School placement help from C&FD Educators

Tuesday, Nov 22, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development Educational Specialists have received schooling and advanced training in administering educational evaluations, interpreting data diagnostically, and developing and implementing educational treatment plans. At minimum, they each hold a master’s degree and have extensive clinical experience developing their skill set. Our team has expertise in the treatment of learning disabilities and academic interventions. They are well connected with the educational resources of our community. Perhaps one of their most unique qualifications is that they are experienced in working collaboratively with schools and are knowledgeable about the rules and regulations that govern services within the school system.

So, as part of psychoeducational assessments or during the course of academic support or tutoring intervention, the Educator may recommend exploring different school settings and particular schools to a family. There are many options to consider:

  • Public Schools: These schools are financed by local, state and federal government funds.  In most cases, they must admit all students who live within the borders of their district.  Charter and magnet schools are relatively new sub types of public schools.
  • Charter Schools: They are independently operated public schools started by parents, teachers, community organizations, and for-profit companies. These schools receive tax dollars, but the sponsoring group may also come up with private funding. Charter schools do not charge tuition. These schools must adhere to the basic curricular requirements of the state but are free from many of the regulations that apply to conventional schools. They are not subject to the scrutiny of school boards or government authorities. Considered cutting edge, charter schools usually challenge standard education practices and sometimes specialize in a particular area, such as technology or the arts, or adopt a basic core-subjects approach. Some charter schools specifically target gifted or high-risk kids. They usually have smaller classes and offer more individual attention than conventional public schools. Online charter schools are now also an option.
  • Magnet Schools: These are free public schools that can be highly competitive and highly selective. They are known for special programs and high academic standards. They may specialize in a particular area, such as science or the arts. Students who apply to these schools may go through a rigorous testing and application process. Some magnet schools have boarding facilities to allow students from other communities to attend. Magnet schools were first launched in the 1970s to help desegregate public school systems by encouraging children to attend schools outside their neighborhoods. Student diversity is still an explicit goal of most magnet schools.
  • Public School Choice Programs:This option frees families from having to attend their assigned neighborhood school. Some districts voluntarily offer school choice. Others are required to provide parents with options when a school is failing to meet the standards set by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.
  • Private Schools: These schools rely on tuition payments and funds from nonpublic sources such as religious organizations, endowments, grants and charitable donations. These schools select from a pool of students who apply for admission. They may be coed or single sex. About a third of the elementary and secondary schools in the United States are private.
  • Independent Schools: These are private, nonprofit schools governed by boards of trustees. Independent schools draw their funds from tuition payments, charitable contributions, and endowments rather than from taxes or church funds. They may be affiliated with a religious institution but cannot receive funds or governance from them.
  • Parochial Schools: These are church-related schools, most commonly owned and operated by Catholic parishes or dioceses but also by Protestant denominations. Hebrew schools may also be termed parochial. Your child doesn't have to be Catholic or Protestant to attend a parochial school, but he/she will still be required to attend religious education classes and prayer services.
  • Propreitary Schools: These schools are private schools run for profit. This is a relatively new category of school. They do not answer to any board of trustees or elected officials, so they claim to be able to respond quickly to the demands of the market. Tuition is comparable to that of private, nonprofit schools.
  • Home Schools: Some families opt to complete academic studies at home.  They are obligated to meet state standards but have flexibility in many areas.

When student changes schools, whether starting a new grade or moving from one setting to another, our Educators can help. They developed a program called Transitions to support the student and make a plan for success. Read more about Transitions here.

Read more about our Educators here.

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Struggling at school? Try our Educational Services.

Wednesday, Nov 16, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

Educational specialists have a unique role at Child & Family Development.  They work closely with psychologists and other developmental therapists to understand the learning styles and needs of school-aged children, adolescents and young adults during psycho-educational evaluations.

