Physical Therapy helps PAIN that doesn't go away in kids and teens

Friday, Dec 29, 2017 by Child & Family Development

PAIN IN CHILDREN AND TEENS

Pain in children and teens is complex and may be difficult to diagnose. In kids, the nervous and musculoskeletal systems are still developing. A child’s perception of pain is different from an adult. Children may be unable to differentiate or describe types of pain (I.e. sharp, dull and intense). Some types of pain are straightforward (i.e. post-injury) and other types require more analysis and research (i.e. pain from migraines, pain following a virus, pain after surgery, fibromyalgia, chronic pain and Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). 

Pain in children and teens is broadly referred to as Amplified Musculoskeletal Pain (AMP). Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is another name for AMP. AMP can impact physical activity, mood, school performance, sleep and many other areas. It is chronic pain.

WHAT IS CHRONIC PAIN?

The simple description is pain that lasts longer than 3 months and interferes with a person’s ability to participate in activities of daily living.  

WHAT IS CRPS/AMP?  

Either is a condition of severe localized pain. It is difficult to diagnose and is usually diagnosed by ruling out other possible conditions or diseases. Its prevalence is probably under identified in children and adolescents. It occurs in girls more often than boys. It involves the lower extremities more often than upper extremities. It can move from one extremity to another.

INDICATORS OF AMP/CRPS:

  • A known cause or event that starts the pain cycle, but not always in children
  • Severe pain with light touch or skin, pain response which is disproportionate to injury or continuous pain
  • Changes to the area affected such as swelling, blood flow, hair growth or skin color
  • No other clear cause of pain or inability to move
  • No obvious nerve damage 

EVIDENCE BASED TREATMENT

Elusive pain disorders can be very upsetting for families. Traditional medical care may fail when there is no designated reason for the pain, customary techniques are not beneficial or medications cannot or should not be sustained over a period of time.

A multidisciplinary approach is often recommended, including:

  • physical therapy
  • occupational therapy
  • psychological intervention
  • Physician-prescribed mild medications

Treatment strategies include:

  • child and caregiver education
  • relearning normal use of the affected body part
  • desensitization
  • strengthening of the affected body part
  • coping skills to manage emotional components such as relaxation and mindfulness
  • mobilizing community resources

Outcomes include:

  • restoration of function
  • pain relief
  • reduced school absenteeism
  • social inclusion, not isolation
  • improved self awareness

HAVE A CONCERN?

Child and Family Development physical therapists, occupational therapists and psychologists can help your child get back to his/her healthy, happy self. You will be amazed at the ability to retrain the brain and body!  Click below to learn more about each of these services:

Click here for a printable page about pain. 

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Gail Fennimore, Katie Eggleston, Blake Templeton

Clumsy or Dyspraxia? Read more from C&FD physical therapists

Monday, Dec 18, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 

Many moms and dads who contact Child & Family Development report that their child is “a little clumsy”.  In many instances, it can be difficult to recognize if this is simply part of development and adjusting to a growing body or an area to be explored more specifically. The explanation may be developmental dyspraxia.

 

The physical therapy team provides this explanation. 

 

Developmental dyspraxia is a motor learning difficulty that can affect planning of movements and coordination as a result of brain messages not being accurately transmitted to the body. 

 

Do you describe a child in these ways?

·         Bumping into things all the time, or accident-prone

·         Inability or difficulty with skipping, jumping rope or climbing

·         Strong but not very coordinated

·         Falling out of chairs, knocking things over or messy

·         Awkward or difficulty walking or running

·         Difficulty playing, participating, or insecurities with sports or games

 

Children with dyspraxia have particular problems learning new motor skills and activities and coordinating the upper and lower limbs of the body. To efficiently move through the environment and learn new skills, the body relies on sensory systems- tactile (touch), vestibular (movement) and proprioceptive (how muscles perceive actions). If these systems are not properly integrated, a child appears clumsy.

 

Some characteristics of developmental dyspraxia are:

·         Awkward gait movement

·         Decreased sense of body awareness

·         Emotional lability, sensitivity or appears distracted

·         Difficulty judging distances

·         Difficulty imitating body positions 

·         Poor balance

·         Poor sequencing of activities

·         Poor short and/or long term memory

·         Slow movement planning and reaction times in both fine motor gross motor 

 

Even if only a few of these characteristics are noted in a child, an evaluation could be the first step to address the issue. While there is no cure for dyspraxia, a trained pediatric occupational therapist or physical therapist can assist the child in learning ways to improve their motor planning abilities and becoming more successful with gross motor learning and performance.

