Pelvic Floor Dysfunction & Physical Therapy with Gail Fennimore

Wednesday, Jun 13, 2018 by Child & Family Development

Gail Fennimore, PT PCS is one of the most experienced and tenured physical therapists at Child and Family Development.  In addition to her pediatric clinical specialist (PCS) certification, Gail has specialized training in pelvic floor dysfunction training and offers evaluation and treatment for related conditions.      

There are specific treatment protocols for children with urinary and fecal incontinence with conditions including:

  • Daytime wetting
  • Urinary frequency
  • Withholding urine
  • Constipation
  • Nighttime wetting
  • Urinary urgency
  • Incomplete emptying
  • Fecal incontinence

Gail collaborates with physicians to offer a unique family centered approach to intervention that includes:

  • comprehensive evaluations
  • 1-hour individual appointments on a regular or consultative basis
  • play-based exercise programming
  • toileting sessions
  • customized patient and caregiver training
  • available consultations at the physician offices

In addition, other members of our multidisciplinary clinical team, including psychologists and occupational therapists, may be available for case coordination and patient care.

Specialists, such as urologists and gastroenterlogists, as well as pediatricians, might recommend an evaluation and treatment.  Also, families can to call our office to get started.    

For more information about the benefit of physical therapy for pelvic floor dysfunction, contact:

Gail Fennimore PT PCS C/NDT, gfennimore@childandfamilydevelopment.com, 704-372-9652 ext. 112. 

Read more about Gail's expertise here 

Read More

Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Gail Fennimore

January Anniversaries!

Wednesday, Jan 31, 2018 by Child & Family Development

 IMG_1360 

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Topics: Gail Fennimore, Devon Redmond

Physical Therapy helps PAIN that doesn't go away in kids and teens

Friday, Dec 29, 2017 by Child & Family Development

PAIN IN CHILDREN AND TEENS

Pain in children and teens is complex and may be difficult to diagnose. In kids, the nervous and musculoskeletal systems are still developing. A child’s perception of pain is different from an adult. Children may be unable to differentiate or describe types of pain (I.e. sharp, dull and intense). Some types of pain are straightforward (i.e. post-injury) and other types require more analysis and research (i.e. pain from migraines, pain following a virus, pain after surgery, fibromyalgia, chronic pain and Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). 

Pain in children and teens is broadly referred to as Amplified Musculoskeletal Pain (AMP). Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is another name for AMP. AMP can impact physical activity, mood, school performance, sleep and many other areas. It is chronic pain.

WHAT IS CHRONIC PAIN?

The simple description is pain that lasts longer than 3 months and interferes with a person’s ability to participate in activities of daily living.  

WHAT IS CRPS/AMP?  

Either is a condition of severe localized pain. It is difficult to diagnose and is usually diagnosed by ruling out other possible conditions or diseases. Its prevalence is probably under identified in children and adolescents. It occurs in girls more often than boys. It involves the lower extremities more often than upper extremities. It can move from one extremity to another.

INDICATORS OF AMP/CRPS:

  • A known cause or event that starts the pain cycle, but not always in children
  • Severe pain with light touch or skin, pain response which is disproportionate to injury or continuous pain
  • Changes to the area affected such as swelling, blood flow, hair growth or skin color
  • No other clear cause of pain or inability to move
  • No obvious nerve damage 

EVIDENCE BASED TREATMENT

Elusive pain disorders can be very upsetting for families. Traditional medical care may fail when there is no designated reason for the pain, customary techniques are not beneficial or medications cannot or should not be sustained over a period of time.

A multidisciplinary approach is often recommended, including:

  • physical therapy
  • occupational therapy
  • psychological intervention
  • Physician-prescribed mild medications

Treatment strategies include:

  • child and caregiver education
  • relearning normal use of the affected body part
  • desensitization
  • strengthening of the affected body part
  • coping skills to manage emotional components such as relaxation and mindfulness
  • mobilizing community resources

Outcomes include:

  • restoration of function
  • pain relief
  • reduced school absenteeism
  • social inclusion, not isolation
  • improved self awareness

HAVE A CONCERN?

Child and Family Development physical therapists, occupational therapists and psychologists can help your child get back to his/her healthy, happy self. You will be amazed at the ability to retrain the brain and body!  Click below to learn more about each of these services:

Click here for a printable page about pain. 

