Learning Disabilities: info from our educators

Thursday, Dec 7, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Reading disorders or learning disabilities, and specifically dyslexia impact approximately 20% of the population. The NC and SC public school systems have resources in special education to identify individuals with learning disabilities however, procedures and guidelines are such that most children are not identified with learning disorders until 2nd or 3rd grade and in order to be identified their delays must be significantly impacting their educational performance. Therefore, many children with mild delays simply “fall through the cracks” as their mild delays turn into moderate and severe delays without appropriate intervention. Research indicates the children make the greatest gains in learning to read in grades K through 2nd. Research has also shown that if the reading gap is not remediated by the 3rd grade, it is very hard to close. Therefore, it is imperative that professionals in the medical field collaborate with parents and educators to help identify individuals with learning disabilities.

Learning Disability sub-types:

  • Dyslexia is a phonological based reading disorder which shows in an “unexpected difficulty” with reading tasks such as fluent word recognition, reading decoding, spelling and likely reading comprehension.
  • Dyscalculia is a mathematics disorder in which functioning in either arithmetic calculation; math concept formation and/or speed of execution are substantially below a student’s expected level for age, ability and educational experience.
  • Dysgraphia is a developmental written expression disorder in which the complex set of motor skills and information processing skills required to produce writing are delayed in handwriting, spelling and the organization of the written word on paper.
  • Nonverbal Learning Disability Is not presently a diagnostic condition but rather refers to a syndrome characterized by significant deficits in motor, visual spatial and social skills resulting from an individual’s difficulty interpreting nonverbal information. 

Pre-academic/Pre-school Warning Signs of Learning Disabilities:

  • Late speech development
  • Late development with learning alphabets letters and sounds (late is considered by 5 to 5 ½ years)
  • Inconsistent development and learning of the alphabet and sounds
  • Poor rhyming skills
  • Avoiding drawing/coloring, pre-writing tasks
  • Weak fine motor skills
  • Late established hand dominance
  • Immature or muddled speech (says aminal for animal)
  • Difficulty with word retrieval (says ummm and thing)
  • Advanced vocabulary in comparison to development of reading skills
  • Late color recognition

Warning signs for school aged children:

  • Oral reading is slow or labored
  • Reads with substitutions, adds words or guesses at words
  • Poor decoding skills (not able to properly “sound out a word”)
  • Poor spelling skills (often individuals with dyslexia will spell words correctly on a spelling test ,but are not able to generalize into other day-to-day writing assignments)
  • Poor fine motor skills, handwriting
  • Trouble with recall or retrieval of math facts, especially quick retrieval
  • Writes or reads letters and/or numbers reversed
  • Doesn't enjoy reading and/or writing

Often, teachers do not pick up on signs of learning disabilities until later grades as letter reversals and poor handwriting are often times viewed as developmental concerns. However, if a parent has any concern it is best to at least speak with an educational specialist and psychologist to determine the need for evaluation. Early intervention is the key.

Click here to read more about educational testing and tutoring services at Child and Family Development. 

Click here for a printable page about learning disabilities.

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Psychoeducational evaluations at Child and Family Development

Thursday, Nov 30, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development psychologists and educators offer comprehensive evaluation services.  

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Topics: Aleksandra Liss, Gretchen Hunter, Chris Vrabel, Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, Brandyn Street, Devon Redmond, C&FD Psychological Services, Shavonda Bean, Ashley Kies, Trisha Dyer, Kelsie Salmen, ed

Academic Technology Supports for Students

Thursday, Nov 9, 2017 by Child & Family Development



Child & Family Development educational specialists determine a student’s learning style and differences, then find ways to support school success. Tutoring can address areas such as reading (dyslexia), mathematics (dyscalculia), written expression (dysgraphia) and related auditory, visual and nonverbal processing difficulties or disorders. Executive functioning and organizational skills are also needed for optimal learning and performance. Often, computer programs and applications are part of a customized treatment plan.

OUR APPROACHES include:

• Audible©, Learning Ally™ and other audiobook reading applications
• Books
• Computer/tablet features and tools
• Dragon Naturally Speaking®
• Keyboarding Without Tears from Learning Without Tears®
• Smartphone features and tools
• Wi-fi Usage
• Program “Mind, Body, Backpack”: strengthen executive functioning skills and apply approaches in a meaningful way.
• Program “Techie-Wanna-Be”: instruction on appropriate applications and programs that support learning.