 

Current data notes that 6% of all children ages 5-11 have a developmental coordination disorder. It is important to note that motor difficulties are likely to coexist with several other diagnoses, including:

·         Auditory Processing Disorder

·         Executive Function Disorder

·         Hypotonia

·         Low Birth Weight

·         Sensory Processing Disorder

 

There are treatment options for developmental dyspraxia.  There are several types of praxis (movement) that may be addressed in therapy. These types include: oral, sequential, postural, constructional, and praxis on verbal command. 

 

Research shows that a combination of strength and coordination goals, as well as work on specific functional skills (climbing stairs, skipping) is most effective. A therapist can, through play and exploration of new motor activities, address the affected area(s) of praxis and improve overall motor planning and abilities. 

 

Advanced training and techniques are used in treatment of developmental dyspraxia:

·         E-Stimulation (E-Stim) 

·         Neuro-Developmental Treatment (NDT)™

·         Sensory Integration

·         Total Motion Release (TMR)®

 

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Gail Fennimore, Katie Eggleston, Blake Templeton

C&FD therapists use Total Motion Release (TMR)

Wednesday, Nov 22, 2017 by Child & Family Development

3 members of our pediatric therapy team are trained in Total Motion Release® (TMR).

  • Marion Wilm, OTR/L, occupational therapist
  • Jessica Turchin MPT ATRIC, physical therapist
  • Erin Krueger DPT ATRIC, physical therapist

Per the TMR website, this approach brings the body back into balance in a slightly different way than what is traditionally thought of for therapy.  TMR identifies fascial restrictions within the body.  Often times range of motion restrictions are not strictly due to muscular tightness.  By addressing the fascial restrictions, new range of motion may be freed, allowing for improved alignment for increased functional abilities.

To learn more about this approach, call us to schedule a free Intake appointment with one of these therapists.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Schedule a free phone consultation with:  Physical Therapist Occupational Therapist Speech Therapist

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Topics: Jessica Turchin, Marion Wilm, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Give aquatic physical therapy a try this fall!

Friday, Oct 20, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development offers pool-based physical therapy at the Harris YMCA!

The fall 2017 schedule block ends in late November and just a few trial spots remain open.  Families can attend one session to determine if a permanent session in the future would be beneficial and feasible. 

We have offered aquatic therapy for about 15 years and two physical therapists are in the water regularly this fall:

Erin Krueger, DPT, ATRIC
 Jessica Turchin, LPT, ATRIC

Sessions in the pool are offered in seasonal blocks or on a 1-time occasional basis to try it out as an adjunct to regular land based therapies. 

Pool therapy is a great complement to a physical therapy or occupational therapy intervention. 

  • The aquatic medium provides a number of unique properties that are almost impossible to replicate on land. 
  • The hydrostatic pressure of the water really helps our pediatric patients with body awareness and sensory integration.  Not to mention the undeniable aid with postural support for not only standing, but also for breathing! 
  • The buoyancy aids in off weighting the body to make coordination of activities much easier, as it can be used to lessen the strength required to perform a movement successfully.  Many people learn to walk first in the water and then on land. 
  • The confidence they have in the water is remarkable.  Imagine seeing a 7 year old motor plan and successfully walk for the first time in the water - now that 10 year old is walking independently on land! 

For the last 7 years, we have partnered with th Harris YMCA in Charlotte near South Park Mall.   The indoor pool has several features that are especially therapeutic including:

  • zero tide entrance, like walking into the ocean
  • whirlpool, with variable resistance and pressure 
  • heated water
  • floating equipment and toys

Click here to read more about the benefits of aquatic therapy.  

Click here to review the pool waiver and consent form. 

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Topics: Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger

C&FD PTs are celebrating National Physical Therapy Month!

Monday, Oct 2, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Our team of 6 physical therapists is celebrating National Physical Therapy Month 2017 with the American Physical Therapy Association!

MIDTOWN OFFICE (Charlotte) PINEVILLE OFFICE

Gail Fennimore PT PCS

Amy Sturkey LPT 

Blake Templeton DPT

Katie Eggleston Kennedy DPT

Erin Krueger DPT ATRIC

Jessica Turchin MPT ATRIC

We provide services to children, teens and young adults with developmental, neurological and congenital impairments.  Services can be habilitative (learning a skill for the first time) or rehabilitative (becoming more proficient at a skill or relearning a skill).  We focus on improving and adapting a child's gross motor abilities.  