We help kids, adolescents and young adults with difficulties, including but not limited to:

  • ADHD and other attention difficulties
  • Dyslexia
  • Dysgraphia
  • Learning Differences and Learning Disabilities
  • Non Verbal Learning Disorder

In addition to psycho-educational evaluations, our team offers diagnostic educational support and tutoring.  Most clients have weekly appointments, but intensive and consultative sessions are also available. Several treatment services are available, including:

  • Academic Coaching
  • College Placement, Preparation and Application Process
  • Educational Therapy
  • End-Of-Grade (EOG) Preparation 
  • Organizational Skills 
  • School Placement and Transitions 
  • School Project Support
  • Schoolwork/ Homework Help and Planning 
  • Social Skills Support 
  • Summertime Academic Intensives
  • Tutoring 
 

Learn more about educational testing and tutoring services here

Contact our office to schedule an Intake with an educator at Child and Family Development. 

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Dyslexia Month Series: Orton-Gillingham by Marie Arrington MAT

Thursday, Oct 20, 2016 by Child & Family Development

October is Dyslexia Month! Our team of Educational Specialists are celebrating by sharing their expertise.

Marie Arrington MAT is an educational diagnostician at Child and Family Development- Pineville.  She shares:

So far, we have discussed the importance of determining if your child has dyslexia as well as the accommodations your child will benefit from based on their diagnosis. Now that you have the diagnosis and accommodations in place, it is essential to intervene with a program or curriculum that is specifically targeted towards addressing the delays that children with dyslexia commonly exhibit.

This involves finding a tutor who specializes in working with children with dyslexia. Our educators have training in the Orton-Gillingham (OG) instructional approach. Tutors trained in this approach have the expertise to target the specific areas of weakness that is causing your child to struggle with reading and writing. OG is a multisensory approach that teaches children the foundational skills of reading. It was initially developed to only support children with language-based learning disorders, such as dyslexia. However, over the years, early education teachers have adopted this approach for any student because it encompasses research-based, effective strategies.  Multisensory learning occurs when learning taps into sight (visual), sound (auditory) and touch (kinesthetic). This approach is critical because people process information differently; therefore, information needs to be presented in a variety of ways.

The Orton-Gillingham approach has been used for decades, with much research supporting its efficacy as one of the best ways to teach children how to read. Orton-Gillingham is based on improving phonemic awareness and phonological skills so your child can become a fluent reader. The research gathered by the National Reading Panel in 2000 indicates there are five essential components that must be incorporated in reading instruction.

Read more about Marie here.

Read more about Orton-Gillingham services here

Read more about our educational services here.

Read more about dyslexia on the National Institute of Learning Development website here.

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Topics: Marie Arrington, C&FD Educational Services

Marie Arrington, educational specialist, celebrates 3 years at C&FD

Friday, Jul 22, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Marie Arrington

Marie Arrington MAT is an educational specialist at the Pineville office. She is celebrating years at Child and Family Development this month.   

Marie is a North Carolina licensed special education teacher and a national board certified teacher (NBCT). Her focus areas include, but are not limited to, assessment, math, reading, and written expression disorders, multi-sensory learning styles, the Individual Education Plan (IEP) process, along with the 504 Accommodation Plan process. She has extensive training in the Orton Gillingham (OG) approach to reading and spelling. In addition to OG, she offers individualized tutoring that helps children excel throughout all other academic domains, including preparing students for end-of-grade (EOG) assessments with the Strive for Five program that she created. 

A colleague shares:  

Marie is one of C&FD's greatest assets! Her professionalism is never-failing.  Her thoughtfulness, warmth and skill set allow her to form strong alliances with her colleagues and the families with whom she works.

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Topics: Marie Arrington, C&FD Educational Services

Education Intensives for Summer

Thursday, May 19, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Make time for learning this summer!

Our Educational Specialists offer Intensive Programs based on grade levels and subject areas. Programs are based on rising grade levels in Fall 2016. 

Kids can benefit from just one program or a series of programs over time. 