COST
Individual sessions are offered at $65 per hour. These sessions are not billable to insurance and are non-refundable. Small groups may also be formed, based on interest and shared treatment goals.

CONTACT  
MIDTOWN OFFICE
Jessica DeLing, M.Ed., Educational Specialist 704-372-9652 ext. 123
PINEVILLE OFFICE
Marie Arrington, MAT, Educational Specialist 704-372-9652 ext. 218
Mo Froneberger, MAT, Educational Specialist 704-372-9652 ext. 219

Read more about Technology Supports for Students here.

Read more about our educational services here

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Orton-Gillingham services at Child & Family Development

Wednesday, Aug 23, 2017 by Child & Family Development


Child and Family Development educational specialists are trained experts in Orton Gillinghama methodology of reading instruction for people with dyslexia developed by a neurologist, an educator and psychologist.  

According to their website, Institute for Multi-Sensory Education, this theory combines multi-sensory techniques along with the structure of the English language. Those items taught include phonemes and morphemes, such as prefixes, suffixes, and roots and common spelling rules.  Multi-sensory education incorporates the three learning pathways, which are: auditory, kinesthetic, and visual. 

Features of Orton Gillingham:

  • an intensive, sequential phonic-based system teaches the basics of word formation before whole meanings.
  • accommodates and utilizes the three learning modalities through which people learn
    • visual
    • auditory
    • kinesthetic
  • flexibility to allow for individual learning style

Click here to read more about Orton Gillingham services.  

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

C&FD Workshop: 9/28/17 Parent Boot Camp for School Year Success

Thursday, Aug 17, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Parent Boot Camp for School Year Success

Child and Family Development is pleased to offer our first parent workshop that is all about executive function.

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Topics: Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Jessica DeLing, educator, celebrates 5 years at C&FD

Monday, Aug 14, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Jessica DeLing 

Jessica DeLing MEd is an educational specialist at the Midtown office. She is celebrating years at Child and Family Development this month.   

She notes that so many funny things happen during her interactions with students: 

This page is a list of FRIENDSHIP RULES TO FOLLOW, including things like being kind and safe. It also includes one that makes her smile that says "Be peaceful because if your [sp] loud knowon [sp] can focue."  

Congratulations Jessica! 

Read More

Topics: Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Back To School: C&FD help with transitions

Friday, Aug 4, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Back To School is for students making an academic change. It is appropriate for all kids, but especially when they are:

o   rising into a new grade level

o   retained or reclassed for a grade level

o   starting at a new school

o   transitioning to a new school environment during the year 

This service is offered by our Educational Specialists, all of whom have experience as teachers in our local public school systems. The Educational Specialists provide the therapy a student requires to overcome academic challenges. They are experienced in evaluating and treating the underlying learning deficits in the diagnostic subtypes including dyslexia, dysgraphia, dyscalculia and non verbal learning disorder. They develop a holistic treatment plan which addresses each student’s individual learning needs as their difficulties impact school success.

Typically, it includes 6 sessions that usually occur just before and in the first month or so of the new school year.

Objectives

The program is designed to be an enjoyable way for students to build confidence and academic skills specific to their age and grade level expectations. It is customized based on individual goals.  Students will learn about personal learning styles and organizational strategies that can be applied to their coursework and school environment.  The Educator provides regular session summaries, suggestions and resource ideas to parents.    

Scheduling

Appointments are available, according to your family’s schedule.  We recommend two sessions before the start of the school year, followed by four sessions scheduled within the first 4-6 weeks of school.    Follow-up consultations may also be beneficial.  We suggest scheduling those by semester or during holiday breaks.

Cost  

o   30 minute session: $37.50

o   60 minute session:  $75.00

Contact 

o   MIDTOWN: Jessica DeLing MEd, Educational Specialist, 704-372-9653 ext. 123

o   PINEVILLE: Marie Arrington MAT, Educational Specialist, 704-372-9653 ext. 218

Read more about our educational services here

Info page about Back To School package here

Read More

Topics: Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Educators vote YEA in favor of recently passed law about dyslexia: HB 149

Tuesday, Jul 25, 2017 by Child & Family Development

The educators at Child and Family Development vote "YEA" for House Bill 149, which the North Carolina senate has just signed into law!

