Effective Strategies for Integrating Sensory and Motor Learning.

Tuesday, Feb 20, 2018 by Child & Family Development

Congratulations to Katie Kennedy, DPT and Kati Berlin, MS OTR/L, who recently completed a course on practical and effective strategies for integrating sensory and motor learning. Through this professional development course, these clinicians focused on strengthening their skills in the following areas.

Read More

Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Kati Berlin, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Physical Therapy helps PAIN that doesn't go away in kids and teens

Friday, Dec 29, 2017 by Child & Family Development

PAIN IN CHILDREN AND TEENS

Pain in children and teens is complex and may be difficult to diagnose. In kids, the nervous and musculoskeletal systems are still developing. A child’s perception of pain is different from an adult. Children may be unable to differentiate or describe types of pain (I.e. sharp, dull and intense). Some types of pain are straightforward (i.e. post-injury) and other types require more analysis and research (i.e. pain from migraines, pain following a virus, pain after surgery, fibromyalgia, chronic pain and Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). 

Pain in children and teens is broadly referred to as Amplified Musculoskeletal Pain (AMP). Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is another name for AMP. AMP can impact physical activity, mood, school performance, sleep and many other areas. It is chronic pain.

WHAT IS CHRONIC PAIN?

The simple description is pain that lasts longer than 3 months and interferes with a person’s ability to participate in activities of daily living.  

WHAT IS CRPS/AMP?  

Either is a condition of severe localized pain. It is difficult to diagnose and is usually diagnosed by ruling out other possible conditions or diseases. Its prevalence is probably under identified in children and adolescents. It occurs in girls more often than boys. It involves the lower extremities more often than upper extremities. It can move from one extremity to another.

INDICATORS OF AMP/CRPS:

  • A known cause or event that starts the pain cycle, but not always in children
  • Severe pain with light touch or skin, pain response which is disproportionate to injury or continuous pain
  • Changes to the area affected such as swelling, blood flow, hair growth or skin color
  • No other clear cause of pain or inability to move
  • No obvious nerve damage 

EVIDENCE BASED TREATMENT

Elusive pain disorders can be very upsetting for families. Traditional medical care may fail when there is no designated reason for the pain, customary techniques are not beneficial or medications cannot or should not be sustained over a period of time.

A multidisciplinary approach is often recommended, including:

  • physical therapy
  • occupational therapy
  • psychological intervention
  • Physician-prescribed mild medications

Treatment strategies include:

  • child and caregiver education
  • relearning normal use of the affected body part
  • desensitization
  • strengthening of the affected body part
  • coping skills to manage emotional components such as relaxation and mindfulness
  • mobilizing community resources

Outcomes include:

  • restoration of function
  • pain relief
  • reduced school absenteeism
  • social inclusion, not isolation
  • improved self awareness

HAVE A CONCERN?

Child and Family Development physical therapists, occupational therapists and psychologists can help your child get back to his/her healthy, happy self. You will be amazed at the ability to retrain the brain and body!  Click below to learn more about each of these services:

Click here for a printable page about pain. 

Read More

Topics: Amy Sturkey, Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Gail Fennimore, Katie Eggleston, Blake Templeton

Clumsy or Dyspraxia? Read more from C&FD physical therapists

Monday, Dec 18, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 

Many moms and dads who contact Child & Family Development report that their child is “a little clumsy”.  In many instances, it can be difficult to recognize if this is simply part of development and adjusting to a growing body or an area to be explored more specifically. The explanation may be developmental dyspraxia.

 

The physical therapy team provides this explanation. 

 

Developmental dyspraxia is a motor learning difficulty that can affect planning of movements and coordination as a result of brain messages not being accurately transmitted to the body. 

 

Do you describe a child in these ways?