If you notice difficulties in one or more of these areas, an evaluation and treatment may be appropriate:

  • Balance
  • Coordination
  • Endurance
  • Flexibility
  • Gait
  • Gross Motor Skill Acquisition
  • Motor Planning
  • Muscle Strength
  • Postural Alignment 
  • Range Of Motion
  • Strength in trunk and legs
  • Surgical Rehabilitation 

All of our therapists are licensed by the state of North Carolina. 

Child and Family Development physical therapists are in-network with many insurance plans, including Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC, Cigna, Medcost, North Carolina Medicaid, Primary Physician Care, South Carolina Medicaid and United Health Care.  Our clients also may pay privately and access out-of-network benefits.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Gail Fennimore, Katie Eggleston, Blake Templeton

Fall 2017 Aquatic Therapy at the Harris YMCA

Monday, Sep 18, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development continues pool-based physical therapy at the Harris YMCA!

We have offered aquatic therapy for about 15 years and four physical therapists will be in the water regularly this fall:

Erin Krueger, DPT, ATRIC
 Jessica Turchin, LPT, ATRIC

Sessions in the pool are offered in seasonal blocks or on a 1-time occasional basis to try it out as an adjunct to regular land based therapies. 

Pool therapy is a great complement to a physical therapy or occupational therapy intervention. 

  • The aquatic medium provides a number of unique properties that are almost impossible to replicate on land. 
  • The hydrostatic pressure of the water really helps our pediatric patients with body awareness and sensory integration.  Not to mention the undeniable aid with postural support for not only standing, but also for breathing! 
  • The buoyancy aids in off weighting the body to make coordination of activities much easier, as it can be used to lessen the strength required to perform a movement successfully.  Many people learn to walk first in the water and then on land. 
  • The confidence they have in the water is remarkable.  Imagine seeing a 7 year old motor plan and successfully walk for the first time in the water - now that 10 year old is walking independently on land! 

For the last 7 years, we have partnered with th Harris YMCA in Charlotte near South Park Mall.   The indoor pool has several features that are especially therapeutic including:

  • zero tide entrance, like walking into the ocean
  • whirlpool, with variable resistance and pressure 
  • heated water
  • floating equipment and toys

Click here to read more about the benefits of aquatic therapy.  

Click here to review the pool waiver and consent form. 

Read More

Topics: Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger

Summer 2017 Aquatic Therapy at the Harris YMCA

Thursday, Jun 8, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development continues pool-based physical therapy at the Harris YMCA!

We have offered aquatic therapy for about 15 years and four physical therapists will be in the water this summer:

Katie Eggleston, DPT
Erin (Harkins) Krueger, DPT, ATRIC
 Jessica Turchin, LPT, ATRIC
Blake Templeton, DPT

Pool therapy is a great complement to a physical therapy or occupational therapy intervention, in addition to regular land based therapies. 

  • The aquatic medium provides a number of unique properties that are almost impossible to replicate on land. 
  • The hydrostatic pressure of the water really helps our pediatric patients with body awareness and sensory integration.  Not to mention the undeniable aid with postural support for not only standing, but also for breathing! 
  • The buoyancy aids in off weighting the body to make coordination of activities much easier, as it can be used to lessen the strength required to perform a movement successfully.  Many people learn to walk first in the water and then on land. 
  • The confidence they have in the water is remarkable.  Imagine seeing a 7 year old motor plan and successfully walk for the first time in the water - now that 10 year old is walking independently on land! 

For the last 7 years, we have partnered with th Harris YMCA in Charlotte near South Park Mall.   The indoor pool has several features that are especially therapeutic including:

  • zero tide entrance, like walking into the ocean
  • whirlpool, with variable resistance and pressure 
  • heated water
  • floating equipment and toys

Click here to read more about the benefits of aquatic therapy.  

Read the C&FD blog

Read More

Topics: Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Katie Eggleston, Blake Templeton

Physical Therapy helps infants with torticollis

Thursday, Jun 1, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development physical therapists loves helping infants diagnosed with torticollis or plagiocephaly. 

Infants experience such rapid gross motor development in the first seven months of life and with just a few tips to new parents, there can be huge improvements in their overall development.

A diagnosis of torticollis means that there is a neck musculature imbalance, and the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) is the muscle involved. Plagiocephaly is usually a secondary diagnosis to torticollis. It is caused by the infant resting heavily on one part of the head which leads to a flattening of the head in that area.

A helmet is usually prescribed to improve head shape, but many of the cases I have treated by conservative measures have improved head shape and a helmet is not necessary.