HB 149 will much needed awareness in the public school for students with dyslexia and learning disabilities as well support our teachers.  

According to the NC Decoding Dyslexia website, HB 149 will:

  • Define dyslexia in the state education code.
  • Ensure that the State Board of Education provide professional development "on the identification of and intervention strategies for students with dyslexia, dyscalculia, or other specific learning disabilities."
  • Require State Board of Education to develop and make available information electronically about dyslexia, educational methodologies, screenings and what is available to support the work with children with dyslexia.
  • Require local boards of education to review the diagnostic tools and screening instruments they have available.

We are happy to support this advancement:

  • Mary "Mo" Fronberger MAT
  • Jessica DeLing M.Ed.
  • Marie Arrington MAT 

Our team offers diagnostic tutoring, academic coaching and other support services.  Most clients have weekly appointments, but intensive and consultative sessions are also available.  Several TREATMENT services are available, including:

  • Academic Coaching
  • College Placement, Preparation and Application Process
  • Educational Therapy
  • End Of Grade (EOG) Preparation 
  • Organizational Skills 
  • School Placement and Transitions 
  • School Project Support
  • Schoolwork/ Homework Help and Planning 
  • Social Skills Support 
  • Summertime Academic Intensives
  • Tutoring 

 

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Educator, Jessica DeLing, recommends this online source for phonics apps and info

Friday, May 5, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 

Jessica DeLing MEd, educational specialist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, recommends an online source about reading and learning skills in children and teens. It is called Reading Rockets.

A recently published post highlights 11 phonics apps that includes these tools: 

  • Interactive Alphabet
  • iSpy Phonics
  • ABC Expedition
  • ABC Song Piano
  • Alphabytes
  • Simple Spelling with Reverse Phonics: Lite
  • Word Wizard: Talking Moveable Alphabet & Spelling Test for Kids
  • The Electric Company Wordball
  • Bob Books #1- Reading Magic
  • Word Wagon by Duck Duck Moose
  • FirstWords Deluxe

Our Educators often recommend various technology-based supports to help students be successful in all aspects of school: classes, homework and projects. Contact our Charlotte or Pineville offices for help to develop and implement an appropriate plan for your student.  

Read more about our educational assessment and tutoring services here.

Read More

Topics: Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Learning Disabilities: info from our educators

Tuesday, Apr 25, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Reading disorders or learning disabilities, and specifically dyslexia impact approximately 20% of the population. The NC and SC public school systems have resources in special education to identify individuals with learning disabilities however, procedures and guidelines are such that most children are not identified with learning disorders until 2nd or 3rd grade and in order to be identified their delays must be significantly impacting their educational performance. Therefore, many children with mild delays simply “fall through the cracks” as their mild delays turn into moderate and severe delays without appropriate intervention. Research indicates the children make the greatest gains in learning to read in grades K through 2nd. Research has also shown that if the reading gap is not remediated by the 3rd grade, it is very hard to close. Therefore, it is imperative that professionals in the medical field collaborate with parents and educators to help identify individuals with learning disabilities.

Learning Disability sub-types:

  • Dyslexia is a phonological based reading disorder which shows in an “unexpected difficulty” with reading tasks such as fluent word recognition, reading decoding, spelling and likely reading comprehension.
  • Dyscalculia is a mathematics disorder in which functioning in either arithmetic calculation; math concept formation and/or speed of execution are substantially below a student’s expected level for age, ability and educational experience.
  • Dysgraphia is a developmental written expression disorder in which the complex set of motor skills and information processing skills required to produce writing are delayed in handwriting, spelling and the organization of the written word on paper.
  • Nonverbal Learning Disability Is not presently a diagnostic condition but rather refers to a syndrome characterized by significant deficits in motor, visual spatial and social skills resulting from an individual’s difficulty interpreting nonverbal information. 

