Occupational therapist, Jessica Hoffarth learns about RMTi

Tuesday, Feb 7, 2017 by Child & Family Development

The happy baby roll, maybe you've heard of it in yoga class or watched your own little one enjoy this curled up body position.  There is science behind this joy!

Jessica Hoffarth MS OTR/L, occupational therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, and some other C&FD pediatric therapists are learning all about it in their continuing education work with Rhythmic Movement Training International (RMTi)RMTI is a movement based, primitive (infant or neo-natal) reflex integration program that uses developmental movements, gentle isometric pressure and self-awareness to rebuild the foundations necessary to help overcome learning, sensory, emotional and behavioral challenges for children and adults. 

RMTi is based on the work of Kerstin Linde, a Swedish movement training specialist, who developed movements based on her observations of how infants are meant to move.  The movements are based on replicating the movements that infants naturally make.

Watch this video of a school aged child doing the happy baby roll here

Jessica is eager to continue her training and incorporate these techniques into occupational therapy sessions.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Jessica Hoffarth, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Occupational therapist, Jessica Hoffarth, celebrates 6 years at C&FD

Wednesday, Jan 18, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Jessica Hoffarth!

Jessica Hoffarth MS OTR/L is an occupational therapist at Child and Family Development- Midtown.  This month, she celebrates 6 years!  

She shares this tidbit:

"I chose to become an OT because it is the only profession I knew that would allow me the opportunity and skill to be able to help a person excel in every aspect of their life. 

One weird thing I love about my job is socks.  I love to wear fun and funky socks and my feet are perpetually cold.  So, it's a win-win!"

What a fun fact!

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Topics: Jessica Hoffarth, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Notetaking by hand or laptop, an occupational therapy article review

Tuesday, Jan 10, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 

Jessica Hoffarth MS OTR/L is an occupational therapist at Child and Family Development- Midtown office. 

As one of our handwriting experts, she is constantly reviewing literature to stay abreast on clinical and developmental topics.

She found yet another article about the benefits of note-taking by hand versus laptop computer, posted on the NPR website.

In the study published in Psychological Science, Pam A. Mueller of Princeton University and Daniel M. Oppenheimer of the University of California, Los Angeles sought to test how note-taking by hand or by computer affects learning. They explain the differences between these two note-taking methods, along with advantages and disadvantages of each.

Mueller and Oppenheimer cited that note-taking can be categorized two ways: generative and nongenerative. Generative note-taking pertains to summarizing and paraphrasing while nongenerative note-taking involves copying something verbatim.  There are two hypotheses to why note-taking is beneficial in the first place. The first idea is called the encoding hypothesis, which says that when a person is taking notes, "the processing that occurs" will improve learning and retention. The second, called the external-storage hypothesis, is that you learn by being able to look back at your notes, or even the notes of other people.

Read full article here

  Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Jessica Hoffarth, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

My child won't sit still! Occupational Therapy can help.

Monday, Dec 5, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Jessica Hoffarth MS OTR/L is an occupational therapist at Child and Family Development- Midtown office. 

She found this great list of twenty-two reasons why a child can't sit still on pediastaff.com, compiled by Loren Shales OT. While these ideas might seem unrelated to actual sitting, Jessica recognizes that the topics are worth exploring to determine what might be contributing to behavior, motor abilities as well as general health and developmental skills.

In particular, she notices in her own pediatric clients that body systems difficulties (respiratory, neuromuscular, sensory processing, etc.) may manifest in unexpected ways, including the "simple" task of sitting in a chair.

  1. not getting enough exercise
  2. poor postural stability, low muscle tone, and/ or weak trunk and spine
  3. chair/desk does not fit
  4. tactile defensiveness
  5. sitting with back exposed
  6. auditory defensiveness
  7. poor breather
  8. undetected visual problems
  9. poorly functioning inner ear 
  10. immature nervous system 
  11. poorly functioning metabolic processes 
  12. not getting enough sleep
  13. too young or too immature for the task/ position 
  14. expectations of the setting (i.e. classroom, church) are too much and the child feels lost, inadequate and confused
  15. basic needs: may be hungry, thirsty, tired, or need a bathroom
  16. over scheduled
  17. too much screen time
  18. caregivers have too much screen time
  19. difficulties at home with or between parents and siblings
  20. doesn't know to respond to adult redirection
  21. expected to sit for too long
  22. boredom 

Read the full article with detailed explanations here

Learn more about how occupational therapy can help here.