Individual or small group intensives are available.

 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS

Kindergarten Readiness: Pre-K and T-K students; Instruction builds pre-academic skills in reading, writing and math, as well as listening.

Math:  Mostly grades 1-6; Instruction is based on a multi-sensory approach to learning grade-level specific math skills that align with the Common Core standards.

Basic Reading: Mostly grades 1-5; Instruction focuses on stimulating and strengthening the underlying processing areas of phonological awareness and memory in order to improve sound awareness, word decoding, spelling, word recognition and reading fluency.

Writing: Mostly grades 1-5; Instruction focuses on helping students organize their thinking while executing a written piece. By creating an awareness of the various types of writing, as well as opportunities to plan and interact with various topics.  Students will learn strategies for improving their overall written expression skills.

Reading Comprehension: Mostly grades 1-5; Instruction focuses on using grade-level appropriate text to improve higher-order thinking skills so students can share main ideas, infer, predict and summarize written and verbal information.

Executive Functioning Skills (Elementary): Grades 3-5; Using research based practices, students will engage in interactive and fun activities that teach and promote age appropriate executive functioning skills.  By creating an awareness of executive skills across various settings and providing opportunities to practice those skills.  Students will learn strategies to support life-long learning.

Executive Functioning Skills (Middle School/High School): Grades 6-12; Students will be supported and encouraged as they learn strategies for strengthening their executive functioning skills.  Using research based practices and interactive lessons, middle and high school students will reflect on their personal learning styles and learn to apply various strategies in a meaningful way. 

CONTACTS

Jessica DeLing, M.Ed., Educational Specialist; jdeling@childandfamilydevelopment.com; 704-332-4834  ext.123

Mary “Mo” Froneberger, MAT, Educational Specialist; mfroneberger@childandfamilydevelopment.com; 704-541-9080  ext. 219

Marie Arrington, MAT, NBCT, Educational Specialist; mpacini@childandfamilydevelopment.com; 704-541-9080 ext. 218    

Read more about our educational services here.  

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

National Teachers Day!

Tuesday, May 3, 2016 by Child & Family Development

May 3 is National Teachers Day and we are celebrating our team.  

  • Marie Arrington MAT
  • Jessica DeLing MEd
  • Mary "Mo" Froneberger MAT

Educators help students achieve academic success and become independent, life-long learners. 

Educational specialists have a unique role at Child & Family Development.  They work closely with psychologists and other developmental therapists to understand the learning styles and needs of school-aged children, adolescents and young adults during psycho-educational evaluations.  Click here to read more about psycho-educational assessments.  

Our team offers diagnostic educational therapy.  Most clients have weekly appointments, but intensive and consultative sessions are also available.  Several treatment services are available, including:

  • Academic Coaching
  • College Placement, Preparation and Application Process
  • Educational Therapy
  • End-Of-Grade (EOG) Preparation 
  • Organizational Skills 
  • Orton-Gillingham based services 
  • School Placement and Transitions 
  • School Project Support
  • Schoolwork/ Homework Help and Planning 
  • Social Skills Support 
  • Summertime Academic Intensives
  • Tutoring 

All of our educators hold Masters degrees.  They are experienced diagnosticians and have worked in the public schools.  

We help kids, adolescents and young adults with difficulties, including but not limited to:

  • ADHD and other attention difficulties
  • Dyslexia
  • Dysgraphia
  • Learning Differences and Disabilities
  • Non Verbal Learning Disorder

We provide direction and support in determining and meeting the learning needs of every student, from elementary school to the college years. We assist parents in identifying and addressing initial concerns and then developing comprehensive recommendations to move forward, often including Individualized Education Plan (IEP) development with the public school system. Educators also collaborate with schools and community agencies and offer follow-up meetings as parents proceed with their plans. Services can include direct treatment, assessment, consultation and parent advocacy. 

Click here for more information about the educators at Child and Family Development!