Pre-academic/Pre-school Warning Signs of Learning Disabilities:

  • Late speech development
  • Late development with learning alphabets letters and sounds (late is considered by 5 to 5 ½ years)
  • Inconsistent development and learning of the alphabet and sounds
  • Poor rhyming skills
  • Avoiding drawing/coloring, pre-writing tasks
  • Weak fine motor skills
  • Late established hand dominance
  • Immature or muddled speech (says aminal for animal)
  • Difficulty with word retrieval (says ummm and thing)
  • Advanced vocabulary in comparison to development of reading skills
  • Late color recognition

Warning signs for school aged children:

  • Oral reading is slow or labored
  • Reads with substitutions, adds words or guesses at words
  • Poor decoding skills (not able to properly “sound out a word”)
  • Poor spelling skills (often individuals with dyslexia will spell words correctly on a spelling test ,but are not able to generalize into other day-to-day writing assignments)
  • Poor fine motor skills, handwriting
  • Trouble with recall or retrieval of math facts, especially quick retrieval
  • Writes or reads letters and/or numbers reversed
  • Doesn't enjoy reading and/or writing

Often, teachers do not pick up on signs of learning disabilities until later grades as letter reversals and poor handwriting are often times viewed as developmental concerns. However, if a parent has any concern it is best to at least speak with an educational specialist and psychologist to determine the need for evaluation. Early intervention is the key.

Click here to read more about educational testing and tutoring services at Child and Family Development. 

Click here for a printable page about learning disabilities.

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Don't Take Our Word For It! Above & Beyond Psycho-Educational Service

Friday, Jan 6, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Educator, Jessica DeLing MEd and psychologist, Devon Redmond PhD work in tandem regularly at Child and Family Development- Midtown to provide psychoeducational assessments to children, teens and young adults.  

A recent client survey included this comment: "We are very pleased with the services we received at C&FD!  Their experts gave so much clarification to what is going on with our son.  They truly went above and beyond to help us.  Thank you!”

Read more about psychoeducational evaluations here.          

Read More

Topics: Jessica DeLing, Devon Redmond, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services, C&FD Testimonials

School placement help from C&FD Educators

Tuesday, Nov 22, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development Educational Specialists have received schooling and advanced training in administering educational evaluations, interpreting data diagnostically, and developing and implementing educational treatment plans. At minimum, they each hold a master’s degree and have extensive clinical experience developing their skill set. Our team has expertise in the treatment of learning disabilities and academic interventions. They are well connected with the educational resources of our community. Perhaps one of their most unique qualifications is that they are experienced in working collaboratively with schools and are knowledgeable about the rules and regulations that govern services within the school system.

So, as part of psychoeducational assessments or during the course of academic support or tutoring intervention, the Educator may recommend exploring different school settings and particular schools to a family. There are many options to consider:

  • Public Schools: These schools are financed by local, state and federal government funds.  In most cases, they must admit all students who live within the borders of their district.  Charter and magnet schools are relatively new sub types of public schools.
  • Charter Schools: They are independently operated public schools started by parents, teachers, community organizations, and for-profit companies. These schools receive tax dollars, but the sponsoring group may also come up with private funding. Charter schools do not charge tuition. These schools must adhere to the basic curricular requirements of the state but are free from many of the regulations that apply to conventional schools. They are not subject to the scrutiny of school boards or government authorities. Considered cutting edge, charter schools usually challenge standard education practices and sometimes specialize in a particular area, such as technology or the arts, or adopt a basic core-subjects approach. Some charter schools specifically target gifted or high-risk kids. They usually have smaller classes and offer more individual attention than conventional public schools. Online charter schools are now also an option.
  • Magnet Schools: These are free public schools that can be highly competitive and highly selective. They are known for special programs and high academic standards. They may specialize in a particular area, such as science or the arts. Students who apply to these schools may go through a rigorous testing and application process. Some magnet schools have boarding facilities to allow students from other communities to attend. Magnet schools were first launched in the 1970s to help desegregate public school systems by encouraging children to attend schools outside their neighborhoods. Student diversity is still an explicit goal of most magnet schools.
  • Public School Choice Programs:This option frees families from having to attend their assigned neighborhood school. Some districts voluntarily offer school choice. Others are required to provide parents with options when a school is failing to meet the standards set by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.
  • Private Schools: These schools rely on tuition payments and funds from nonpublic sources such as religious organizations, endowments, grants and charitable donations. These schools select from a pool of students who apply for admission. They may be coed or single sex. About a third of the elementary and secondary schools in the United States are private.
  • Independent Schools: These are private, nonprofit schools governed by boards of trustees. Independent schools draw their funds from tuition payments, charitable contributions, and endowments rather than from taxes or church funds. They may be affiliated with a religious institution but cannot receive funds or governance from them.
  • Parochial Schools: These are church-related schools, most commonly owned and operated by Catholic parishes or dioceses but also by Protestant denominations. Hebrew schools may also be termed parochial. Your child doesn't have to be Catholic or Protestant to attend a parochial school, but he/she will still be required to attend religious education classes and prayer services.
  • Propreitary Schools: These schools are private schools run for profit. This is a relatively new category of school. They do not answer to any board of trustees or elected officials, so they claim to be able to respond quickly to the demands of the market. Tuition is comparable to that of private, nonprofit schools.
  • Home Schools: Some families opt to complete academic studies at home.  They are obligated to meet state standards but have flexibility in many areas.

