!   Regardless of  all the changes going forward...I will continue to keep you posted of  all his  progress.    

There is a poem I  read  that you may be familiar with, though at the moment I cannot recall the title of the poem or its author.    It is about a boy throwing starfish back into the sea after they washed up on a shore.  An older gentlemen approached  the boy and questioned why he would waste his time doing such a thing, when there  were far to many starfish on the shore dying  than the boy who could rescue them.   He wondered how the boy could possibly make a difference.   As the little boy threw a starfish back into  the water, he told the old man, "I made a difference for this one!"    Thank God for choosing to be a therapist as your profession .  He has a special calling for each of you, and I am thankful that part of it  was fulfilled for our family at this place and time!  Thank you for taking time to throw" our starfish "back in the water!  Your profession and dedication do not go unnoticed.  Continue to reach out to all your "little starfish"and don't ever grow weary, because you will continue to make a difference for that one! 

With heartfelt thanks and gratitude, thank you for touching our hearts and lives FOREVER.  We love you all!... 

Click here to learn more about our multidisciplinary services. 

  

 

                   

 

 

 

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Topics: Megan Bevington, Melinda Schatz, C&FD Testimonials

Occupational Therapist loves calming chairs for people with autism

Tuesday, Jan 13, 2015 by Child & Family Development

autism_snuggle_chair_tl_120514_0098F

Megan Bevington, MS, OTR/L, an occupational therapy team member at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, works regularly with kids with sensory processing difficulties.  Recently, she read this article in the Kansas City Star about some students who invented a chair that provides sensory input and helps to calm a person who is over stimulated by the environment.  

 

Megan says, "I think this is just awesome. I have so many children who really benefit from deep pressure to help then achieve that “just right” state of regulation so that they can function optimally in their environments. To think there are people out there continuing to innovate new concepts for these children with sensory processing delays is really reassuring and comforting. I can’t wait to see what they continue to do with these chairs." 

We think these chairs would be particularly useful for people with autism.  

Read more about sensory processing services here

Megan Bevington and our other licensed occupational therapists are available to share their expertise.  

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

 

 

 

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Topics: Megan Bevington

What should a 6-month-old be eating?

Tuesday, Jan 6, 2015 by Child & Family Development

A good time to start introducing solids for your baby is around 6 months of age. However, keep in mind that breast milk and/or formula is the main source of nutrition for your child until they turn 1-year-old. So,  this time is for exploration, experimentation, and learning for you and baby.  They will make a mess, which is a great sensory experience for them so be ready for a clean up!

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Topics: Allison Parker, Abbey Wash, Megan Bevington, Courtney Stanley, Ann Guild

Child and Family Development celebrates Megan Bevington, Occupational Therapist

Tuesday, Sep 9, 2014 by Child & Family Development

 

Megan Bevington marks 2 years this month! She is an Occupational Therapist at the Midtown  office of Child and Family Development.

Megan is loyal and compassionate-- great traits for a pediatric therapist.  She gets by with prayer and little something sweet-- sometimes at the same time!  

Can you believe she has never seen Gone With The Wind or The Sound Of Music? She must be too busy reading books about helping children.

Happy C&FD Anniversary!

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Topics: Megan Bevington

Megan Bevington, MS OTR/L, occupational therapist completes additional NDT training

Tuesday, Apr 22, 2014 by Child & Family Development

Recently, Megan Bevington, MS, OTR/L, occupational therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, attended a continuing education course for "Blending NDT and Modified CIMT Interventions to Enhance Function for Children with Hemiplegic CP", hosted by the NDTA.  

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Topics: Megan Bevington

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Child & Family Development is a multi-disciplinary pediatric clinic serving the needs of Charlotte area children and their families.

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  • 4012 Park Road, Suite 200
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.332.4834
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  • 10516 Park Road
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.541.9080

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