·         Bumping into things all the time, or accident-prone

·         Inability or difficulty with skipping, jumping rope or climbing

·         Strong but not very coordinated

·         Falling out of chairs, knocking things over or messy

·         Awkward or difficulty walking or running

·         Difficulty playing, participating, or insecurities with sports or games

 

Children with dyspraxia have particular problems learning new motor skills and activities and coordinating the upper and lower limbs of the body. To efficiently move through the environment and learn new skills, the body relies on sensory systems- tactile (touch), vestibular (movement) and proprioceptive (how muscles perceive actions). If these systems are not properly integrated, a child appears clumsy.

 

Some characteristics of developmental dyspraxia are:

·         Awkward gait movement

·         Decreased sense of body awareness

·         Emotional lability, sensitivity or appears distracted

·         Difficulty judging distances

·         Difficulty imitating body positions 

·         Poor balance

·         Poor sequencing of activities

·         Poor short and/or long term memory

·         Slow movement planning and reaction times in both fine motor gross motor 

 

Even if only a few of these characteristics are noted in a child, an evaluation could be the first step to address the issue. While there is no cure for dyspraxia, a trained pediatric occupational therapist or physical therapist can assist the child in learning ways to improve their motor planning abilities and becoming more successful with gross motor learning and performance.

 

Current data notes that 6% of all children ages 5-11 have a developmental coordination disorder. It is important to note that motor difficulties are likely to coexist with several other diagnoses, including:

·         Auditory Processing Disorder

·         Executive Function Disorder

·         Hypotonia

·         Low Birth Weight

·         Sensory Processing Disorder

 

There are treatment options for developmental dyspraxia.  There are several types of praxis (movement) that may be addressed in therapy. These types include: oral, sequential, postural, constructional, and praxis on verbal command. 

 

Research shows that a combination of strength and coordination goals, as well as work on specific functional skills (climbing stairs, skipping) is most effective. A therapist can, through play and exploration of new motor activities, address the affected area(s) of praxis and improve overall motor planning and abilities. 

 

Advanced training and techniques are used in treatment of developmental dyspraxia:

·         E-Stimulation (E-Stim) 

·         Neuro-Developmental Treatment (NDT)™

·         Sensory Integration

·         Total Motion Release (TMR)®

 

Read More

Topics: Amy Sturkey, Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Gail Fennimore, Katie Eggleston, Blake Templeton

Fall Exercise: Physical Therapy Around The House with Katie Eggleston Kennedy DPT

Monday, Oct 30, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston Kennedy DPT, physical therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, emphasizes that we can improve our health and build motor skills not just in a physical therapy session or gym, but in everyday events and activities already happening around the house.

In October, Katie has ideas about autumn exercise options 

The cooler weather is a relief from the sweltering summer temperatures, meaning you can stay outside longer and play without overheating! try these activities in the backyard, park or neighborhood: 

• Tag games- freeze tag, tunnel tag (if you’re tagged, you stand with legs apart and another teammate has to crawl under you to “unfreeze” you!), snake tag (everyone tagged has to join hands and becomes “it” as well!), or Marco Polo on land will all help with overall strength and endurance

• Touch or flag football pick-up games for hand eye coordination, endurance, and agility

• Bike or scooter rides to work on balance and coordination

BONUS: Sneak in gross motor exercise and sensory input by way of fall chores: raking leaves, dragging bagged leaves to the curbside, planting a fall garden, or for the older ones…helping to mow the lawn and move wheelbarrows around when cleaning the yard

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

Read More

Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

C&FD PTs are celebrating National Physical Therapy Month!

Monday, Oct 2, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Our team of 6 physical therapists is celebrating National Physical Therapy Month 2017 with the American Physical Therapy Association!

MIDTOWN OFFICE (Charlotte) PINEVILLE OFFICE

Gail Fennimore PT PCS

Amy Sturkey LPT 

Blake Templeton DPT

Katie Eggleston Kennedy DPT

Erin Krueger DPT ATRIC

Jessica Turchin MPT ATRIC

We provide services to children, teens and young adults with developmental, neurological and congenital impairments.  Services can be habilitative (learning a skill for the first time) or rehabilitative (becoming more proficient at a skill or relearning a skill).  We focus on improving and adapting a child's gross motor abilities.  

