Physical Therapy: March Madness Around-The-House with Katie Eggleston DPT

Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston DPT, physical therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, emphasizes that we can improve our health and build motor skills not just in a physical therapy session or gym, but in everyday events and activities already happening around the house.

In March, Katie suggests her take on “March Madness” (or “March Sadness” if your team didn’t make it to the tourney this year…like hers).

  • Pick-up basketball games! Choose a team to cheer for and start some friendly rivalries in the driveway with “half court” games or even small games like “HORSE” or “Knockout”.
  • Working on “Tourney Training” with agility drills, shuttle runs and ball handling skills is a fun way to build strength and coordination.
  • Pre-game warm up stretching for hamstrings, quads, calves, and trunk, which is good for all ages and any level of gross motor skills.
  • Halftime competitions or “events” such as foot races, cheer competitions, balance games incorporate fitness and motor development.

Who knows, maybe this could lead to a family tradition or become your child’s new favorite time of the year.  Can you tell it is her favorite time of the year1?! MARCH MADNESS!!

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Physical therapist, Katie Eggleston DPT, celebrates 1 year at C&FD

Friday, Mar 3, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Katie Eggleston!

Katie Eggleston DPT is a physical therapist at Child and Family Development- Pineville.  This month, she celebrates 1 year!  

She is a life long athlete which has impact her professionally and personally:

"I  got into PT after knee surgery following a pole vault injury.  The experience made me want to whip young athletes back into shape for my job too! I am an avid runner and have learned my way around the Charlotte area on two feet." 

Run, Katie, run!

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Physical Therapy: Taking Care of Animals Around-The-House with Katie Eggleston DPT

Monday, Feb 20, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston DPT, physical therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, emphasizes that we can improve our health and build motor skills not just in a physical therapy session or gym, but in everyday events and activities already happening around the house. In February, Katie suggests getting kids involved in taking care of pets…supervised of course!

  • As the weather warms up, walking the dog is a great way to sneak in some exercise working on leg strength and cardio-respiratory endurance.
  • Stand on tiptoes or climb a small step stool to feed animals in cages or tanks to build leg strength and balance.
  • For kids of an appropriate age, work on leg strength with squatting  to help scoop cat litter or fill food dishes.
  • Playing catch/fetch outdoors with the family dog: parent throws ball to child to catch who then throws for the dog to chase. This can greatly improve hand eye coordination as well as bilateral coordination for throwing with alternate arm/leg.

As an added bonus, kids will learn about care-taking and responsibility, the bond with animals will deepen, and the parent gets a little chore relief!

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Physical Therapy: Climbing Stairs Around-The-House with Katie Eggleston DPT

Monday, Jan 30, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston DPT, physical therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, emphasizes that we can improve our health and build motor skills not just in a physical therapy session or gym, but in everyday events and activities already happening around the house. In January, she shares:

Here is a general timeline for mastering stair climbing:

  • Crawling up stairs by 9-12 months
  • Walking up steps placing two feet on each step while holding a rail or parents hand by 18 months
  • Independently walking up stairs with two feet on each step by 24-30 months
  • Walking up or down steps placing one foot on each step while holding a rail by 2 years, 7 months- 3 years
  • Independently walking up or down stairs with one foot on each step by 3 years 

Katie shares that children often go up first- ascent comes before descent!  Parents may see scooting, crawling or sliding down stairs even if they can walk up. Children with access to stairs in their homes were more likely to learn to ascend stairs at a younger age, but all children are equally likely to descend at the same age, regardless of access to the stairs.

Parent/ caregiver involvement is key for safety and encouragement.  To help a child master stair climbing:

  • An adult must always be present for safety.  
  • Baby gates should be installed at the top and bottom of staircases until independent mastery has occurred. Cover any openings (banisters e.g.) to prevent accidents or escapes.
  • Encourage gross motor development of climbing by letting infants crawl over couch cushions on the floor, benches, crates or even parent's legs.
  • When intiitally practicing on stairs, hold both of the child's hands. Progress gradually to one hand hold and one hand on rail, then one hand on rail and one on wall.
  • Start with just a few steps up and down, rather than tackling the whole staircase at once.  This can be intimidating and scary for kids.
  • If a child is unwilling to climb with one hand on the rail and one hand free, giving them a toy to hold in the free hand.  The toy can be motivating and distracting.  
  • Use visual targets on the steps! Print out pictures of feet or put stickers on the steps to indicate the path.  
  • Encourage strengthening of both sides equally. Typically, a child will lead up stairs with their stronger leg and lead down stairs with their weaker leg. Practice with both feet.