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

"Is my child dyslexic?" from the International Dyslexia Association

Monday, Apr 11, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Our Educators regularly provide resources to students and their families.  The International Dyslexia Association® has a wonderful handout title "Is My Child Dyslexic?" that is available on their website, along with several other fact sheets.  Here are some highlights:  

Common characteristics of dyslexia? People often present with 1-2 of these, not all of them.

ORAL LANGUAGE
  • Examples: late talkers; difficulty with directions; small vocabulary; poor word retrieval
 READING
  • Examples: difficulty learning to read, rhyme and count; transposing order of letters; poor reading comprehension
WRITTEN LANGUAGE
  • Examples: spelling mistakes; difficulty putting ideas on paper 

Other symptoms that occur with dyslexia?

  • difficulty naming colors, objects and letters rapidly and in a sequence
  • weak memory for lists and facts
  • distracted by visual and auditory stimuli

Other learning disabilities?

DYSGRAPHIA
  • related to Handwriting; examples: unsure handedness; poor and slow handwriting; poor fine motor skills
DYSCALCULIA 
  • related to Math; examples: difficulty counting; calculation errors; poor memorization of math facts
ADHD
  • related to Attention; examples: inattention, distractibility; impulsivity; hyperactivity 
DYSPRAXIA
  • related to motor skills; examples: difficulty planning and coordinating body movements
EXECUTIVE FUNCTION
  • related to organization; examples: loses papers; poor sense of time; forgets homework; messy

What special instruction strategies might be helpful?

  • Intensive
  • Explicit
  • Systematic and cumulative
  • Structured
  • Multisensory 

Contact the educational specialists at Child and Family Development in Charlotte or Pineville to learn more about our assessment and tutoring services. Read more here

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Don't Take Our Word For It: Educational Specialist helps family with academic success

Thursday, Mar 10, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Marie (Pacini) Arrington MAT is an Educational Specialist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development.  She works with children, teens and young adults, providing diagnostic evaluations and educational support to students and parents.    

Recently, Marie received a wonderful note just after discharging someone.  The family shared:

"I want you to know you played a huge role in getting <my son> to where he is today.  You’ve been a great teacher and encouragement to him.  You’ve been a guide, support, ear to listen to my frustrations and an encouragement to me too.  You’re great at what you do and I’ve valued your input over the years more than anyone else.  It’s just crazy how many doors were opened along the way, each person we met leading us to someone else, and you being one of those special people.  Thank you just doesn’t seem sufficient, but we so appreciate all that you’ve done for us.  I will miss you but I’m sure we’ll see you again.  I need to work out summer camps, and maybe we’ll do something educational too."

Marie and the other members of the pediatric therapy team are ready to help your student too! 

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Topics: Marie Arrington, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Testimonials

CMS End-Of-Grade (EOG) "Strive for Five" support

Monday, Mar 7, 2016 by Child & Family Development

TheEnd-Of-Grade (EOG) assessmentsare approaching in Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools.  Over the past few years, there have been some changes with the implementation of the Common Core and Read to Achieve.  The level of expectations are on the rise.

The educational specialists at Child and Family Development help students prepare for the EOG's.  All of the educators have worked as teachers and diagnosticians in our public school system. 

Strive For Five is an intensive one-on-one program that reviews the reading and math standards learned over the school year. Preparation techniques, critical study skills and effective test-taking strategies are covered to maximize performance and get the student and parents ready.  It is an intensive program for 3rd – 5th graders preparing to take the End-Of-Grade (EOG) Assessments. 

The goals of the program are to review all standards taught during the school year, learn test-taking strategies, acquire positive life-long study habits and instill confidence in your child and include:

  • Review Common Core reading standards based on grade level
  • Review Common Core math standards based on grade level
  • 5th graders only – Review Common Core Science standards
  • Learn test-taking strategies such as referencing the text and identifying key information
  • Learn ways to manage stress prior to the test day and the day of the test
  • Learn positive study habits (notecards, reading out loud, study guides, etc.)
  • Tips for parents to support their child leading up to the test and ways to support them the days of the testing

Read about the program here.