When student changes schools, whether starting a new grade or moving from one setting to another, our Educators can help. They developed a program called Transitions to support the student and make a plan for success. Read more about Transitions here.

Read more about our Educators here.

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Struggling at school? Try our Educational Services.

Wednesday, Nov 16, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

Educational specialists have a unique role at Child & Family Development.  They work closely with psychologists and other developmental therapists to understand the learning styles and needs of school-aged children, adolescents and young adults during psycho-educational evaluations.

We help kids, adolescents and young adults with difficulties, including but not limited to:

  • ADHD and other attention difficulties
  • Dyslexia
  • Dysgraphia
  • Learning Differences and Learning Disabilities
  • Non Verbal Learning Disorder

In addition to psycho-educational evaluations, our team offers diagnostic educational support and tutoring.  Most clients have weekly appointments, but intensive and consultative sessions are also available. Several treatment services are available, including:

  • Academic Coaching
  • College Placement, Preparation and Application Process
  • Educational Therapy
  • End-Of-Grade (EOG) Preparation 
  • Organizational Skills 
  • School Placement and Transitions 
  • School Project Support
  • Schoolwork/ Homework Help and Planning 
  • Social Skills Support 
  • Summertime Academic Intensives
  • Tutoring 
 

Learn more about educational testing and tutoring services here

Contact our office to schedule an Intake with an educator at Child and Family Development. 

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

FREE SEMINAR: Reading Support for Students

Friday, Oct 14, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

FREE SEMINAR: READING SUPPORT FOR STUDENTS

PRESENTED BY: 

Amy Hanna, MAT Educational Specialist and Jessica DeLing, MEd Educational Specialistand Jessica DeLing, MEd Educational Specialist will present ways to support reading comprehension at home.    Activities and topics will include:

  • Using question stems to increase comprehension
  • Creating a “Reading Response” journal to extend comprehension to a written response
  • Understanding text types and using graphic organizers to help students understand what they read
  • Simple strategies to address anxiety about reading

EVENT DETAILS: 

Thursday, November 17, 2016

6:15-7:15 PM 

Child and Family Development- Midtown office, 4012 Park Road, Charlotte, NC, 28209

Space is limited so RSVP to reserve your spot here

 Sign up for C&FD News

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Topics: Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Seminars & Workshops

Dyslexia Month Series: accommodations for school and home by Jessica DeLing MEd

Thursday, Oct 13, 2016 by Child & Family Development

October is Dyslexia Month! Our team of Educational Specialists are celebrating by sharing their expertise.

Jessica DeLing M.Ed. is an educational diagnostician at Child and Family Development- Midtown.  She shares:

So far, we have discussed the importance of determining if your child has dyslexia via a psychoeducational assessment. Next up is accommodations! 

Students with dyslexia often require, and can greatly benefit from accommodations, in both the academic setting and at home. Individuals diagnosed with dyslexia may not just have difficulties with reading. Dyslexia can impact various skill sets such as spelling, writing, arithmetic, and sequencing.   Based on specific student needs, accommodations may vary. Providing these tools, and teaching the students how to use the accommodations to support their learning, is so important in helping the dyslexic student reach their full academic potential.  

Although there are a variety of accommodations, check out the information and links below to start researching which accommodations might work best for your dyslexic student:

Some example accommodations include: 

  • Allow the student to complete written assignments using Online dictation  or allowing the student to use a computer, will be beneficial.
  • Read aloud test questions. For tests of reading, allow the student to read out loud to his/herself. Consider allowing the student to test and a separate setting as they will likely need more time to complete work.
  • Clarify or simplify written directions.
  • Use visual presentations of verbal material, such as glossaries and word banks across content areas.
  • Provide advanced copies of class notes and/ or completed study guides.
  • Work with fewer items per page/line. Help the student learn how to independently breakdown large assignments into smaller tasks.
  • Allow the student to learn content from a variety of digital media resources including audiobooks, movies, and videos.