Katie recommends a National Institute of Health article titled “How and when infants learn to climb stairs” here.  

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

 

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Katie Eggleston DPT attends Kinesiotaping course

Friday, Dec 30, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston DPT, physical therapist at Child and Family Development- Pineville, attended a Kinesiotaping course this month from Summit Professional Education.   

She learned the scientific basis of kinesiology taping. how to identify who will benefit, physical properties and methodology of kinesiology tape versus some other sports tapes, how to safely and effectively apply basic kinesiology taping techniques, taping applications based on client needs and indications and contraindications to kinesiology taping.  She looks forward to an upcoming course on taping techniques for orthopedic, neurological and genetic pediatric disorders. 

Katie expects to incorporate the knowledge and products into sports injury rehab, like sprains, strains and muscle pain. 

She also experienced being taped and has determined what will and will not work for the little ones she evaluates and treats.  

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Katie Eggleston DPT attends Charlotte mobility and seating conference

Monday, Nov 7, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston DPT, physical therapist at Child and Family Development- Pineville, attended this fall's NuFair by NuMotion.   

She attended various session about mobility, seating, funding and best clinical practices.   Katie helps children, teens and young adults select appropriate equipment choices and will use this knowledge and products to discern the best recommendations.

Session 1: Functional Mobility for Kids

  • Independent mobility can increase a child’s learning ability
  • The impact of intellectual disability on early mobility 
  • Pros/cons of manual vs. power wheelchairs for young children
  • Communicating about mobility equipment and funding sources

Session 2: Pediatric Seating- Clinical and Technical Aspects

  • Medical diagnoses and seating 
  • Primary and secondary equipment supports
  • Materials used for seating components
  • Contoured seating

Session 3: Coding and Reimbursement 

Session 4: Standing Wheelchairs- Applying the Evidence for Best Practice and Functional Outcomes

  • Medical diagnoses that would benefit from standing chairs
  • Research that supports the use of standing chairs
  • Benefits of a standing wheelchair compared to standard wheelchair and stationary stander
  • Medical benefits of passive standing

She also connected with various Charlotte vendors including but were not limited to:

  • Columbia Medical- P Pod positioner and Spirit Car Seat
  • Drive Medical
  • KI Mobility
  • Leggero- adaptive strollers
  • NuMotion
  • Ottobock
  • Permobil
  • Quantum
  • SleepSafe beds
  • Symmetric Designs- Free form Seating
  • Zippie

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

 

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Physical Therapy Focus: The Importance of Crawling by Katie Eggleston DPT

Tuesday, Oct 25, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

October is National Physical Therapy Month and we are celebrating with the APTA #choosePT

Each physical therapist on our staff of 6 will share a bit of expertise, including Katie Eggleston DPT!

Katie enjoys evaluating and treating infants and toddlers.  Parents, and even doctors, are sometimes glad to report that a child skipped crawling and is trying to walk earlier than expected. The truth is that crawling first is strongly preferred, since it provides important input to the entire body with long lasting benefits. 

Crawling works on coordinating the two sides of the body also called bilateral coordination.

  • When a baby crawls, it is the first time they are required to coordinate the two sides of their body to move in a different way.  Crawling activates both hemispheres of the brain in a balanced and reciprocal way.  It is important for a baby to learn bilateral coordination at this time, to use the skill in future motor tasks, such as walking, running and stair climbing.
  • The first time that a baby is able to independently move in a forward direction is during crawling.  The eyes must scan the environment and in order to do so, the baby must look across the midline of their body.  This helps to develop hand-eye coordination.

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), children typically begin to crawl between 6-9 months of age.  Physical therapists emphasize the importance of crawling before walking to allow opportunities to develop bilateral coordination. A physical therapist can provide guidance to families with both typically and atypically developing children to ensure developmental milestones are met.   

Learn more about our physical therapists on our website and our blog.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Katie Eggleston DPT awaits release of self tying shoe this fall

Tuesday, Oct 11, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston DPT is a physical therapist at at Child and Family Development and works at our Pineville office.  She has been following the story of the Nike self tying shoes for awhile and is eagerly anticipating the contest announcment revealing the first lucky people to own the shoes on October 17. The design is based on the Back To The Future film and the contest is centered around Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research.  