If you notice difficulties in one or more of these areas, an evaluation and treatment may be appropriate:

  • Balance
  • Coordination
  • Endurance
  • Flexibility
  • Gait
  • Gross Motor Skill Acquisition
  • Motor Planning
  • Muscle Strength
  • Postural Alignment 
  • Range Of Motion
  • Strength in trunk and legs
  • Surgical Rehabilitation 

All of our therapists are licensed by the state of North Carolina. 

Child and Family Development physical therapists are in-network with many insurance plans, including Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC, Cigna, Medcost, North Carolina Medicaid, Primary Physician Care, South Carolina Medicaid and United Health Care.  Our clients also may pay privately and access out-of-network benefits.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

Read More

Topics: Amy Sturkey, Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Gail Fennimore, Katie Eggleston, Blake Templeton

Apple Picking: Physical Therapy Around The House with Katie Eggleston Kennedy DPT

Friday, Sep 29, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston Kennedy DPT, physical therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, emphasizes that we can improve our health and build motor skills not just in a physical therapy session or gym, but in everyday events and activities already happening around the house.

In September, Katie has ideas about apple picking 

Here are some tips to transform this fun fall activity into an opportunity to sneak in exercise and motor skill building:

  • If there is the option to walk rather than drive in, choose it! You’ll get some strengthening, balance challenges walking over the uneven ground, and endurance.
  • Reaching on tiptoes for those hard to reach apples…you always find the best ones up high!
  • Keep bag/basket on ground to promote squatting to put apples in after picking to work those legs. Wouldn’t want to drop in the apples and bruise them!
  • Carrying their own bag/basket of apples for some upper body strengthening.

 Happy Autumn! 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

Read More

Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Physical Therapy: Backpacks- Around The House with Katie Eggleston DPT

Friday, Aug 18, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston DPT, physical therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, emphasizes that we can improve our health and build motor skills not just in a physical therapy session or gym, but in everyday events and activities already happening around the house.

In August, Katie has ideas about backpacks!  

According to the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), “improper backpack use can cause injury, especially to children with young, growing muscles and joints.”

Good features to look for in a backpack include:

  • Padded straps (TWO!)
  • Padded back
  • Waist belt 

Backpack fit and safety tips:

  • Backpack should sit snugly in the middle of the back, not be sagging down to waist
  • Both straps should be used, on each shoulder. Using just one strap can cause muscle imbalance and injury
  • Waist strap should be fastened to distribute weight of pack evenly through back and pelvis
  • Keep heaviest books closest to the rear of the pack (closest to child’s back)
  • A backpack should weigh only 10-15% of your child's weight

Happy Back To School! 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

Read More

Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Physical Therapy: Backyard Pool Around The House with Katie Eggleston DPT

Thursday, Jul 27, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston DPT, physical therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, emphasizes that we can improve our health and build motor skills not just in a physical therapy session or gym, but in everyday events and activities already happening around the house.

In July, Katie has ideas about the backyard or neighborhood pool!  Try these fun moves while taking a dip:

Pencil Jumps- Start standing up tall with arms overhead. Bring your arms down to your sides as you lower yourself into a squat underwater. Push yourself back up as you bring your arms back up overhead. Start in shallow and work your way up to deeper water.

Crunches- Place legs over the side of the pool so you are lying on your back in the water. Criss-cross arms over chest and sit up as far as you can. Complete up to 20 times. 

Floating on back- Lift tummy up and keep it tight, with body as straight as you can go. Hold for as long as you can!

Duck Walks- In shallow end, walk on heels trying not to fall over!

Running- Play tag with other people or just race across the pool and back. The faster you try to go, the more the water will resist you, making this harder!

Twirling- In shallow or deep area (use flotation device in deeper areas), lay on your back and twirl around so that you are on your belly! Repeat in same direction 10 times and then switch directions.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

Read More

Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Physical Therapy: Beach Time with Katie Eggleston DPT

Thursday, Jun 22, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston DPT, physical therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, emphasizes that we can improve our health and build motor skills not just in a physical therapy session or gym, but in everyday events and activities already happening around the house.