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Gail Fennimore, Katie Eggleston, Blake Templeton

Clumsy or Dyspraxia? Read more from C&FD physical therapists

Monday, Dec 18, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 

Many moms and dads who contact Child & Family Development report that their child is “a little clumsy”.  In many instances, it can be difficult to recognize if this is simply part of development and adjusting to a growing body or an area to be explored more specifically. The explanation may be developmental dyspraxia.

 

The physical therapy team provides this explanation. 

 

Developmental dyspraxia is a motor learning difficulty that can affect planning of movements and coordination as a result of brain messages not being accurately transmitted to the body. 

 

Do you describe a child in these ways?

·         Bumping into things all the time, or accident-prone

·         Inability or difficulty with skipping, jumping rope or climbing

·         Strong but not very coordinated

·         Falling out of chairs, knocking things over or messy

·         Awkward or difficulty walking or running

·         Difficulty playing, participating, or insecurities with sports or games

 

Children with dyspraxia have particular problems learning new motor skills and activities and coordinating the upper and lower limbs of the body. To efficiently move through the environment and learn new skills, the body relies on sensory systems- tactile (touch), vestibular (movement) and proprioceptive (how muscles perceive actions). If these systems are not properly integrated, a child appears clumsy.

 

Some characteristics of developmental dyspraxia are:

·         Awkward gait movement

·         Decreased sense of body awareness

·         Emotional lability, sensitivity or appears distracted

·         Difficulty judging distances

·         Difficulty imitating body positions 

·         Poor balance

·         Poor sequencing of activities

·         Poor short and/or long term memory

·         Slow movement planning and reaction times in both fine motor gross motor 

 

Even if only a few of these characteristics are noted in a child, an evaluation could be the first step to address the issue. While there is no cure for dyspraxia, a trained pediatric occupational therapist or physical therapist can assist the child in learning ways to improve their motor planning abilities and becoming more successful with gross motor learning and performance.

 

Current data notes that 6% of all children ages 5-11 have a developmental coordination disorder. It is important to note that motor difficulties are likely to coexist with several other diagnoses, including:

·         Auditory Processing Disorder

·         Executive Function Disorder

·         Hypotonia

·         Low Birth Weight

·         Sensory Processing Disorder

 

There are treatment options for developmental dyspraxia.  There are several types of praxis (movement) that may be addressed in therapy. These types include: oral, sequential, postural, constructional, and praxis on verbal command. 

 

Research shows that a combination of strength and coordination goals, as well as work on specific functional skills (climbing stairs, skipping) is most effective. A therapist can, through play and exploration of new motor activities, address the affected area(s) of praxis and improve overall motor planning and abilities. 

 

Advanced training and techniques are used in treatment of developmental dyspraxia:

·         E-Stimulation (E-Stim) 

·         Neuro-Developmental Treatment (NDT)™

·         Sensory Integration

·         Total Motion Release (TMR)®

 

Read More

Topics: Amy Sturkey, Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Gail Fennimore, Katie Eggleston, Blake Templeton

Pelvic Floor Dysfunction & Physical Therapy with Gail Fennimore

Friday, Nov 17, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Gail Fennimore, PT PCS is one of the most experienced and tenured physical therapists at Child and Family Development.  In addition to her pediatric clinical specialist (PCS) certification, Gail has specialized training in pelvic floor dysfunction training and offers evaluation and treatment for related conditions.      

There are specific treatment protocols for children with urinary and fecal incontinence with conditions including:

  • Daytime wetting
  • Urinary frequency
  • Withholding urine
  • Constipation
  • Nighttime wetting
  • Urinary urgency
  • Incomplete emptying
  • Fecal incontinence

Gail collaborates with physicians to offer a unique family centered approach to intervention that includes:

  • comprehensive evaluations
  • 1-hour individual appointments on a regular or consultative basis
  • play-based exercise programming
  • toileting sessions
  • customized patient and caregiver training
  • available consultations at the physician offices

In addition, other members of our multidisciplinary clinical team, including psychologists and occupational therapists, may be available for case coordination and patient care.

Specialists, such as urologists and gastroenterlogists, as well as pediatricians, might recommend an evaluation and treatment.  Also, families can to call our office to get started.    