There is a motor under the arch of the shoe and you use push buttons on the sides to tighten or loosen so that the laces adjust to each individual foot. As feet swell or move through the day, you can readjust at a push of a button! The battery charge lasts up to 2 weeks and lights on the back of the shoe help let you know how much power is left before you need to recharge. They’re working to continue to progress the shoe to someday be fully automatic with no buttons to continue to provide adaptive and innovative footwear.

Katie's interest has a clinical and therapeutic slant, of course.  She shares:

"Not sure what size range or price is, but this could be a great product for teens and adults with disabilities to have more independence and normalcy."

Nike's HyperAdapt 1.0 with similar self-tying laces go on sale in late November.

 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

 

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

National Physical Therapy Month #choosePT

Friday, Sep 30, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

October is National Physical Therapy Month and we are celebrating with the APTA #choosePT

Pediatric physical therapy is not just rehabilitation of injuries or therapy for “little adults”. While it certainly includes rehabilitation from sports injuries, post-surgery, broken bones and other conditions, it more commonly addresses “habilitation” rather than “re-habilitation”. That is, we are working with children to develop gross motor skills for the first time, rather than regain skills after a loss.  This “habilitation” often occurs when there is a gross motor delay related to late crawling and late walking.  At times, a delay is present in conjunction with a medical diagnosis, such as cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, mitochondrial disorder and spina bifida, to name just a few.

STAFF:

MIDTOWN OFFICE

Gail Fennimore PT, PCS, C/NDT

Jill Pfund DPT

Amy Sturkey LPT, C/NDT

PINEVILLE OFFICE

Katie Eggleston DPT

Erin Krueger DPT, ATRIC

Jessica Turchin MPT, ATRIC

SPECIALTY SERVICES INCLUDE:

  • Adaptive Equipment Assessment & Management
  • Aquatic Therapy at Harris YMCA
  • Constraint Induced Movement Therapy
  • Craniosacral Therapy (CST)
  • Karate Groups
  • Kinesiotaping® & Strapping
  • Learning To Ride A Bike
  • Neurodevelopmental Treatment™ (NDT)
  • Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES)
  • Pelvic Floor Dysfunction
  • Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation
  • Serial Casting
  • Sports Rehab & Training
  • Total Motion Release® (TMR)

Learn more about our physical therapists on our website and our blog.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Gail Fennimore, Katie Eggleston

Summer 2016 Aquatic Therapy at the Harris YMCA

Wednesday, Jun 8, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development continues pool-based physical therapy at the Harris YMCA!

We have offered aquatic therapy for more than 10 years and three physical therapists will be in the water this summer:

Erin (Harkins) Krueger, DPT, ATRIC
Katie Eggleston, DPT
 Jessica Turchin, LPT, ATRIC (upon her return from leave)

Pool therapy is a great complement to a physical therapy or occupational therapy intervention, in addition to regular land based therapies. 

  • The aquatic medium provides a number of unique properties that are almost impossible to replicate on land. 
  • The hydrostatic pressure of the water really helps our pediatric patients with body awareness and sensory integration.  Not to mention the undeniable aid with postural support for not only standing, but also for breathing! 
  • The buoyancy aids in off weighting the body to make coordination of activities much easier, as it can be used to lessen the strength required to perform a movement successfully.  Many people learn to walk first in the water and then on land. 
  • The confidence they have in the water is remarkable.  Imagine seeing a 7 year old motor plan and successfully walk for the first time in the water - now that 10 year old is walking independently on land! 

For the last 6 years, we have partnered with th Harris YMCA in Charlotte near South Park Mall.   The indoor pool has several features that are especially therapeutic including:

  • zero tide entrance, like walking into the ocean
  • whirlpool, with variable resistance and pressure 
  • heated water
  • floating equipment and toys

Click here to read more about the benefits of aquatic therapy.  

Read the C&FD blog

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Topics: Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Katie Eggleston

Child and Family Development welcomes physical therapist, Katie Eggleston

Friday, Mar 11, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston DPT, joined the Child and Family Development team this week.     

Katie is a licensed physical therapist with experience with developmental disabilities and orthopedics.  She fell in love with pediatric therapy while working in a special needs preschool.  Katie strives to provide the best possible care to every client while furthering my knowledge with multidisciplinary collaboration, continuing education and current research.

She works at the Pineville office.

Welcome Katie!  

Read more about our physical therapy services here.     

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

 

 

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

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Child & Family Development is a multi-disciplinary pediatric clinic serving the needs of Charlotte area children and their families.

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  • MIDTOWN OFFICE
  • 4012 Park Road, Suite 200
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.332.4834
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  • 10516 Park Road
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.541.9080

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