In June, Katie knows your family might be leaving the house and heading to the beach!  Here are some ideas for the sea & sand:

  • Walking in the sand is a great workout for the whole body! Your leg muscles could be working 2-3x harder barefoot in the sand compared to on hard ground. The drier the sand is, the more it moves around when you step on it, giving you a balance workout and causing your foot muscles to adapt at every step.
  • Walking barefoot helps us work on our proprioception, or knowing where our body parts are and how much effort they are using. We have so many nerve endings in our feet that are often dulled to sensation due to wearing socks and shoes, but when we’re barefoot (especially on tiny grains of sand) we can feel so much more!
  • Just like on land, speeding things up can also help…running will also be much harder against the resistance of the sand and the shifting as we bear weight through it.
  • Bonus: Check out your child’s posture and weight bearing while at the beach. Watch their footprints as they walk on damp sand. It will give you an idea of their arch and how pressure is distributed throughout the sole of the foot. The deeper the imprint, the more pressure through that part of the foot!

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

Read More

Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Summer 2017 Aquatic Therapy at the Harris YMCA

Thursday, Jun 8, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development continues pool-based physical therapy at the Harris YMCA!

We have offered aquatic therapy for about 15 years and four physical therapists will be in the water this summer:

Katie Eggleston, DPT
Erin (Harkins) Krueger, DPT, ATRIC
 Jessica Turchin, LPT, ATRIC
Blake Templeton, DPT

Pool therapy is a great complement to a physical therapy or occupational therapy intervention, in addition to regular land based therapies. 

  • The aquatic medium provides a number of unique properties that are almost impossible to replicate on land. 
  • The hydrostatic pressure of the water really helps our pediatric patients with body awareness and sensory integration.  Not to mention the undeniable aid with postural support for not only standing, but also for breathing! 
  • The buoyancy aids in off weighting the body to make coordination of activities much easier, as it can be used to lessen the strength required to perform a movement successfully.  Many people learn to walk first in the water and then on land. 
  • The confidence they have in the water is remarkable.  Imagine seeing a 7 year old motor plan and successfully walk for the first time in the water - now that 10 year old is walking independently on land! 

For the last 7 years, we have partnered with th Harris YMCA in Charlotte near South Park Mall.   The indoor pool has several features that are especially therapeutic including:

  • zero tide entrance, like walking into the ocean
  • whirlpool, with variable resistance and pressure 
  • heated water
  • floating equipment and toys

Click here to read more about the benefits of aquatic therapy.  

Read the C&FD blog

Read More

Topics: Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Katie Eggleston, Blake Templeton

Physical Therapy helps infants with torticollis

Thursday, Jun 1, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development physical therapists loves helping infants diagnosed with torticollis or plagiocephaly. 

Infants experience such rapid gross motor development in the first seven months of life and with just a few tips to new parents, there can be huge improvements in their overall development.

A diagnosis of torticollis means that there is a neck musculature imbalance, and the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) is the muscle involved. Plagiocephaly is usually a secondary diagnosis to torticollis. It is caused by the infant resting heavily on one part of the head which leads to a flattening of the head in that area.

A helmet is usually prescribed to improve head shape, but many of the cases I have treated by conservative measures have improved head shape and a helmet is not necessary.

The SCM is the large neck muscle that runs from the mastoid process (close to the ear), all the way down to the sternum. Its function is to rotate and tilt the head. When the SCM is tight on one side it causes the head to tilt in that direction and rotate to the opposite direction. For example, if the right SCM is tight, the child's head will tilt to the right and rotate to the left. Now, there are exceptions to every rule and sometimes a child's head will tilt and rotate to the same side, but for the most part, torticollis follows the previously mentioned pattern.

The cause of the musculature imbalance could be related to how the child was positioned in the womb, positioning following birth during sleep or resting, and/or if the child is not getting the necessary amount of tummy time. Most of the time, a parent or a pediatrician notice the child's head is flat on one side or on the back or notice a slight tilt of the neck/head in photographs.