Read more about Jessica here

Read more about our educational services here.

Read more about dyslexia on the National Institute of Learning Development website here.

Read More

Topics: Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Jessica DeLing to speak on executive functioning at The Fletcher School

Thursday, Sep 29, 2016 by Child & Family Development

We are pleased to announce that Jessica DeLing M.Ed., Educational Specialist at Child and Family Development, will be speaking at The Fletcher School-Rankin Institute about executive functioning skills. This is an encore presentation from her popular 2015 offering.

Mind, Body, Backpack: A Multisensory Approach to Executive Functioning
Date: November 1, 2016
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Description: This workshop will focus on the following topics: Mind: Sustaining Attention, Self Advocacy, Flexibility; Body: Task Initiation, Goal Directed Persistence, Self Regulation; Backpack: Organization, Planning and Prioritizing, Time Management.
Location: Rankin Room at The Fletcher School
Contact/Register: Laura Hutchison, 704-365-4658, Ext. 1155, lhutchison@thefletcherschool.org; Registration is required. Cost: $10.  Visit their website to register here.
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Topics: Jessica DeLing, C&FD Seminars & Workshops

Need help with Back To School?

Thursday, Aug 25, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Back To School is a package of therapy sessions for students making an academic change. It is appropriate for all kids, but especially when they are:

o   rising into a new grade level

o   retained or reclassed for a grade level

o   starting at a new school

o   transitioning to a new school environment during the year 

This service is offered by our Educational Specialists, all of whom have experience as teachers in our local public school systems. The Educational Specialists provide the therapy a student requires to overcome academic challenges. They are experienced in evaluating and treating the underlying learning deficits in the diagnostic subtypes including dyslexia, dysgraphia, dyscalculia and non verbal learning disorder. They develop a holistic treatment plan which addresses each student’s individual learning needs as their difficulties impact school success.

It includes 6 sessions that usually occur just before and in the first month or so of the new school year.

Objectives

The program is designed to be an enjoyable way for students to build confidence and academic skills specific to their age and grade level expectations. It is customized based on individual goals.  Students will learn about personal learning styles and organizational strategies that can be applied to their coursework and school environment.  The Educator provides regular session summaries, suggestions and resource ideas to parents.    

Scheduling

Appointments are available, according to your family’s schedule.  We recommend two sessions before the start of the school year, followed by four sessions scheduled within the first 4-6 weeks of school.    Follow-up consultations may also be beneficial.  We suggest scheduling those by semester or during holiday breaks.

Cost  

Cost may vary based on the number and length of sessions.  The sessions are priced at our reduced rate as follows, based on the Educational Services Agreement:  

o   30 minute session: $32.50

o   45 minute session: $48.75

o   60 minute session:  $65.00

Contact 

Jessica DeLing, M.Ed., Educational Specialist

jdeling@childandfamilydevelopment.com

704-332-4834 ext. 123

Read more about our educational services here

Info page about Back To School package here

Read More

Topics: Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Jessica DeLing, educational specialist, celebrates 4 years at C&FD

Tuesday, Aug 2, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

 

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Jessica DeLing

Jessica DeLing M.Ed. is an educational specialist at the Midtown office. She is celebrating years at Child and Family Development this month.   

She is an NC-certified licensed general education and special education teacher and has worked prior as both a general education teacher and special education teacher in Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools. Her 13 years of experience include diagnosing and treating students with learning disabilities and helping students with math, reading and written expression disorders.  Here, Jessica focuses on multi-sensory learning styles, incluidng the Orton-Gillingham method for teaching reading and spelling.  She created the popular program called Organizing Mind, Body & Backpack to support students with executive function weaknesses. 

A colleague shares:  

Jessica is a wonderful colleague.  She is knowledgeable, creative and passionate about her work with children and teens.  Most importantly, she always knows how to throw in some fun while continuing to work so hard!

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Topics: Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Education Intensives for Summer

Thursday, May 19, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Make time for learning this summer!

Our Educational Specialists offer Intensive Programs based on grade levels and subject areas. Programs are based on rising grade levels in Fall 2016. 