Contact our office to schedule a free phone call with our occupational therapists.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Jessica Hoffarth, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Body Sock wrap-up from an occupational therapist

Monday, Nov 21, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Body socks are a fun activity used regularly in occupational therapy.  They are a long-time favorite of occupational therapist Jessica Hoffarth MS OTR/L from Child and Family Development- Midtown office. 

She found this useful article on Growing Hands On Kids that explains the "WHAT" and "HOW" of body socks for both home and classroom use. According to the author:

  • WHAT: For children who crave sensory input, particularly proprioceptive and vestibular input, the sensory body sock is a fun and different way to get this input. Sensory body socks are very stretchy and provide resistance when you move in them. This provides deep pressure through the joints (proprioceptive input) and when you move around in different ways, this provides the vestibular input (balance and movement in space).
  • HOW: Pop Game, Rolling, Bunny Hop Race, Alphabet Game, Quiet Time; There are countless ways to use a body sock!

Jessica adds these ideas:

  • Be mindful when your child is walking around in it that it can be very slippery on hard floors. 
  • In addition to a body sock for quiet time, use deep pressure for calming kids when they are upset, especially for sensory seekers.  I tell a child to hug themselves as hard as he can, to squeeze his hands into fists, or intertwine his fingers and squeeze as hard as he can.  Pulling a body sock tightly around you (to an individual's comfort level) can help make that hug even more soothing. 
  • If you don't have a body sock, try curling up inside of a jersey knit pillow case.  I recommend reinforcing the seams or adding some Velcro to the opening to help it close partially, but this is a good option for an at home version, even with the pillow in it if the child can fit and is properly supervised. 

Learn more about occupational therapy and sensory processing here.

Read the full article here.

Contact our office to schedule a free phone call with our occupational therapists.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Jessica Hoffarth, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

C&FD Occupational therapists attend mentorship course

Tuesday, Sep 6, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Occupational therapists, Jessica Hoffarth MS OTR/L and Marion Wilm OTR/L C/NDT, recently completed the Fieldwork Educator Training Day at CPCC in Charlotte.  

The course provided Child and Family Development with additional insights on how to make fieldwork successful for both a occupational therapy student and an OT supervisor. 

We welcome partnerships with North Carolina schools and other regional programs to share the expertise of our 10 occupational therapists.

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Topics: Marion Wilm, Jessica Hoffarth, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Don't Take Our Word For It: Occupational Therapist Pomp & Circumstance

Wednesday, Jul 20, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Jessica Hoffarth, MS, OTR/L is an occupational therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development.  

Earlier this summer, a discharged client shared this adorable photo and message about their son:   

"Look who's graduating from preschool! He is doing great! He only receives speech therapy at school and no longer qualifies for OT! He's writing and going to a regular kinder class. Thank you for giving him such a wonderful foundation when he was a toddler. I think he was about 20 months old when he started OT? You were a huge part of his success. He has come such a long way from running around in circles and not talking."

"He has surpassed every goal that has been set for him and we are so proud of him. Now we just need to work on teaching him to tie his shoes! I guess that will be our summer project. Ha!"

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Jessica Hoffarth, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Testimonials

What is Occupational Therapy?

Monday, Apr 18, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

 

Occupational therapy is all about the "job of living". 

The primary role of the occupational therapist in pediatrics is to help children play, grow, and develop many of the skills that will enable them to enjoy a satisfying adult life.  OTs do this through the knowledgeable selection and use of everyday activities (occupations) to evaluate and enhance children’s development and competence.  

We help children, teens and young adults with behavioral, developmental, neurological and physical deficits gain skills and learn to function with as much independence as possible.  Therapy visits might focus on helping kids learn to eat, hold a pencil, write letters and words, cut a straight line, get dressed, brush teeth, stay organized and focused in the classroom or on the playground, manage sensory input and their own behaviors, as well as stretch and strengthen their muscles.  In other words, we help children with everyday activities.  

If you notice difficulties in one or more of these areas, an evaluation and treatment may be appropriate:

  • Behavior
  • Developmental Skill Acquisition 
  • Delayed motor or self-care skills
  • Feeding 
  • Motor Planning
  • Motor 
  • Sensory Processing
  • Visual Perception 

Some of our occupational therapy specialty services are:

Click here for more information on the Child and Family Development occupational therapists at our Charlotte and Pineville offices!

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Marion Wilm, Jessica Hoffarth, Melissa Petcu, Abbey Wash, Kati Berlin, Megan Bevington, Courtney Stanley, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, Kim Toomer, Meghan Davidson-Palmer

April is Occupational Therapy Month!