The treatment for torticollis is effective. Weekly physical therapy usually takes 6-12 weeks, depending on the severity. There's also a home exercise program of daily stretching. 

Want more info or to schedule an appointment?

Contact our office to schedule a free phone consult with a Child and Family Development physical therapist. 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

 Click here to read more about torticollis on the National Institute of Health website.

Click here and here to read more about tummy time on our blog. 

Click here to register for our June 8 New Take On Tummy Time free seminar.

Read More

Topics: Amy Sturkey, Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Gail Fennimore, Katie Eggleston, Blake Templeton

Physical Therapy: GARDENING Around The House with Katie Eggleston DPT

Tuesday, May 23, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston DPT, physical therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, emphasizes that we can improve our health and build motor skills not just in a physical therapy session or gym, but in everyday events and activities already happening around the house.

In May, Katie has ideas about gardening!  This fun family activity can challenge many gross motor skills as an added bonus! 

Have your kids help out with yardwork by carrying watering cans in the garden, raking leaves and grass or doing a “Spring cleaning” scavenger hunt to sneak in some strengthening, coordination and motor planning exercises such as:

  • “Garden themed” yoga with poses such as tree, waterfall, windmill
  • Wheelbarrow races for arm and core strengthening
  • Playing leapfrog to work on overall strength and coordination
  • Spring animal walks- bunny hops, frog jumps, gallop like a horse

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

Read More

Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Physical Therapy: Around The House Easter Egg Hunts with Katie Eggleston DPT

Tuesday, Apr 11, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston DPT, physical therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, emphasizes that we can improve our health and build motor skills not just in a physical therapy session or gym, but in everyday events and activities already happening around the house.

In April, Katie has ideas about Easter Egg Hunts!  This fun family activity can challenge many gross motor skills as an added bonus! 

  • Squatting to find eggs down low…and then returning to standing without use of hand support on the ground
  • Running to find eggs if your family does a “free for all” race to collect the most eggs
  • Dynamic balance is challenged if the egg hunt is outside on uneven ground
  • Place some eggs up high for children to stand on tiptoes (or even jump!) to retrieve
  • If your egg hunt is indoors, placing some on the staircase to work on leg strength and coordination
  • Environmental awareness for building safety, as your child will be scanning up, down, and all around

Happy Easter!

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

Read More

Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Physical Therapy: March Madness Around-The-House with Katie Eggleston DPT

Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston DPT, physical therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, emphasizes that we can improve our health and build motor skills not just in a physical therapy session or gym, but in everyday events and activities already happening around the house.

In March, Katie suggests her take on “March Madness” (or “March Sadness” if your team didn’t make it to the tourney this year…like hers).

  • Pick-up basketball games! Choose a team to cheer for and start some friendly rivalries in the driveway with “half court” games or even small games like “HORSE” or “Knockout”.
  • Working on “Tourney Training” with agility drills, shuttle runs and ball handling skills is a fun way to build strength and coordination.
  • Pre-game warm up stretching for hamstrings, quads, calves, and trunk, which is good for all ages and any level of gross motor skills.
  • Halftime competitions or “events” such as foot races, cheer competitions, balance games incorporate fitness and motor development.

Who knows, maybe this could lead to a family tradition or become your child’s new favorite time of the year.  Can you tell it is her favorite time of the year1?! MARCH MADNESS!!

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

Read More

Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Physical therapist, Katie Eggleston DPT, celebrates 1 year at C&FD

Friday, Mar 3, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Katie Eggleston!

Katie Eggleston DPT is a physical therapist at Child and Family Development- Pineville.  This month, she celebrates 1 year!  

She is a life long athlete which has impact her professionally and personally:

"I  got into PT after knee surgery following a pole vault injury.  The experience made me want to whip young athletes back into shape for my job too! I am an avid runner and have learned my way around the Charlotte area on two feet." 

Run, Katie, run!