For more information about the benefit of physical therapy for pelvic floor dysfunction, contact:

Gail Fennimore PT PCS C/NDT, gfennimore@childandfamilydevelopment.com, 704-372-9652 ext. 112. 

Read more about Gail's expertise here 

Read More

Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Gail Fennimore

C&FD PTs are celebrating National Physical Therapy Month!

Monday, Oct 2, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Our team of 6 physical therapists is celebrating National Physical Therapy Month 2017 with the American Physical Therapy Association!

MIDTOWN OFFICE (Charlotte) PINEVILLE OFFICE

Gail Fennimore PT PCS

Amy Sturkey LPT 

Blake Templeton DPT

Katie Eggleston Kennedy DPT

Erin Krueger DPT ATRIC

Jessica Turchin MPT ATRIC

We provide services to children, teens and young adults with developmental, neurological and congenital impairments.  Services can be habilitative (learning a skill for the first time) or rehabilitative (becoming more proficient at a skill or relearning a skill).  We focus on improving and adapting a child's gross motor abilities.  

If you notice difficulties in one or more of these areas, an evaluation and treatment may be appropriate:

  • Balance
  • Coordination
  • Endurance
  • Flexibility
  • Gait
  • Gross Motor Skill Acquisition
  • Motor Planning
  • Muscle Strength
  • Postural Alignment 
  • Range Of Motion
  • Strength in trunk and legs
  • Surgical Rehabilitation 

All of our therapists are licensed by the state of North Carolina. 

Child and Family Development physical therapists are in-network with many insurance plans, including Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC, Cigna, Medcost, North Carolina Medicaid, Primary Physician Care, South Carolina Medicaid and United Health Care.  Our clients also may pay privately and access out-of-network benefits.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Gail Fennimore, Katie Eggleston, Blake Templeton

Pediatric Spasticity Study w/ Allergan & Mecklenburg Neurological Associates

Thursday, Aug 10, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 

Child and Family Development is proud to participate in an Allergan Pediatric Spasticity Study with On Site Clinical Research and Dr. Robert Nahouraii of Mecklenburg Neurological Associates.

3 C&FD therapists are credentialed for this study: 

Please consider being part of this important medical research study evaluating BOTOX for the treatment of upper limb and lower limb spasticity in children between the ages of 2-17 years.

For more information about criterion and benefits, contact On Site Clinical: Michala Michaux, 704-619-5834, mmichaux@onsiteclinical.com

Read More

Topics: Marion Wilm, Abbey Wash, Gail Fennimore

Physical Therapy helps infants with torticollis

Thursday, Jun 1, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development physical therapists loves helping infants diagnosed with torticollis or plagiocephaly. 

Infants experience such rapid gross motor development in the first seven months of life and with just a few tips to new parents, there can be huge improvements in their overall development.

A diagnosis of torticollis means that there is a neck musculature imbalance, and the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) is the muscle involved. Plagiocephaly is usually a secondary diagnosis to torticollis. It is caused by the infant resting heavily on one part of the head which leads to a flattening of the head in that area.

A helmet is usually prescribed to improve head shape, but many of the cases I have treated by conservative measures have improved head shape and a helmet is not necessary.

The SCM is the large neck muscle that runs from the mastoid process (close to the ear), all the way down to the sternum. Its function is to rotate and tilt the head. When the SCM is tight on one side it causes the head to tilt in that direction and rotate to the opposite direction. For example, if the right SCM is tight, the child's head will tilt to the right and rotate to the left. Now, there are exceptions to every rule and sometimes a child's head will tilt and rotate to the same side, but for the most part, torticollis follows the previously mentioned pattern.

The cause of the musculature imbalance could be related to how the child was positioned in the womb, positioning following birth during sleep or resting, and/or if the child is not getting the necessary amount of tummy time. Most of the time, a parent or a pediatrician notice the child's head is flat on one side or on the back or notice a slight tilt of the neck/head in photographs.

The treatment for torticollis is effective. Weekly physical therapy usually takes 6-12 weeks, depending on the severity. There's also a home exercise program of daily stretching. 

Want more info or to schedule an appointment?

Contact our office to schedule a free phone consult with a Child and Family Development physical therapist. 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

 Click here to read more about torticollis on the National Institute of Health website.

Click here and here to read more about tummy time on our blog. 

