Learning Disabilities: info from our educators

Thursday, Dec 7, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Reading disorders or learning disabilities, and specifically dyslexia impact approximately 20% of the population. The NC and SC public school systems have resources in special education to identify individuals with learning disabilities however, procedures and guidelines are such that most children are not identified with learning disorders until 2nd or 3rd grade and in order to be identified their delays must be significantly impacting their educational performance. Therefore, many children with mild delays simply “fall through the cracks” as their mild delays turn into moderate and severe delays without appropriate intervention. Research indicates the children make the greatest gains in learning to read in grades K through 2nd. Research has also shown that if the reading gap is not remediated by the 3rd grade, it is very hard to close. Therefore, it is imperative that professionals in the medical field collaborate with parents and educators to help identify individuals with learning disabilities.

Learning Disability sub-types:

  • Dyslexia is a phonological based reading disorder which shows in an “unexpected difficulty” with reading tasks such as fluent word recognition, reading decoding, spelling and likely reading comprehension.
  • Dyscalculia is a mathematics disorder in which functioning in either arithmetic calculation; math concept formation and/or speed of execution are substantially below a student’s expected level for age, ability and educational experience.
  • Dysgraphia is a developmental written expression disorder in which the complex set of motor skills and information processing skills required to produce writing are delayed in handwriting, spelling and the organization of the written word on paper.
  • Nonverbal Learning Disability Is not presently a diagnostic condition but rather refers to a syndrome characterized by significant deficits in motor, visual spatial and social skills resulting from an individual’s difficulty interpreting nonverbal information. 

Pre-academic/Pre-school Warning Signs of Learning Disabilities:

  • Late speech development
  • Late development with learning alphabets letters and sounds (late is considered by 5 to 5 ½ years)
  • Inconsistent development and learning of the alphabet and sounds
  • Poor rhyming skills
  • Avoiding drawing/coloring, pre-writing tasks
  • Weak fine motor skills
  • Late established hand dominance
  • Immature or muddled speech (says aminal for animal)
  • Difficulty with word retrieval (says ummm and thing)
  • Advanced vocabulary in comparison to development of reading skills
  • Late color recognition

Warning signs for school aged children:

  • Oral reading is slow or labored
  • Reads with substitutions, adds words or guesses at words
  • Poor decoding skills (not able to properly “sound out a word”)
  • Poor spelling skills (often individuals with dyslexia will spell words correctly on a spelling test ,but are not able to generalize into other day-to-day writing assignments)
  • Poor fine motor skills, handwriting
  • Trouble with recall or retrieval of math facts, especially quick retrieval
  • Writes or reads letters and/or numbers reversed
  • Doesn't enjoy reading and/or writing

Often, teachers do not pick up on signs of learning disabilities until later grades as letter reversals and poor handwriting are often times viewed as developmental concerns. However, if a parent has any concern it is best to at least speak with an educational specialist and psychologist to determine the need for evaluation. Early intervention is the key.

Click here to read more about educational testing and tutoring services at Child and Family Development. 

Click here for a printable page about learning disabilities.

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Dislecksia: The Movie

Thursday, Dec 7, 2017 by Child & Family Development

The John Crosland School recently held a community wide event to show the documentary, Dislecksia: The Movie. Our very own Mo Froneberger, lead the discussion after the film. According to the Yale Center for Dyslexia & Creativity, Dyslexia affects 20 percent of the population and represents 80–90 percent of all those with learning disabilities. If you have questions about Dyslexia, our educators can help.

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, C&FD Educational Services

Psychoeducational evaluations at Child and Family Development

Thursday, Nov 30, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development psychologists and educators offer comprehensive evaluation services.  

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Topics: Aleksandra Liss, Gretchen Hunter, Chris Vrabel, Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, Brandyn Street, Devon Redmond, C&FD Psychological Services, Shavonda Bean, Ashley Kies, Trisha Dyer, Kelsie Salmen, ed

Academic Technology Supports for Students

Thursday, Nov 9, 2017 by Child & Family Development



Child & Family Development educational specialists determine a student’s learning style and differences, then find ways to support school success. Tutoring can address areas such as reading (dyslexia), mathematics (dyscalculia), written expression (dysgraphia) and related auditory, visual and nonverbal processing difficulties or disorders. Executive functioning and organizational skills are also needed for optimal learning and performance. Often, computer programs and applications are part of a customized treatment plan.