Kids can benefit from just one program or a series of programs over time. 

Individual or small group intensives are available.

 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS

Kindergarten Readiness: Pre-K and T-K students; Instruction builds pre-academic skills in reading, writing and math, as well as listening.

Math:  Mostly grades 1-6; Instruction is based on a multi-sensory approach to learning grade-level specific math skills that align with the Common Core standards.

Basic Reading: Mostly grades 1-5; Instruction focuses on stimulating and strengthening the underlying processing areas of phonological awareness and memory in order to improve sound awareness, word decoding, spelling, word recognition and reading fluency.

Writing: Mostly grades 1-5; Instruction focuses on helping students organize their thinking while executing a written piece. By creating an awareness of the various types of writing, as well as opportunities to plan and interact with various topics.  Students will learn strategies for improving their overall written expression skills.

Reading Comprehension: Mostly grades 1-5; Instruction focuses on using grade-level appropriate text to improve higher-order thinking skills so students can share main ideas, infer, predict and summarize written and verbal information.

Executive Functioning Skills (Elementary): Grades 3-5; Using research based practices, students will engage in interactive and fun activities that teach and promote age appropriate executive functioning skills.  By creating an awareness of executive skills across various settings and providing opportunities to practice those skills.  Students will learn strategies to support life-long learning.

Executive Functioning Skills (Middle School/High School): Grades 6-12; Students will be supported and encouraged as they learn strategies for strengthening their executive functioning skills.  Using research based practices and interactive lessons, middle and high school students will reflect on their personal learning styles and learn to apply various strategies in a meaningful way. 

CONTACTS

Jessica DeLing, M.Ed., Educational Specialist; jdeling@childandfamilydevelopment.com; 704-332-4834  ext.123

Mary “Mo” Froneberger, MAT, Educational Specialist; mfroneberger@childandfamilydevelopment.com; 704-541-9080  ext. 219

Marie Arrington, MAT, NBCT, Educational Specialist; mpacini@childandfamilydevelopment.com; 704-541-9080 ext. 218    

Read more about our educational services here.  

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

National Teachers Day!

Tuesday, May 3, 2016 by Child & Family Development

May 3 is National Teachers Day and we are celebrating our team.  

  • Marie Arrington MAT
  • Jessica DeLing MEd
  • Mary "Mo" Froneberger MAT

Educators help students achieve academic success and become independent, life-long learners. 

Educational specialists have a unique role at Child & Family Development.  They work closely with psychologists and other developmental therapists to understand the learning styles and needs of school-aged children, adolescents and young adults during psycho-educational evaluations.  Click here to read more about psycho-educational assessments.  

Our team offers diagnostic educational therapy.  Most clients have weekly appointments, but intensive and consultative sessions are also available.  Several treatment services are available, including:

  • Academic Coaching
  • College Placement, Preparation and Application Process
  • Educational Therapy
  • End-Of-Grade (EOG) Preparation 
  • Organizational Skills 
  • Orton-Gillingham based services 
  • School Placement and Transitions 
  • School Project Support
  • Schoolwork/ Homework Help and Planning 
  • Social Skills Support 
  • Summertime Academic Intensives
  • Tutoring 

All of our educators hold Masters degrees.  They are experienced diagnosticians and have worked in the public schools.  

We help kids, adolescents and young adults with difficulties, including but not limited to:

  • ADHD and other attention difficulties
  • Dyslexia
  • Dysgraphia
  • Learning Differences and Disabilities
  • Non Verbal Learning Disorder

We provide direction and support in determining and meeting the learning needs of every student, from elementary school to the college years. We assist parents in identifying and addressing initial concerns and then developing comprehensive recommendations to move forward, often including Individualized Education Plan (IEP) development with the public school system. Educators also collaborate with schools and community agencies and offer follow-up meetings as parents proceed with their plans. Services can include direct treatment, assessment, consultation and parent advocacy. 

Click here for more information about the educators at Child and Family Development!

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

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Child & Family Development is a multi-disciplinary pediatric clinic serving the needs of Charlotte area children and their families.

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Contact

  • MIDTOWN OFFICE
  • 4012 Park Road, Suite 200
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.332.4834
  • PINEVILLE OFFICE
  • 10516 Park Road
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.541.9080

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