Click here to register for our June 8 New Take On Tummy Time free seminar.

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Gail Fennimore, Katie Eggleston, Blake Templeton

Free Tummy Time class for expectant and new parents

Friday, May 19, 2017 by Child & Family Development

New Take on Tummy Time

Two esteemed members of our multidisciplinary team will lead this presentation:

For parents, caregivers and professionals (adults only; no childcare available)

Thursday, June 8 @ 6:15-7:15 pm

Child and Family Development– Midtown, 4012 Park Road, Suite 200, Charlotte NC 28209

How to effectively guide your child’s early development. Topics:

How early motor skills develop

  • Gravity – Good or Bad
  • Development from 0-3 months
  • Development from 4-6 months

Early benefits of positioning and movement

  • How positioning helps a baby gain skills
  • Positioning for feeding
  • Positioning for movement

Fresh alternative activities while interacting with your baby

Click here to print a flyer.

RSVP is required.  Click HERE to register. 

SEMINARS & WORKSHOPS

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Topics: Gail Fennimore, Ann Guild, C&FD Seminars & Workshops

Free Seminar on June 8: New Take on Tummy Time

Monday, Apr 24, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 New Take on Tummy Time

Two esteemed members of our multidisciplinary team will lead this presentation:

  • Gail Fennimore, PT, PCS, C/NDT, physical therapist
  • Ann Guild, MA CCC-SLP, C/NDT, speech therapist

For parents, caregivers and professionals (adults only; no childcare available)

Thursday, June 8 @ 6:15-7:15 pm

Child and Family Development– Midtown, 4012 Park Road, Suite 200, Charlotte NC 28209

How to effectively guide your child’s early development. Topics:

How early motor skills develop

  • Gravity – Good or Bad
  • Development from 0-3 months
  • Development from 4-6 months

Early benefits of positioning and movement

  • How positioning helps a baby gain skills
  • Positioning for feeding
  • Positioning for movement

Fresh alternative activities while interacting with your baby

Click here for a printable flyer.

RSVP is required.  Click HERE to register. 

SEMINARS & WORKSHOPS

Read More

Topics: Gail Fennimore, Ann Guild, C&FD Seminars & Workshops

Don't Take Our Word For It! Physical therapy and more.

Friday, Feb 17, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Gail Fennimore PT PCS C/NDT works at Child and Family Development- Midtown and knows that sometimes the job includes more than physical therapy expertise. 

A recent client survey included this comment: "Gail has been wonderful to work with our insurance company.  She has gone above and beyond with trying to get coverage for our son!”

Read more about our physical therapists here.          

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Gail Fennimore, C&FD Testimonials

Physical therapist, Gail Fennimore, celebrates 23 years at C&FD

Tuesday, Jan 31, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Gail Fennimore!

Gail Fennimore PT PCS C/NDT is a physical therapist at Child and Family Development- Midtown.  This month, she celebrates 23 years!  

She shares this tidbit:

"I chose to become a PT after a high school injury.  I received physical therapy and was excited by the field even then.  After all of the time, the key to staying motivated is to be curious!"

Great advice from a great therapist!

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Gail Fennimore

Physical Therapy Focus: Kids & Constipation by Gail Fennimore

Monday, Oct 24, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

October is National Physical Therapy Month and we are celebrating with the APTA #choosePT

Each physical therapist on our staff of 6 will share bit of expertise, including Gail Fennimore MPT PCS C/NDT!

Gail is one of the most experienced and tenured physical therapists at Child and Family Development. In addition to her pediatric clinical specialist (PCS) certification, Gail has specialized training in pelvic floor dysfunction training and offers evaluation and treatment for related conditions. There are specific treatment protocols for children with urinary and fecal incontinence with conditions including:

•   Daytime wetting

•   Urinary frequency

•   Withholding urine

•   Constipation

•   Nighttime wetting

•   Urinary urgency

•   Incomplete emptying

•   Fecal incontinence

Recently, Gail read an article about constipation and the benefits of physical therapy. 

It states that recent research shows that many children with constipation may have an easier time going to the bathroom when potty training is paired with exercises to improve posture and strengthen pelvic muscles.