OUR APPROACHES include:

• Audible©, Learning Ally™ and other audiobook reading applications
• Books
• Computer/tablet features and tools
• Dragon Naturally Speaking®
• Keyboarding Without Tears from Learning Without Tears®
• Smartphone features and tools
• Wi-fi Usage
• Program “Mind, Body, Backpack”: strengthen executive functioning skills and apply approaches in a meaningful way.
• Program “Techie-Wanna-Be”: instruction on appropriate applications and programs that support learning.

COST
Individual sessions are offered at $65 per hour. These sessions are not billable to insurance and are non-refundable. Small groups may also be formed, based on interest and shared treatment goals.

CONTACT  
MIDTOWN OFFICE
Jessica DeLing, M.Ed., Educational Specialist 704-372-9652 ext. 123
PINEVILLE OFFICE
Marie Arrington, MAT, Educational Specialist 704-372-9652 ext. 218
Mo Froneberger, MAT, Educational Specialist 704-372-9652 ext. 219

Read more about Technology Supports for Students here.

Read more about our educational services here

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Don't Take Our Word For It! Testing with an Educator is fun!!

Monday, Oct 23, 2017 by Child & Family Development

A community colleague shared a funny story about talking with her pupil after he had completed psychoeducational testing sessions with educator, Mo Froneberger and psychologist, Brandyn Street.

She shares: “A kid that I am tutoring is being tested by Dr. Street and today worked with Mo.  He had fun both times, he said. l had said that today with Mo wouldn't be as much fun as Dr. Street and he said I was wrong!  Once again, thanks for getting it right!"  

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, Brandyn Street, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services, C&FD Testimonials

Orton-Gillingham services at Child & Family Development

Wednesday, Aug 23, 2017 by Child & Family Development


Child and Family Development educational specialists are trained experts in Orton Gillinghama methodology of reading instruction for people with dyslexia developed by a neurologist, an educator and psychologist.  

According to their website, Institute for Multi-Sensory Education, this theory combines multi-sensory techniques along with the structure of the English language. Those items taught include phonemes and morphemes, such as prefixes, suffixes, and roots and common spelling rules.  Multi-sensory education incorporates the three learning pathways, which are: auditory, kinesthetic, and visual. 

Features of Orton Gillingham:

  • an intensive, sequential phonic-based system teaches the basics of word formation before whole meanings.
  • accommodates and utilizes the three learning modalities through which people learn
    • visual
    • auditory
    • kinesthetic
  • flexibility to allow for individual learning style

Click here to read more about Orton Gillingham services.  

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Educators vote YEA in favor of recently passed law about dyslexia: HB 149

Tuesday, Jul 25, 2017 by Child & Family Development

The educators at Child and Family Development vote "YEA" for House Bill 149, which the North Carolina senate has just signed into law!

HB 149 will much needed awareness in the public school for students with dyslexia and learning disabilities as well support our teachers.  

According to the NC Decoding Dyslexia website, HB 149 will:

  • Define dyslexia in the state education code.
  • Ensure that the State Board of Education provide professional development "on the identification of and intervention strategies for students with dyslexia, dyscalculia, or other specific learning disabilities."
  • Require State Board of Education to develop and make available information electronically about dyslexia, educational methodologies, screenings and what is available to support the work with children with dyslexia.
  • Require local boards of education to review the diagnostic tools and screening instruments they have available.