To get started, call Marie Arrington, MAT, NBCT at (704) 541-9080 ext. 218.

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Topics: Marie Arrington, C&FD Educational Services

Dyslexia and reading: early intervention

Wednesday, Feb 3, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Our Educators heartily agree with this recommendation from Brett Miller, PhD.  Dr. Miller directs the Reading, Writing, and Related Learning Disabilities Program in the Child Development and Behavior Branch of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and oversees research focused on development of reading and written-language abilities for learners across the lifespan. He spoke recently with National Institute of Health's magazine about dyslexia.

Is there a key to helping people with dyslexia?

Early, systematic, and explicit reading instruction, teaching the link between the written word and its specific sounds, is critical for dyslexia. The written word maps directly onto spoken language. So the challenge is to link the sounds of English, for example, to the specific letters of the alphabet.

How can parents help their children?

Since learning begins at home, the best thing parents can do is to talk with their children and read to them every day. Let them soak in what they're hearing and learn how to converse. This is a great opportunity to bond with your children and helps them build their oral vocabulary and learn the structure of language, which are part of the foundation for reading.

What is the goal?

The goal is to build a foundation for reading and that takes lots of time and practice.

When should special instruction begin?

The earlier the better for children who are struggling to read. Some children need more time to learn, while others do better in smaller groups. So parents should build relationships with their children's teachers and school administrators to advocate for the best possible support.  Early intervention reduces long-term problems. Children who are not improving by the fourth or fifth grade may need continued instructional support on foundational skills of reading in later grades.

Educational specialists have a unique role at Child & Family Development.  They work closely with psychologists and other developmental therapists to understand the learning styles and needs of school-aged children, adolescents and young adults during psycho-educational evaluations.  We help kids, adolescents and young adults with difficulties, including but not limited to:

  • ADHD and other attention difficulties
  • Dyslexia
  • Dysgraphia
  • Learning Differences and Disabilities
  • Non-Verbal Learning Disorder

We provide direction and support in determining and meeting the learning needs of every student, from elementary school to the college years. We assist parents in identifying and addressing initial concerns and then developing comprehensive recommendations to move forward, often including Individualized Education Plan (IEP) development with the public school system. Educators also collaborate with schools and community agencies and offer follow-up meetings as parents proceed with their plans. Services can include direct treatment, assessment, consultation and parent advocacy.

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Orton-Gillingham and developmental stages of reading

Tuesday, Jan 19, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

 

Marie Pacini Arrington, MAT and the other educators at Child and Family Development regularly assess and treat children, teens and young adults with concerns about reading.       

Marie is a certified Orton-Gillingham provider for grades K-12.  Orton-Gillingham is a methodology of reading instruction for people with dyslexia developed by a neurologist, an educator/ psychologist.  According to their website, Institute for Multi-Sensory Education, this theory combines multi-sensory techniques along with the structure of the English language. Those items taught include phonemes and morphemes, such as prefixes, suffixes, and roots and common spelling rules.  Multi-sensory education incorporates the three learning pathways, which are: auditory, kinesthetic, and visual. 

A recent article in a professional journal describes Chall's stages of reading development, including: 

1. Pre-reading Birth to Kindergarten: At this stage, young children can listen to stories read to them. Many three year olds pretend to read by mimicking adults flipping through books. By ages four and five, children can point to words and pictures when asked. When children enter Kindergarten many can recite the alphabet, recognize written letters and write their own names.

2. Reading and Decoding Grades 1 and 2: During these early years of school, students gain phonemic awareness—or learn to associate letters with their corresponding sounds. At this level, readers often focus on individual words.

3. Fluency Grades 2 and 3; Children become fluent at recognizing words with less effort. Through repeated readings of familiar stories, children begin to associate printed words with stories they know and understand.