Researchers focused on 53 school-age kids with what's known as functional constipation, a common childhood problem that can be caused by psychological or neurological issues. This type of constipation isn't due to physical or hormonal issues that make bowel movements difficult.  Children with functional constipation may have weak pelvic floor muscles from poor posture or sitting in an awkward, unstable position on an adult-size toilet seat. The pelvic floor muscles work closely with the diaphragm, lower back muscles and abdominal muscles to support the spine and stabilize the digestive system. When the pelvic muscles don't work optimally, kids can struggle to control bowel movements. 

Kids receiving physical therapy practiced proper posture on the toilet and did exercises to teach awareness of sensations that indicate a need to defecate and effective muscle contracting and relaxing for easier bowel movements.

Read more about Pelvic Floor Dysfunction services here.

Learn more about our physical therapists on our website and our blog.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

Read More

Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Gail Fennimore

Physical therapist, Gail Fennimore looks into "text neck" troubles

Tuesday, Oct 4, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Gail Fennimore PT PCS C/NDT is one of the most experienced and tenured physical therapists at Child and Family Development and works at our Midtown office.  

Gail has a reputation for reading professional journals regularly, but found an interesting article in The Costco Connection recently that grabbed her attention almost as much.

The article about "text neck" troubles explains how our society is adopting more awkward postures and "turtling in" as screens get smaller and smaller, resulting over time in loss of normal spine curvature.  The outcomes can include neck and shoulder pain, headaches, premature disk degeneration, arthritis, bone remodeling and a hunched back. 

Tips to prevent text neck include:

  • practice perfect posture
  • vary postures, set limits and take breaks
  • bring devices to eye level
  • use talk-to-text feature and use Siri
  • strengthen neck muscles

Results from one recent research study revealed that physical therapy care can reduce pain, improved range of motion and correct spine curvature.  Our team of 6 are trained in anatomy, pain management and strengthening activities.   

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

 

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Gail Fennimore

National Physical Therapy Month #choosePT

Friday, Sep 30, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

October is National Physical Therapy Month and we are celebrating with the APTA #choosePT

Pediatric physical therapy is not just rehabilitation of injuries or therapy for “little adults”. While it certainly includes rehabilitation from sports injuries, post-surgery, broken bones and other conditions, it more commonly addresses “habilitation” rather than “re-habilitation”. That is, we are working with children to develop gross motor skills for the first time, rather than regain skills after a loss.  This “habilitation” often occurs when there is a gross motor delay related to late crawling and late walking.  At times, a delay is present in conjunction with a medical diagnosis, such as cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, mitochondrial disorder and spina bifida, to name just a few.

STAFF:

MIDTOWN OFFICE

Gail Fennimore PT, PCS, C/NDT

Jill Pfund DPT

Amy Sturkey LPT, C/NDT

PINEVILLE OFFICE

Katie Eggleston DPT

Erin Krueger DPT, ATRIC

Jessica Turchin MPT, ATRIC

SPECIALTY SERVICES INCLUDE:

  • Adaptive Equipment Assessment & Management
  • Aquatic Therapy at Harris YMCA
  • Constraint Induced Movement Therapy
  • Craniosacral Therapy (CST)
  • Karate Groups
  • Kinesiotaping® & Strapping
  • Learning To Ride A Bike
  • Neurodevelopmental Treatment™ (NDT)
  • Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES)
  • Pelvic Floor Dysfunction
  • Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation
  • Serial Casting
  • Sports Rehab & Training
  • Total Motion Release® (TMR)

Learn more about our physical therapists on our website and our blog.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

Read More

Topics: Amy Sturkey, Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Gail Fennimore, Katie Eggleston

Don't Take Our Word For It! one of the best physical therapists around

Tuesday, Sep 20, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Gail Fennimore, PT PCS C/NDT is one of the most experienced and tenured physical therapists at Child and Family Development. 

A recent client survey provided this praise: "Gail Fennimore is so much better than my son's prior PTs.  Gail is very knowledgeable and personable and is really addressing his needs well.”

Read more about Gail's approach to pediatric therapy here.     

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

Read More

Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Gail Fennimore, C&FD Testimonials

Allergan Pediatric Spasticity Study w/ Mecklenburg Neurological Associates

Monday, Jun 6, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 OSC_Access.jpg

Child and Family Development is proud to participate in an Allergan Pediatric Spasticity Study with On Site Clinical Research and Dr. Robert Nahouraii of Mecklenburg Neurological Associates.