We are happy to support this advancement:

  • Mary "Mo" Fronberger MAT
  • Jessica DeLing M.Ed.
  • Marie Arrington MAT 

Our team offers diagnostic tutoring, academic coaching and other support services.  Most clients have weekly appointments, but intensive and consultative sessions are also available.  Several TREATMENT services are available, including:

  • Academic Coaching
  • College Placement, Preparation and Application Process
  • Educational Therapy
  • End Of Grade (EOG) Preparation 
  • Organizational Skills 
  • School Placement and Transitions 
  • School Project Support
  • Schoolwork/ Homework Help and Planning 
  • Social Skills Support 
  • Summertime Academic Intensives
  • Tutoring 

 

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Mo Froneberger, educator, celebrates 11 years at C&FD  

Monday, Jul 24, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Mary "Mo" Froneberger

Mo Froneberger MAT is an educational specialist at the Pineville office. She is celebrating 11 years at Child and Family Development this month.   

Mo feels blessed and meant to be here.  She shares: 

"I thought I was just looking for a summer job between classroom teaching.  At the time, there was a full-time position open and of course the rest is history." 

Congratulations Mo! 

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, C&FD Educational Services

Educator recommends online IEP tools

Tuesday, Jun 6, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Mo Froneberger MAT is an Educational Specialist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development. Her specialty is psychoeducational assessments that help determine a student's cognitive strengths and weaknesses, as well as learning style and school/ classroom/ homework recommendations.

Recently, she reviewed an online resource from Understood.org that includes many tools for parents to prepare for Individualized Education Plans (IEP):

  • IEP Binder Checklist
  • Parent-School Communication Log
  • IEP Goal Tracker
  • IEP Questions: before and after
  • Printable downloads to managing an IEP

Mo's take: "Summertime is a great time to get organized. These tools are easy to use and will keep things on track throughout and over the years."

Review these tools and more here

Read more about education and tutoring services here.

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, C&FD Educational Services

Learning Disabilities: info from our educators

Tuesday, Apr 25, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Reading disorders or learning disabilities, and specifically dyslexia impact approximately 20% of the population. The NC and SC public school systems have resources in special education to identify individuals with learning disabilities however, procedures and guidelines are such that most children are not identified with learning disorders until 2nd or 3rd grade and in order to be identified their delays must be significantly impacting their educational performance. Therefore, many children with mild delays simply “fall through the cracks” as their mild delays turn into moderate and severe delays without appropriate intervention. Research indicates the children make the greatest gains in learning to read in grades K through 2nd. Research has also shown that if the reading gap is not remediated by the 3rd grade, it is very hard to close. Therefore, it is imperative that professionals in the medical field collaborate with parents and educators to help identify individuals with learning disabilities.

Learning Disability sub-types:

  • Dyslexia is a phonological based reading disorder which shows in an “unexpected difficulty” with reading tasks such as fluent word recognition, reading decoding, spelling and likely reading comprehension.
  • Dyscalculia is a mathematics disorder in which functioning in either arithmetic calculation; math concept formation and/or speed of execution are substantially below a student’s expected level for age, ability and educational experience.
  • Dysgraphia is a developmental written expression disorder in which the complex set of motor skills and information processing skills required to produce writing are delayed in handwriting, spelling and the organization of the written word on paper.
  • Nonverbal Learning Disability Is not presently a diagnostic condition but rather refers to a syndrome characterized by significant deficits in motor, visual spatial and social skills resulting from an individual’s difficulty interpreting nonverbal information. 

Pre-academic/Pre-school Warning Signs of Learning Disabilities:

  • Late speech development
  • Late development with learning alphabets letters and sounds (late is considered by 5 to 5 ½ years)
  • Inconsistent development and learning of the alphabet and sounds
  • Poor rhyming skills
  • Avoiding drawing/coloring, pre-writing tasks
  • Weak fine motor skills
  • Late established hand dominance
  • Immature or muddled speech (says aminal for animal)
  • Difficulty with word retrieval (says ummm and thing)
  • Advanced vocabulary in comparison to development of reading skills
  • Late color recognition

Warning signs for school aged children:

  • Oral reading is slow or labored
  • Reads with substitutions, adds words or guesses at words
  • Poor decoding skills (not able to properly “sound out a word”)
  • Poor spelling skills (often individuals with dyslexia will spell words correctly on a spelling test ,but are not able to generalize into other day-to-day writing assignments)
  • Poor fine motor skills, handwriting
  • Trouble with recall or retrieval of math facts, especially quick retrieval
  • Writes or reads letters and/or numbers reversed
  • Doesn't enjoy reading and/or writing

Often, teachers do not pick up on signs of learning disabilities until later grades as letter reversals and poor handwriting are often times viewed as developmental concerns. However, if a parent has any concern it is best to at least speak with an educational specialist and psychologist to determine the need for evaluation. Early intervention is the key.