4. Reading for New Learning Grades 4-8; By developing the skills associated with fluency, students can now move on to unfamiliar texts and focus on meaning. In this way, reading develops into a means of gaining new information. Fourth graders typically begin to use these skills across subjects in science, math, history and geography.

5. Develop Multiple Viewpoints High School; These readers have developed to the point where they can appreciate works arguing different points of view. They can also decide how quickly or slowly to read, whether to skim or closely study a text. Ideally, students at this level are reading both for learning and enjoyment.

6. Construction and Reconstruction College and adulthood; Mature readers can read multiple texts and assimilate information to form their own understanding. Perhaps most important of all: readers at this level know what to read versus what not to read as a means of efficiently meeting the goals of their reading.

Marie notes that we are continuing to expand on our reading achievement at all stages of development. We are never done learning and ultimately we are never done with improving our reading skills.

Our 3 Educational Specialists can assist your child in progressing at the appropriate pace and becoming strong readers.  They assist parents in identifying and addressing initial concerns and then developing comprehensive recommendations to move forward, often including Individualized Education Plan (IEP) development with the public school system. Educators also collaborate with schools and community agencies and offer follow-up meetings as parents proceed with their plans. Services can include tutoring, academic coaching, assessment, consultation and parent advocacy.

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Topics: Marie Arrington, C&FD Educational Services

Educator, Marie Pacini Arrington, recommends book about executive functioning and studying

Thursday, Dec 17, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Marie Pacini Arrington MAT, educational specialist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, often references and recommends a book titled Smart but Scattered: The Revolutionary "Executive Skills" Approach to Helping Kids Reach Their Potential, published in 2009 by Peg Dawson and Richard Guare.

The authors describe the book this way: "The latest research in child development shows that many kids who have the brain and heart to succeed lack or lag behind in crucial “executive skills”--the fundamental habits of mind required for getting organized, staying focused, and controlling impulses and emotions. Learn easy-to-follow steps to identify your child’s strengths and weaknesses, use activities and techniques proven to boost specific skills, and problem-solve daily routines. Small changes can add up to big improvements--this empowering book shows how."

Marie agrees that it is an excellent resource for any parent, educator or clinician working with a child who has executive functioning difficulties. During intervention, Marie adapts and customizes the charts from the book to help families establish a variety of daily routines with their children, including:

  • Preparing for tests
  • Managing homework 
  • Study schedules
  • Study strategies

The book is available at many book stores and online.  Click here for a link. 

Contact an educator for help to develop and implement an appropriate plan for your child and home!

 

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Topics: Marie Arrington, C&FD Educational Services

Psychologist & Educator lead workshop at Harris YMCA

Monday, Oct 26, 2015 by Child & Family Development

In just about a month, Child and Family Development is pleased to partner with the Harris YMCA again for another free workshop! Here are the details: 

Topic: Behavior Basics & School Demands

Description: Learn strategies for managing your child’s behavior and get ideas and resources that will make a difference at home right away!

Presenters: Aleksandra Liss PsyD, child psychologist & Marie Pacini MAT NCBT, educational specialist

Date/Time: Thursday, November 12 at 9:30 AM

Place: James J. Harris Branch Family YMCA, 5900 Quail Hollow Road, 28210 

Register: celeste.bailey@ymcacharlotte.org 

 

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Topics: Aleksandra Liss, Marie Arrington, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services

It's time for middle school and high school report cards! Need tutoring?

Monday, Oct 19, 2015 by Child & Family Development

It's close to reports card time for Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, Gaston County Schools and many regional private schools. Sometimes, parents find it can be a challenge to interpret their student's progress on a report card. This school year, you may see some significant changes in your middle school and high school student’s report card.

In October 2014, the North Carolina State Board of Education approved A standard 10 point grading scale. This grading scale will go into effect during the 2015 to 2016 school year. This change means that high school students across North Carolina will be using the same grading system. Students will be in a more competitive position as they apply to in-state and out-of-state schools, as the majority of states use a 10 point grading system.