Friday, Apr 1, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 



April is Occupational Therapy Month and we are celebrating with our team.  Visit our Charlotte and Pineville lobbies to add a note of THANKS for the wonderful work they do! 

MIDTOWN

  • Abbey Wash MOT OTR/L
  • Jessica Hoffarth MS OTR/L
  • Megan Bevington MS OTR/L
  • Meghan Dooley MS OTR/L
  • Melissa Petcu MS OTR/L

 

PINEVILLE

  • Courtney Stanley MS OTR/L
  • Kati Berlin MS OTR/L
  • Katie Haywood MS OTR/L
  • Kim Toomer MOT OTR/L
  • Marion Wilm OTR/L C/NDT

 

Click here for more information on the occupational therapists at Child and Family Development!

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist


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Topics: Marion Wilm, Jessica Hoffarth, Melissa Petcu, Abbey Wash, Kati Berlin, Megan Bevington, Courtney Stanley, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, Kim Toomer, Meghan Davidson-Palmer

Child and Family Development celebrates 5 years with occupational therapist, Jessica Hoffarth

Monday, Jan 18, 2016 by Child & Family Development

  Happy C&FD Anniversary to Jessica Hoffarth, MS OTR/L 

Jessica Hoffarth is an occupational therapist at the Midtown office and is celebrating five years at Child and Family Development this month. 

Her specialties include Cranio-Sacral Treatment, Hand Therapy, Kinesiotaping, Neuro-Developmental Treatment™ (NDT), Pediatric Feeding and Swallowing Disorders, Saebo Arm Training Program®Sensory Integration (SI), Therapeutic Ultrasound and Electrical Stimulation and Total Motion Release® (TMR).     

A fellow OT shares: 

Jessica Hoffarth is one smart cookie!  She is dedicated to research and evidence based practice which leads to better outcomes for her patients.  As an excellent problem solver, she really knows how to look at a problem, figure out the cause and address it.  That’s essential in this job, where we frequently see children that can’t be “figured out”!

She is an awesome part of our multidisciplinary team! 

 

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Topics: Jessica Hoffarth, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Occupational therapist, Jessica Hoffarth recommends free download

Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Jessica Hoffarth MS OTR/L, occupational therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, likes this free download from Understood,  an organization dedicated to supporting parents of the one in five children with learning and attention issues. The author, Amanda Morin, recently posted a series of worksheets that focus on one's abilities.  

Ms. Morin shares that when your child has learning and attention issues, you may sometimes be so focused on what your child needs to improve that it can be hard to see strengths.  This activity is a cool and and crafty way to identify your child’s many strengths and connect them in a paper chain.

Jessica loves the worksheet that identifies strengths.  She shares:

I talk with parents here a lot about how it’s just hard as a parent to step back and look at your child and instead of thinking “I know you are capable of this, why are you just not doing it?” (adult is focused on the task) we need to think “Okay, you are capable, so why isn’t this working for you right now?” (seeing that the child is focused on something besides the task). 

These days, we are so busy in our day to day lives that it’s very easy to get caught up in getting everything done, accomplished, and learned; and it’s easy to miss really seeing the little people we are raising.  This activity helps us as parents be able to focus on our little people and celebrate them for who they are, not just what they have achieved that we can measure.  It helps us see them how they see themselves, that’s extremely important; it’s where you find the answer to “you’re capable, why isn’t this working for you today?” (it helps us know what they’re actually focused on and feeling and thinking about).  It’s about how they feel and how they see things.  So any activity that helps us to see that in our kids is great.

Click here for the download and more information. 

An occupational therapy evaluation will provide standardized and normed data that highlight a child's strengths and weaknesses.  Call us to get started with a free phone intake. 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Jessica Hoffarth, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

craniosacral therapy with C&FD occupational therapists and physical therapist

Tuesday, Dec 1, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Craniosacral Therapy (CST) is a gentle hands-on treatment technique utilizing the bones, soft tissues, and fluids surrounding the cranium, spinal column, and sacrum, along with the fascial diaphragms in the body.  The goal of CST is to encourage the self-healing properties within the body and reduce restrictions in fascial movement and the flow of cerebrospinal fluid.  Based on an understanding of neuroscience principles, the membranes of the fascial and craniosacral systems can undergo palpable, sustained change. 

As the body changes, the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) changes its rate, rhythm, symmetry and amplitude.  CSF is the filtrate of the arterial blood, which supplies the brain and central nervous system with nutrition, energy and a watery environment in which brain cells and organs can live and function.  