Click here to read more about educational testing and tutoring services at Child and Family Development. 

Click here for a printable page about learning disabilities.

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Don't Take Our Word For It! Educator, Mo Froneberger receives touching note from former client

Thursday, Mar 9, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Mary "Mo" Froneberger MAT works at Child and Family Development- Pineville as an Educational Specialist.

Recently, she received a touching message from a former client's mother who is now a high school senior.  Portions include:

  • "He should graduate with a 3.0 GPA." 
  • "Your early intervention with him and your help in teaching me how to advocate on his behalf were priceless." 
  • "I credit you with so much of our son's academic success." 
  • "He has plans to <attend college>, starting this summer."
  • "I hope when you read this you will smile and know how much you helped to shape this child’s future!"
  • "You have made a huge difference in his life and we are forever grateful!"    

Read more about Mo's expertise and approach here.

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Testimonials

Educator, Mo Froneberger expands dyslexia expertise

Monday, Jan 23, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Mary “Mo”  Froneberger, MAT, educational specialist at Child and Family Development- Pineville, completed a webinar by Learning Ally called Spotlight on Dyslexia. The focus was Assistive Technology: Solutions for Increasing Learning Independence and Classroom Participation by Marc Surabian.

Mo learned about how assistive technology allows students with disabilities, particularly learning disabilities, better participate in learning in their academic setting. Mo learned about how apps for computers and tablets can help students who have deficits in reading, math, handwriting and organization.

Mo plans to use this information to help her clients diagnosed with learning disabilities, such as dyslexia, as well as attention disorders including ADHD. She will specifically use the information to make recommendations for assistive technology fort these clients.

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, C&FD Educational Services

School placement help from C&FD Educators

Tuesday, Nov 22, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development Educational Specialists have received schooling and advanced training in administering educational evaluations, interpreting data diagnostically, and developing and implementing educational treatment plans. At minimum, they each hold a master’s degree and have extensive clinical experience developing their skill set. Our team has expertise in the treatment of learning disabilities and academic interventions. They are well connected with the educational resources of our community. Perhaps one of their most unique qualifications is that they are experienced in working collaboratively with schools and are knowledgeable about the rules and regulations that govern services within the school system.

So, as part of psychoeducational assessments or during the course of academic support or tutoring intervention, the Educator may recommend exploring different school settings and particular schools to a family. There are many options to consider:

  • Public Schools: These schools are financed by local, state and federal government funds.  In most cases, they must admit all students who live within the borders of their district.  Charter and magnet schools are relatively new sub types of public schools.
  • Charter Schools: They are independently operated public schools started by parents, teachers, community organizations, and for-profit companies. These schools receive tax dollars, but the sponsoring group may also come up with private funding. Charter schools do not charge tuition. These schools must adhere to the basic curricular requirements of the state but are free from many of the regulations that apply to conventional schools. They are not subject to the scrutiny of school boards or government authorities. Considered cutting edge, charter schools usually challenge standard education practices and sometimes specialize in a particular area, such as technology or the arts, or adopt a basic core-subjects approach. Some charter schools specifically target gifted or high-risk kids. They usually have smaller classes and offer more individual attention than conventional public schools. Online charter schools are now also an option.
  • Magnet Schools: These are free public schools that can be highly competitive and highly selective. They are known for special programs and high academic standards. They may specialize in a particular area, such as science or the arts. Students who apply to these schools may go through a rigorous testing and application process. Some magnet schools have boarding facilities to allow students from other communities to attend. Magnet schools were first launched in the 1970s to help desegregate public school systems by encouraging children to attend schools outside their neighborhoods. Student diversity is still an explicit goal of most magnet schools.
  • Public School Choice Programs:This option frees families from having to attend their assigned neighborhood school. Some districts voluntarily offer school choice. Others are required to provide parents with options when a school is failing to meet the standards set by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.
  • Private Schools: These schools rely on tuition payments and funds from nonpublic sources such as religious organizations, endowments, grants and charitable donations. These schools select from a pool of students who apply for admission. They may be coed or single sex. About a third of the elementary and secondary schools in the United States are private.
  • Independent Schools: These are private, nonprofit schools governed by boards of trustees. Independent schools draw their funds from tuition payments, charitable contributions, and endowments rather than from taxes or church funds. They may be affiliated with a religious institution but cannot receive funds or governance from them.
  • Parochial Schools: These are church-related schools, most commonly owned and operated by Catholic parishes or dioceses but also by Protestant denominations. Hebrew schools may also be termed parochial. Your child doesn't have to be Catholic or Protestant to attend a parochial school, but he/she will still be required to attend religious education classes and prayer services.
  • Propreitary Schools: These schools are private schools run for profit. This is a relatively new category of school. They do not answer to any board of trustees or elected officials, so they claim to be able to respond quickly to the demands of the market. Tuition is comparable to that of private, nonprofit schools.
  • Home Schools: Some families opt to complete academic studies at home.  They are obligated to meet state standards but have flexibility in many areas.

When student changes schools, whether starting a new grade or moving from one setting to another, our Educators can help. They developed a program called Transitions to support the student and make a plan for success. Read more about Transitions here.

Read more about our Educators here.

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Struggling at school? Try our Educational Services.

Wednesday, Nov 16, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

Educational specialists have a unique role at Child & Family Development.  They work closely with psychologists and other developmental therapists to understand the learning styles and needs of school-aged children, adolescents and young adults during psycho-educational evaluations.

We help kids, adolescents and young adults with difficulties, including but not limited to:

  • ADHD and other attention difficulties
  • Dyslexia
  • Dysgraphia
  • Learning Differences and Learning Disabilities
  • Non Verbal Learning Disorder

In addition to psycho-educational evaluations, our team offers diagnostic educational support and tutoring.  Most clients have weekly appointments, but intensive and consultative sessions are also available. Several treatment services are available, including:

  • Academic Coaching
  • College Placement, Preparation and Application Process
  • Educational Therapy
  • End-Of-Grade (EOG) Preparation 
  • Organizational Skills 
  • School Placement and Transitions 
  • School Project Support
  • Schoolwork/ Homework Help and Planning 
  • Social Skills Support 
  • Summertime Academic Intensives
  • Tutoring 
 

Learn more about educational testing and tutoring services here

Contact our office to schedule an Intake with an educator at Child and Family Development. 

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Technology and Learning Disabilities, from a teacher's perspective

Tuesday, Nov 8, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Mo Froneberger MAT, educational specialist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, recently read a great article from Frog Jump Gazette, a publication from Handwriting Without Tears®, about personalized learning for core technology skills. The author shared some great suggestions for parents and teachers including: 

  • What to look for:
    • Find tools that are flexible and promote self-directed learning to help students develop independence and confidence in their abilities.
    • Find grade-level and developmentally appropriate activities that engage children’s sense of curiosity.
    • Select digital programs that enable strong school-to-home connections.
  • How to get started:
    • Assess students before and after each lesson or activity to better understand each child’s needs and skill level 
    • Set the homework/ classroom pace, and stop and review lessons with students before moving on to the next activity
    • Allow more advanced students to skip ahead so they can continue to challenge themselves

This article emphasizes the importance of students developing computer-based skills for independent learning. These skills are critical to all students especially those with learning disabilities. 

The educators at Child and Family Development offer treatment services related to technology including use of audible books, Dragon Naturally Speaking for transcription and many apps that help with learning and executive functioning and organization.   

Read more about how an educator can help here.