Under the new system, the grading and point scale is as follows for grades 3-12:

A: 90-100 = 4.0 C: 70-79 = 2.0   F: < 59 = 0.0
B: 80-89 = 3.0 D: 60-69 = 1.0  

 

Grades aside, children and parents know best when something is not quite right.  Reflect on the past 6 months to a year and determine if this has been an ongoing area of concern, or is it something new.

Child and Family Development has 3 highly experienced Educational Specialists.  All have Master's degrees and experience in both teaching and testing in schools.  Also, they are trained in many specialty approaches.    

Mary "Mo" Froneberger, MAT
Jessica DeLing, M.Ed.
Marie Pacini, MAT

They help families interpret a student's status. Then, make a plan for improvement.

Learn more about our tutoring and academic coaching services here.  

Services occur at our two convenient locations in the Charlotte area. Private rooms and educational support materials make these services focused and functional.  Homework and projects may be incorporated into sessions, along with learning and compensatory strategies. 

 

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

report card time= tutoring services in Charlotte

Monday, Sep 28, 2015 by Child & Family Development

It's close to reports card time for Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, Gaston County Schools and many regional private schools. Sometimes, parents find it can be a challenge to interpret their student's progress on a report card.

In grades K-2, it can be particularly hard because oftentimes students are graded by using a numerical system of 1, 2, or 3.  Letter grades and number grades can certainly give information about how a child is progressing. However, it is often more important  to look at the whole picture. For example, if your child is making 1’s in reading in first or second grade, this indicates they are having difficulty working to grade level standards, which is a concern. If your child earns 2’s in reading in first or second grade, gather additional information before becoming overly concerned. Ask for a conference with the teacher to find out exactly what your child is having difficulty with in reading.

Reflect on the past 6 months to a year and determine if this has been an ongoing area of concern, or is it something new.

Child and Family Development has 3 highly experienced Educational Specialists.  All have Master's degrees and experience in both teaching and testing in schools.  Also, they are trained in many specialty approaches.    

Mary "Mo" Froneberger, MAT
Jessica DeLing, M.Ed.
Marie Pacini, MAT

They help families interpret a student's status. Then, make a plan for improvement.

Learn more about our tutoring and academic coaching services here.  

Services occur at our two convenient locations in the Charlotte area. Private rooms and educational support materials make these services focused and functional.  Homework and projects may be incorporated into sessions, along with learning and compensatory strategies. 

 

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Educator, Marie Pacini, examines 5 signs of a nonverbal learning disability

Wednesday, Sep 9, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Marie Pacini MAT is an educational specialist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development. Recently, she reviewed this article from Understand.org about nonverbal learning disabilities.

Marie shares that although "nonverbal learning disabilities" no longer exist as a diagnostic code in the DSM-5, the diagnostic manual used by psychiatrists and psychologists, the characteristics associated with it are present in children. Noticing these characteristics allows a parent or teacher to identify and highlight a child’s strengths and intervene in the areas that may need additional support.  

Determining a child's learning style can be imperative to maintaining typical development and achieving academic potential.  

According to the article, these are common indicators of a nonverbal learning disability: 

  • Talking, but not connecting
  • Asking about things, but not exploring
  • Strong reading and spelling, but poor comprehension
  • Memorizing math answers, but not understanding the concepts behind them 
  • Memorizing information, but not knowing how to share it

Click here for more expanded descriptions of each of these indicators.  

Our educators and psychologists offer psychoeducational assessments that determine a child's strengths and weaknesses, as well as tutoring and counseling services.  

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Topics: Marie Arrington, C&FD Educational Services

Hooray for Homework!