3 C&FD therapists are credentialed for this study: 

Please consider being part of this important medical research study evaluating BOTOX for the treatment of upper limb and lower limb spasticity in children between the ages of 2-17 years.

For more information about criterion and benefits, contact On Site Clinical: Michala Michaux, 704-619-5834, mmichaux@onsiteclinical.com

Read More

Topics: Marion Wilm, Abbey Wash, Gail Fennimore

exceptional minds article about moviemaking and autism

Friday, Mar 18, 2016 by Child & Family Development

The Child and Family Development team is excited about our upcoming conference, Autism Spectrum Disorder Conference: A Multidisciplinary Review of Current Research and Interventions

We love reading stories of success about people with autism spectrum disorder.  Parade Magazine recently published this story about accomplishments in the movie making, including visual effects, post-production and editing.  Click here for the full article.  

The interviews got one of our most tenured physical therapists, Gail Fennimore PT PCS C/NDT, to thinking about how important early intervention and family support over a lifespan are and what an impact this foundation can have on a person's life. Charlotte has many wonderful services and supports for people and families facing an autism diagnosis.  

Read More

Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Gail Fennimore, C&FD 2016 Autism Spectrum Disorder Conference

Don't Take Our Word For It! Physical therapy for pelvic floor and core improvements.

Thursday, Feb 4, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Gail Fennimore, PT PCS is one of the most experienced and tenured physical therapists at Child  and Family Development.  In addition to her pediatric clinical specialist (PCS) certification, Gail has specialized training in pelvic floor dysfunction training and offers evaluations and treatment for related conditions.      

Recently, one mother expressed how these services benefited her child. She shares... 

When my daughter was 5 years old, she was diagnosed with Tethered Cord Syndrome and had surgery on her spinal cord to relieve pressure on the nerves going to her bladder and causing constant incontinence.  The surgery was successful, however, over the next year she had lasting problems from what we assumed was nerve damage.  The only diagnosis the urologist could give for the remaining incontinence was Overactive Bladder Syndrome and we put her on medication for that.  However, the medicine did not help.  In fact, it made the symptoms worse so we had to take her off of it.  The more I learned about Overactive Bladder Syndrome I did not feel that this was the correct diagnoses for my daughters remaining symptoms.  

After realizing the neurosurgeon and urologist had done all they could do medically, we started searching for other answers and are so blessed to have found Gail Fennimore.  She has helped us realize that the lasting incontinence is largely caused by my daughter not having been able to develop proper use of her pelvic floor and surrounding core muscles for years leading up to the spinal cord surgery. Through physical therapy with Gail, we have seen significant improvement in my daughter's ability to recognize and control her bladder functions.  She has also worked on her core strength, which we didn't even know had also been impacted due to the tethered cord. 

We are very thankful for the services and wealth of knowledge Gail Fennimore has provided, not only to my daughter, but to our entire family!  

Read more about Gail's expertise in pelvic floor dysfunction here.    

Read More

Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Gail Fennimore, C&FD Testimonials

Physical therapist, Gail Fennimore celebrates 22+ years at C&FD

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Gail Fennimore, PT PCS 

team_fennimore_2016.jpg

Gail Fennimore is a physical therapist at the Midtown office and is celebrating 22+ years at Child and Family Development this month. 

She is one of the most tenured and experienced therapists on the team and the only certified Pediatric Specialist. Her specialties include neurodevelopmental treatment™ (NDT), pelvic floor dysfunction and serial casting.

A fellow PT shares: 

Gail is one of the most knowledgeable clinicians I have had the pleasure of working with.  She is always willing to share her knowledge and experiences with the people around her. She is kind and patient with everyone she interacts with and is just an overall pleasure to be around.  Gail is the best! 

Gail is truly one-of-a-kind (just like a snowflake) and a valuable part of our multidisciplinary team! 

Read More

Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Gail Fennimore

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insights is a helpful blog brought to you by Child & Family Development

Child & Family Development is a multi-disciplinary pediatric clinic serving the needs of Charlotte area children and their families.

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Contact

  • MIDTOWN OFFICE
  • 4012 Park Road, Suite 200
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.332.4834
  • PINEVILLE OFFICE
  • 10516 Park Road
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.541.9080

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