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, C&FD Educational Services

Dyslexia Month Series: Evaluating & Diagnosing by Mo Froneberger MAT

Thursday, Oct 6, 2016 by Child & Family Development

October is Dyslexia Month! Our team of Educational Specialists are celebrating by sharing their expertise.

Mary "Mo" Froneberger MAT is an educational diagnostician at Child and Family Development- Pineville.  She shares:

One of my greatest passions is evaluating and helping individuals with dyslexia. It is very important for parents and educators to know about dyslexia as approximately 15-20% of the population experiences symptoms of dyslexia.

Dyslexia is not correlated with physical difficulties with the eyes or ears. Instead it is a language-based processing disorder rooted in deficits in the phonological region of language. The International Dyslexia Association developed this definition in 2002:

“Dyslexia is characterized by difficulties with accurate and / or fluent word recognition and by poor spelling and decoding abilities. These difficulties typically result from a deficit in the phonological component of language that is often unexpected in relation to other cognitive abilities and the provision of effective classroom instruction. Secondary consequences may include problems in reading comprehension and reduced reading experience that can impede growth of vocabulary and background knowledge.”

There are common characteristics and warning signs of dyslexia particularly in school-aged children:

  1. Difficulty learning alphabet letter names and/or sounds
  2. Oral reading is slow or labored
  3. Reads with substitutions, adds words or guesses at words
  4. Poor decoding skills (not able to properly “sound out a word”)
  5. Poor spelling skills (often individuals with dyslexia will spell words correctly on a spelling test, but are not able to generalize into other day-to-day writing assignments)
  6. Poor fine motor skills
  7. Poor handwriting
  8. Trouble with recall or retrieval of math facts, especially quick retrieval
  9. Writes or reads letters and/or numbers reversed
  10. Doesn't enjoy reading
  11. Doesn't enjoy writing

Diagnosis of dyslexia involves psychological-educational testing. It is important that clinicians evaluating for dyslexia have training and experience with this type of learning disability.

Read more about Mo here.

Read more about our educational services here.

Read more about psychoeducational assessments here.

Read more about dyslexia on the National Institute of Learning Development website here.

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, C&FD Educational Services

Good handwriting and broken crayons, ideas from an educator (and a mom)

Monday, Sep 26, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Mo Froneberger MAT, educational specialist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, recently read a great article from Frog Jump Gazette, a publication from Handwriting Without Tears®, about how to support handwriting skills in the classroom. The author shared some great suggestions for early elementary school aged students including: 

  • Provide crayons and pencils that are short or broken. This helps students grasp the pencil appropriately with their fingers.

Mo recalls that the occupational therapists here have a saying: “little hands need little utensils” and realizes that this includes writing tools! 

Read more about how an educator can help here.

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, C&FD Educational Services

Mo Froneberger, educational specialist, celebrates 10 years at C&FD

Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Mary "Mo" Froneberger

Mo Froneberger MAT is an educational specialist at the Pineville office. She is celebrating 10 years at Child and Family Development this month.   

Mo is a North Carolina licensed special education teacher. Over the last decade, her work has focused on diagnosis and treatment of school-aged children with learning disabilities, ADHD,  autism and emotional disorders.  Her passion is diagnosing and treating individuals with dyslexia. She also enjoy helping parents learn more about how to advocate for their children in school, particularly public school settings and including support and assistance with guidelines and processes of school services such as IEPs or 504 plans.

A colleague shares:  

Mo is an ideal educator and coworker.  She is knowledgeable and willing to share her expertise with colleagues and parents.  Her enthusiasm for working with families and children is contagious. I'm always learning something new from Mo. 

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, C&FD Educational Services

managing (or minimizing!) IEP disputes

Wednesday, May 25, 2016 by Child & Family Development

At Child and Family Development, Mary "Mo" Froneberger MAT is one of three Educational Specialists who helps parents navigate the school system including IEPs.   