Read More

Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Physical Therapy: Taking Care of Animals Around-The-House with Katie Eggleston DPT

Monday, Feb 20, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston DPT, physical therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, emphasizes that we can improve our health and build motor skills not just in a physical therapy session or gym, but in everyday events and activities already happening around the house. In February, Katie suggests getting kids involved in taking care of pets…supervised of course!

  • As the weather warms up, walking the dog is a great way to sneak in some exercise working on leg strength and cardio-respiratory endurance.
  • Stand on tiptoes or climb a small step stool to feed animals in cages or tanks to build leg strength and balance.
  • For kids of an appropriate age, work on leg strength with squatting  to help scoop cat litter or fill food dishes.
  • Playing catch/fetch outdoors with the family dog: parent throws ball to child to catch who then throws for the dog to chase. This can greatly improve hand eye coordination as well as bilateral coordination for throwing with alternate arm/leg.

As an added bonus, kids will learn about care-taking and responsibility, the bond with animals will deepen, and the parent gets a little chore relief!

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

Read More

Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Physical Therapy: Climbing Stairs Around-The-House with Katie Eggleston DPT

Monday, Jan 30, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston DPT, physical therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, emphasizes that we can improve our health and build motor skills not just in a physical therapy session or gym, but in everyday events and activities already happening around the house. In January, she shares:

Here is a general timeline for mastering stair climbing:

  • Crawling up stairs by 9-12 months
  • Walking up steps placing two feet on each step while holding a rail or parents hand by 18 months
  • Independently walking up stairs with two feet on each step by 24-30 months
  • Walking up or down steps placing one foot on each step while holding a rail by 2 years, 7 months- 3 years
  • Independently walking up or down stairs with one foot on each step by 3 years 

Katie shares that children often go up first- ascent comes before descent!  Parents may see scooting, crawling or sliding down stairs even if they can walk up. Children with access to stairs in their homes were more likely to learn to ascend stairs at a younger age, but all children are equally likely to descend at the same age, regardless of access to the stairs.

Parent/ caregiver involvement is key for safety and encouragement.  To help a child master stair climbing:

  • An adult must always be present for safety.  
  • Baby gates should be installed at the top and bottom of staircases until independent mastery has occurred. Cover any openings (banisters e.g.) to prevent accidents or escapes.
  • Encourage gross motor development of climbing by letting infants crawl over couch cushions on the floor, benches, crates or even parent's legs.
  • When intiitally practicing on stairs, hold both of the child's hands. Progress gradually to one hand hold and one hand on rail, then one hand on rail and one on wall.
  • Start with just a few steps up and down, rather than tackling the whole staircase at once.  This can be intimidating and scary for kids.
  • If a child is unwilling to climb with one hand on the rail and one hand free, giving them a toy to hold in the free hand.  The toy can be motivating and distracting.  
  • Use visual targets on the steps! Print out pictures of feet or put stickers on the steps to indicate the path.  
  • Encourage strengthening of both sides equally. Typically, a child will lead up stairs with their stronger leg and lead down stairs with their weaker leg. Practice with both feet.

Katie recommends a National Institute of Health article titled “How and when infants learn to climb stairs” here.  

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

 

Read More

Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Katie Eggleston DPT attends Kinesiotaping course

Friday, Dec 30, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston DPT, physical therapist at Child and Family Development- Pineville, attended a Kinesiotaping course this month from Summit Professional Education.   

She learned the scientific basis of kinesiology taping. how to identify who will benefit, physical properties and methodology of kinesiology tape versus some other sports tapes, how to safely and effectively apply basic kinesiology taping techniques, taping applications based on client needs and indications and contraindications to kinesiology taping.  She looks forward to an upcoming course on taping techniques for orthopedic, neurological and genetic pediatric disorders. 

Katie expects to incorporate the knowledge and products into sports injury rehab, like sprains, strains and muscle pain. 

She also experienced being taped and has determined what will and will not work for the little ones she evaluates and treats.  

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

Read More

Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Katie Eggleston DPT attends Charlotte mobility and seating conference

Monday, Nov 7, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston DPT, physical therapist at Child and Family Development- Pineville, attended this fall's NuFair by NuMotion.   