Friday, Aug 28, 2015 by Child & Family Development

 

From the sun and sand of summer to the supplies and schedules for school…Fall is upon us!  For many families, it can be especially challenging to figure out how to fit in homework time.  A few tips will help bring organization to those hectic afternoons:

 ·        Establish an after-school routine so that your child knows what to expect every day.

·        Take the opportunity to learn more about teacher expectations.  Teachers often give tests and projects on certain days of the week.  This information can help students plan their study time in advance so they are not working at the last minute.

·        Plan homework time before dinner.  Children are more positive and focused when they are not tired.

·        Create a designated homework area.  This spot should include a hard work surface, a chair with a supportive back, and good lighting.  Use a nearby drawer or caddy to store materials, such as extra paper and pencils.

·        Have your child mark off each assignment as it is completed.  Pictures can be a fun, visual reminder of what needs to be done.  Young children often enjoy choosing stickers to fill in their charts.  This self-monitoring helps to develop a sense of responsibility and accomplishment. 

·        Pack all materials and get parent signatures at the end of homework time.  This will prevent rushing and frustration on the way out the door in the morning.

·        Develop a menu of rewards to celebrate your child’s success in completing and turning in all assignments for a designated period of time.  These rewards could include a trip for ice cream, a later bedtime on a weekend night, or a fun family outing.

·        If homework takes hours and causes frustration, consult with your child’s teacher to plan strategies that might help. 
 

Our Educators have spent a number of years in both the public and private school settings.  At Child and Family Development, they enjoy working with children who have learning disabilities, dyslexia, and attention deficit disorders.  We can help students with school and homework. 

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Executive Function Coaching

Wednesday, Aug 26, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Mind, Body, Backpack: Executive Function Coaching

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Educator, Marie Pacini, celebrates 2 years at Child and Family Development

Friday, Jul 31, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Marie Pacini, MAT NBCT marks 2 years at Child and Family Development this month! She is a educational specialist at the Pineville office.  

 

She shares: C&FD is a wonderful place to not only work, but to LEARN! Having worked here for two years, I have learned so many things from all of the amazing colleagues I get to work with on a daily basis. There is constant collaboration between all disciplines and I feel fortunate enough to work alongside each of them.

The learning doesn’t stop there though… I have also learned from the children I get to work with. Because every child is unique, it requires me to think and plan for each child’s individual needs, no matter if I work with them only once or I get to see them on a weekly basis.

The saying that a person learns something new everyday is definitely a truth at C&FD! 

 

Happy C&FD Anniversary!

Read more about Marie's Orton-Gillingham training here.  

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Topics: Marie Arrington, C&FD Educational Services

4 tips for summer reading for rising Kindergarten students

Monday, Jun 15, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Reading is important in the lives of all children. Even at a very young age, children benefit from exposure to good books. Summer is a wonderful time to spark an interest in reading and to build early skills as your child prepares to enter kindergarten. 

 

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The following ideas will help you get started:

·        Talk about and point out letters in daily life. Rather than sitting down to teach your child the letters, introduce them as you go about your day. Talk about letters that you see as you are playing, riding in the car, or eating in a restaurant. This activity helps your child to see that letters are all around us.

·        Show children the connection between reading and writing. Introduce writing with the child’s first and last name. You can also have your child help to print a grocery list or write a short letter to a friend.

·        When you go on a trip or to a place that requires waiting, pack books about a topic that is of special interest to your child. Children will listen more attentively and find that they can learn new facts about something that they already love. Talk to them about new words that you encounter. By doing so, children will continue to build a strong vocabulary that will help with reading comprehension as they move through school.

·        Make reading a daily family activity. Show your children that you also enjoy and learn from books. Young children pay close attention to those around them, and they become excited about the things that their family and friends like to do. Have an older sibling read with younger children.       

The three Educators at Child and Family Development can develop a summer reading plan for your kids.  

 

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

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insights is a helpful blog brought to you by Child & Family Development

Child & Family Development is a multi-disciplinary pediatric clinic serving the needs of Charlotte area children and their families.

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