Therapeutic benefits can include:

  • Improved body alignment and function
  • Improved cranial alignment
  • Reduced pain
  • Improved digestion
  • Improved respiration
  • Movement from heightened sympathetic state to a calmer parasympathetic state
  • Increased focus
  • Improved body awareness

People with these conditions and others may benefit from CST:

  • Torticollis/ Plagiocephaly
  • Recurrent ear infections
  • Feeding difficulties
  • Colic and digestive issues
  • Poor attention
  • Reduced impulse control
  • Sleep difficulties
  • Cerebral Palsy
  • Spina Bifida
  • Pain
  • Neurodevelopmental difficulties
  • Balance and coordination disorders
  • Sensory processing disorders

Three members of the Child and Family Development team are trained in CST:

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY                          PHYSICAL THERAPY

Jessica Hoffarth, MS OTR/L                        Jessica Turchin, MPT ATRIC

Marion Wilm, OTR/L C/NDT

Read more about CST on our blog here.

Contact our office to schedule a free Intake with a CST-trained therapist.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist     Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: Jessica Turchin, Marion Wilm, Jessica Hoffarth, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Don't Take Our Word For It: OT led to "the best outcome he has seen" per doctor

Wednesday, Oct 21, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Jessica Hoffarth, MS, OTR/L is an Occupational Therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development.  

Jessica is always thrilled when her clients make progress.  One boy with a brachial plexus injury has made great improvements in regular occupational therapy,  

Every year, his case is reviewed by a team of specialists.  Recently, the boy's mother shared that the doctors noted that the progress with elbow movement and surgical outcome was “one of the best they’ve ever seen”.  

Both the family and Jessica are pleased with this news and motivated to continue their work.  

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

 

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Topics: Jessica Hoffarth, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Testimonials

OT and PT including craniosacral therapy

Thursday, Sep 24, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Recently two occupational therapists and physical therapist from the Pineville office of Child and Family Development completed a craniosacral therapy continuing education course.   

Jessica Turchin, MPT, ATRIC, Jessica Hoffarth, MS, OTR/L and Marion Wilm, OTR/L have already incorporated this technique into their pediatric therapy work.  

Sheryl McGavin is a Charlotte-based occupational therapist whose has an expertise in this area and offers services and courses to others.  

Sheryl's website states, "craniosacral therapy (CST), and the somatoemotional process, addresses the body as well as the emotions and considers the individual with regard for his or her unique situation. CST treatment principles recognize how all parts of the body and the person are interrelated, and how structure and function affect each other. The innate intelligence of the body is respected and treatment focuses on releasing blocks, tensions or restrictions that may inhibit the body's self healing abilities. The subtle, rhythmic motion of the craniosacral system (the membranes and fluids surrounding the brain and spinal cord) is palpated to locate the origins of symptoms and light touch is used to work with the structures involved. The gentle nature of this work makes it accessible to people of all ages and almost all conditions. 

CST can be beneficial for childhood concerns, including but not limited to:

  • feeding difficulties
  • sleep issues
  • recurrent ear infections
  • colic and digestive issues
  • torticollis
  • plagiocephaly (misshapen head),
  • sensory processing issues
  • neurodevelopmental difficulties 

Our occupational therapy and physical therapy teams offer free phone consultations and screens.  Call our office to schedule one with Jessica, Jessica or Marion. 

 TALK  TO A  THERAPIST 

 

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Topics: Jessica Turchin, Marion Wilm, Jessica Hoffarth, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Occupational therapist & mom, Jessica Hoffarth: another idea for home!

Thursday, Sep 3, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Jessica Hoffarth OTR/L, occupational therapist and mom, blends those roles both at work and home.  She has discovered another resource for fun and messy activities for families.  

These are suitable for all kids, including or especially those with sensory processing difficulties. 

APlus.com shared ideas from Asia Citro, mom and author of Fun At Home With Kids.  These safe ideas allow for play, socialization, environment exploration and many other benefits:

  • Glowing water for the bath
  • Foaming dough
  • Miniature floating beads
  • Rainbow soap foam
  • Elephant toothpaste
  • Polka dot slime
  • Glowing play dough
  • Ice tower
  • Puffing snow
  • Salt sculptures
  • Colored beans
  • And more! 

Click here for details and directions. 

Jessica shares that she is trying these out this weekend! 

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Topics: Jessica Hoffarth, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

developmental disabilities: 10 things every parent should know

Tuesday, Aug 18, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Jessica Hoffarth, MS, OTR/L, an occupational therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, discovered a great accumulation of resources in a recent post on disability.gov.   