She attended various session about mobility, seating, funding and best clinical practices.   Katie helps children, teens and young adults select appropriate equipment choices and will use this knowledge and products to discern the best recommendations.

Session 1: Functional Mobility for Kids

  • Independent mobility can increase a child’s learning ability
  • The impact of intellectual disability on early mobility 
  • Pros/cons of manual vs. power wheelchairs for young children
  • Communicating about mobility equipment and funding sources

Session 2: Pediatric Seating- Clinical and Technical Aspects

  • Medical diagnoses and seating 
  • Primary and secondary equipment supports
  • Materials used for seating components
  • Contoured seating

Session 3: Coding and Reimbursement 

Session 4: Standing Wheelchairs- Applying the Evidence for Best Practice and Functional Outcomes

  • Medical diagnoses that would benefit from standing chairs
  • Research that supports the use of standing chairs
  • Benefits of a standing wheelchair compared to standard wheelchair and stationary stander
  • Medical benefits of passive standing

She also connected with various Charlotte vendors including but were not limited to:

  • Columbia Medical- P Pod positioner and Spirit Car Seat
  • Drive Medical
  • KI Mobility
  • Leggero- adaptive strollers
  • NuMotion
  • Ottobock
  • Permobil
  • Quantum
  • SleepSafe beds
  • Symmetric Designs- Free form Seating
  • Zippie

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

 

Read More

Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Physical Therapy Focus: The Importance of Crawling by Katie Eggleston DPT

Tuesday, Oct 25, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

October is National Physical Therapy Month and we are celebrating with the APTA #choosePT

Each physical therapist on our staff of 6 will share a bit of expertise, including Katie Eggleston DPT!

Katie enjoys evaluating and treating infants and toddlers.  Parents, and even doctors, are sometimes glad to report that a child skipped crawling and is trying to walk earlier than expected. The truth is that crawling first is strongly preferred, since it provides important input to the entire body with long lasting benefits. 

Crawling works on coordinating the two sides of the body also called bilateral coordination.

  • When a baby crawls, it is the first time they are required to coordinate the two sides of their body to move in a different way.  Crawling activates both hemispheres of the brain in a balanced and reciprocal way.  It is important for a baby to learn bilateral coordination at this time, to use the skill in future motor tasks, such as walking, running and stair climbing.
  • The first time that a baby is able to independently move in a forward direction is during crawling.  The eyes must scan the environment and in order to do so, the baby must look across the midline of their body.  This helps to develop hand-eye coordination.

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), children typically begin to crawl between 6-9 months of age.  Physical therapists emphasize the importance of crawling before walking to allow opportunities to develop bilateral coordination. A physical therapist can provide guidance to families with both typically and atypically developing children to ensure developmental milestones are met.   

Learn more about our physical therapists on our website and our blog.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

Read More

Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

follow us

About

insights is a helpful blog brought to you by Child & Family Development

Child & Family Development is a multi-disciplinary pediatric clinic serving the needs of Charlotte area children and their families.

CONTACT US TODAY TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT

Contact

  • MIDTOWN OFFICE
  • 4012 Park Road, Suite 200
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.332.4834
  • PINEVILLE OFFICE
  • 10516 Park Road
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.541.9080

latest news

General
The information contained in this website is intended to provide general educational information and client education on certain topics only and is not intended to offer healthcare/medical advice. This information should not be considered complete and should not be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice from a licensed healthcare professional. Child and Family Development is not liable or responsible for any advice, course of treatment, diagnosis or any other information or services you obtain through this website. If you have, or suspect you have, a health problem you should never disregard medical advice or delay seeking medical attention because of something you have read on this website. Never rely on information on this website in place of seeking professional medical advice. If you have questions about a medical condition or seek advice, see your healthcare professional immediately.

Links
Links from our website to other websites are provided as a service to help users find appropriate information. Absolutely no responsibility is taken by Child and Family Development or its employees for the accuracy of the information you may receive from any of the referred links. If you have questions about a medical condition or seek medical advice, contact your healthcare professional.