Recently, Mo reviewed an article from Understood.org about options for resolving an IEP dispute, based the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) gives you several ways to resolve disputes: 

  • Informal Negotiation: Talking with the school during IEP meetings
  • Mediation: A voluntary process with third-party help
  • Due Process Hearing: Starts with formal complaint and ends with decision
  • Civil Lawsuit: Going to court after due process
  • State Complaint: Asking the state to step in
  • Office for Civil Rights: Going to the feds

While she found the suggestions practical and informative, Mo prefers avoiding or minimizing conflict from the beginning.  During consultations and conferences with families, Mo often recommends the following when families are faced with difficulties, knowing it can be difficult to be your both a parent and advocate.

A C&FD educator can also assist you via evaluations, consultations, tutoring and academic coaching.      

Read more about our IEP support services here

Read more about our education team here.  

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, C&FD Educational Services

Education Intensives for Summer

Thursday, May 19, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Make time for learning this summer!

Our Educational Specialists offer Intensive Programs based on grade levels and subject areas. Programs are based on rising grade levels in Fall 2016. 

Kids can benefit from just one program or a series of programs over time. 

Individual or small group intensives are available.

 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS

Kindergarten Readiness: Pre-K and T-K students; Instruction builds pre-academic skills in reading, writing and math, as well as listening.

Math:  Mostly grades 1-6; Instruction is based on a multi-sensory approach to learning grade-level specific math skills that align with the Common Core standards.

Basic Reading: Mostly grades 1-5; Instruction focuses on stimulating and strengthening the underlying processing areas of phonological awareness and memory in order to improve sound awareness, word decoding, spelling, word recognition and reading fluency.

Writing: Mostly grades 1-5; Instruction focuses on helping students organize their thinking while executing a written piece. By creating an awareness of the various types of writing, as well as opportunities to plan and interact with various topics.  Students will learn strategies for improving their overall written expression skills.

Reading Comprehension: Mostly grades 1-5; Instruction focuses on using grade-level appropriate text to improve higher-order thinking skills so students can share main ideas, infer, predict and summarize written and verbal information.

Executive Functioning Skills (Elementary): Grades 3-5; Using research based practices, students will engage in interactive and fun activities that teach and promote age appropriate executive functioning skills.  By creating an awareness of executive skills across various settings and providing opportunities to practice those skills.  Students will learn strategies to support life-long learning.

Executive Functioning Skills (Middle School/High School): Grades 6-12; Students will be supported and encouraged as they learn strategies for strengthening their executive functioning skills.  Using research based practices and interactive lessons, middle and high school students will reflect on their personal learning styles and learn to apply various strategies in a meaningful way. 

CONTACTS

Jessica DeLing, M.Ed., Educational Specialist; jdeling@childandfamilydevelopment.com; 704-332-4834  ext.123

Mary “Mo” Froneberger, MAT, Educational Specialist; mfroneberger@childandfamilydevelopment.com; 704-541-9080  ext. 219

Marie Arrington, MAT, NBCT, Educational Specialist; mpacini@childandfamilydevelopment.com; 704-541-9080 ext. 218    

Read more about our educational services here.  

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

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Child & Family Development is a multi-disciplinary pediatric clinic serving the needs of Charlotte area children and their families.

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Contact

  • MIDTOWN OFFICE
  • 4012 Park Road, Suite 200
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.332.4834
  • PINEVILLE OFFICE
  • 10516 Park Road
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.541.9080

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The information contained in this website is intended to provide general educational information and client education on certain topics only and is not intended to offer healthcare/medical advice. This information should not be considered complete and should not be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice from a licensed healthcare professional. Child and Family Development is not liable or responsible for any advice, course of treatment, diagnosis or any other information or services you obtain through this website. If you have, or suspect you have, a health problem you should never disregard medical advice or delay seeking medical attention because of something you have read on this website. Never rely on information on this website in place of seeking professional medical advice. If you have questions about a medical condition or seek advice, see your healthcare professional immediately.

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Links from our website to other websites are provided as a service to help users find appropriate information. Absolutely no responsibility is taken by Child and Family Development or its employees for the accuracy of the information you may receive from any of the referred links. If you have questions about a medical condition or seek medical advice, contact your healthcare professional.