The post provides a top 10 list of things parents of children with developmental disabilities should know. The highlights are: 

  1. Understand developmental disabilities
  2. Essential early interventions
  3. Special education and related services
  4. Special health care needs
  5. The transition to adulthood
  6. Self-determination 
  7. Housing and transportation options
  8. Securing your child's future 
  9. Organizations for children and families 
  10. Rights of parents and children with disabilities

Jessica points to the many links that are included in the post.   Check it out! 

She and the 8 other licensed occupational therapists at Child and Family Development are available to share their expertise. We are in-network with many insurance plans, including Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield NC, Cigna, Medcost, North Carolina Medicaid, Primary Physician Care, South Carolina Medicaid and United Health Care.  Our clients also may pay privately and access out-of-network benefits.

Read more about occupational therapy on our blog

 

 

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Topics: Jessica Hoffarth, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Occupational Therapy review: video games as therapy

Monday, Jul 6, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Jessica Hoffarth, MS, OTR/L, an occupational therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, recently reviewed an article.  This post from Today in OT shares information about a burgeoning treatment approach called Mystic Isle, a video game that quantifies and tracks patients’ movements as they complete a series of of exercises.  

OT_News-01

Mystic Isle uses a Microsoft Kinect camera and custom software that immerses players in a virtual island full of customized physical and cognitive tasks. The clinician predetermines the patient’s specific physical and cognitive goals, customizing the level of difficulty for each goal.  Researchers are working to validate video games designed specifically for rehabilitation.

Jessica is always on the lookout for evidence-based occupational therapy approaches and is excited about the possibilities with this one for children and teens. 

Our 9 occupational therapists are licensed by the state of North Carolina.  We do not employ assistants or aides. We are in-network with many insurance plans, including Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield NC, Cigna, Medcost, North Carolina Medicaid, Primary Physician Care and United Health Care. Clients also may pay privately and access out-of-network benefits.

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Topics: Jessica Hoffarth, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Super Hero Body Socks: Occupational Therapist approved (and worn!)

Friday, May 22, 2015 by Child & Family Development

body_sock_super_hero

 

 

Jessica Hoffarth, MS, OTR/L, an occupational therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, is known for her funky and spirited socks.    

 

Imagine her joy upon discovering an occupational therapy tool that has the same silly designs as well as a therapeutic benefit for people with sensory processing difficulties. 

 

Want to learn more about sensory processing skills? Click here

 

  

 

  Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

 

 

 

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Topics: Jessica Hoffarth

Seeing words as pictures: an Occupational Therapy review

Friday, May 8, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Jessica Hoffarth, MS, OTR/L, an occupational therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, recently reviewed an article.      

book_library  

This article from IFL Science summarizes research from Georgetown University Medical Center that asserts that our brain sees words we know like a picture, recognizing whole words rather than strings of letters that require processing, like a "visual dictionary". 

Jessica suggests trying this theory out on yourself and your kids by noticing what happens while you are reading a book or even a grocery list.  

Jessica and the 7 other licensed occupational therapists on our team are available to share their expertise. We are in-network with many insurance plans, including Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield NC, Cigna, Medcost, North Carolina Medicaid, Primary Physician Care and United Health Care.  Our clients also may pay privately and access out-of-network benefits.

  Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

 

 

 

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Topics: Jessica Hoffarth

Media attention on adults with autism spectrum disorder

Thursday, Apr 30, 2015 by Child & Family Development

We have noticed more and more media attention on aging people with autism spectrum disorder and their access to support and care. 

  • Jessica Hoffarth, MS, OTR/L, found this article from Tom Insel, MD, Director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) about the Autism CARES Act (for Collaboration, Accountability, Research, Education and Support). The law ensures the continued work of the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee (IACC), but it also brings new opportunities to focus attention on an area of concern for many parents—what happens when their children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) mature into adulthood? 
  • This month, NBC featured a story titled "You Don't Outgrow Autism..." on Dateline about individuals aging out of access to public and private support programs and the impact it can have on their functional skills and daily life.  
  • The TEACCH program from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill spotlighted their supported employment program providing job coaches for autistic adults and T-STEP (TEACCH School Transition to Employment Program) on their website

Child and Family Development supports this media exposure and offers evaluation and treatment services for kids, teens and young adults with autism. Read more about our services here

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Topics: Jessica Hoffarth, Chris Vrabel, Brandyn Street, Devon Redmond

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