The SCM is the large neck muscle that runs from the mastoid process (close to the ear), all the way down to the sternum. Its function is to rotate and tilt the head. When the SCM is tight on one side it causes the head to tilt in that direction and rotate to the opposite direction. For example, if the right SCM is tight, the child's head will tilt to the right and rotate to the left. Now, there are exceptions to every rule and sometimes a child's head will tilt and rotate to the same side, but for the most part, torticollis follows the previously mentioned pattern.

The cause of the musculature imbalance could be related to how the child was positioned in the womb, positioning following birth during sleep or resting, and/or if the child is not getting the necessary amount of tummy time. Most of the time, a parent or a pediatrician notice the child's head is flat on one side or on the back or notice a slight tilt of the neck/head in photographs.

The treatment for torticollis is effective. Weekly physical therapy usually takes 6-12 weeks, depending on the severity. There's also a home exercise program of daily stretching. 

Want more info or to schedule an appointment?

Contact our office to schedule a free phone consult with a Child and Family Development physical therapist. 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

 Click here to read more about torticollis on the National Institute of Health website.

Click here and here to read more about tummy time on our blog. 

Click here to register for our June 8 New Take On Tummy Time free seminar.

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Gail Fennimore, Katie Eggleston, Blake Templeton

Erin Krueger, physical therapist and clinical supervisor, celebrates 9 years at C&FD

Tuesday, Dec 20, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Erin Krueger

Erin Krueger DPT ATRIC is a physical therapist and Clinical Supervisor at Child and Family Development. She is celebrating years this month.   

Erin enjoys working with children to make movement fun and meaningful!  She works at both locations as well as Harris YMCA indoor pool. Each year, she adds new skills to her “toolbox” to best deliver PT, using a variety of treatment methods.  It is very important that PT is advantageous to the child not only in the office, but also at home, in school and in the community. 

A colleague shares:  

I can’t say enough about Erin. She is brilliant and knowledgeable. She has a good understanding of the body and how it works together as a whole. She is creative and crafty. The kids love her because she is fun and animated. We love her as our supervisor because she is compassionate and has the perspective of a well tenured therapist!

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger

Physical Therapy Focus: Using Water To Improve Motor Skills by Erin Krueger DPT ATRIC

Wednesday, Oct 26, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

October is National Physical Therapy Month and we are celebrating with the APTA #choosePT

Each physical therapist on our staff of 6 will share bit of expertise, including Erin Krueger DPT!

Erin is certified by the Aquatic Therapy & Rehab Institute (ATRI).  She offers aquatic therapy at the Harris YMCA and often recommends water as a modailty to improve function and motor skills for children, teens and young adults.   Here's why:

As a kiddo, there isn’t much better than being in a pool! Therapists and parents can use that to our advantage when developing gross motor skills!

The water is unique in that it provides multi-planar movement with resistance in every direction. The child receives increased sensory stimulation and proprioceptive awareness, as well as safety during activities such as gait training.

Just moving in the water can increase overall strength and flexibility and affect muscle tone.  By creating activities in the water specific for each child we target upper body, lower body, or core strength as needed.  And let’s face it – moving in the water is way more fun than doing exercises on land!

We also use AquaStretch principles to increase range of motion, reduce fascial and muscular restrictions and improve symmetry throughout the body. It also allows for freedom of movement, which may be restricted on land.

The hydrostatic pressure of the water increases proprioceptive and sensory input which varies with the depth of the water.  This pressure is calming and helps children have more awareness of where their body is with movement patterns. 

Interested in getting your feet wet? Read more about our aquatic therapy services here.

Learn more about Child and Family Development physical therapists on our website and our blog.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

Read More

Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger

National Physical Therapy Month #choosePT

Friday, Sep 30, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

October is National Physical Therapy Month and we are celebrating with the APTA #choosePT

Pediatric physical therapy is not just rehabilitation of injuries or therapy for “little adults”. While it certainly includes rehabilitation from sports injuries, post-surgery, broken bones and other conditions, it more commonly addresses “habilitation” rather than “re-habilitation”. That is, we are working with children to develop gross motor skills for the first time, rather than regain skills after a loss.  This “habilitation” often occurs when there is a gross motor delay related to late crawling and late walking.  At times, a delay is present in conjunction with a medical diagnosis, such as cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, mitochondrial disorder and spina bifida, to name just a few.

STAFF:

MIDTOWN OFFICE

Gail Fennimore PT, PCS, C/NDT

Jill Pfund DPT

Amy Sturkey LPT, C/NDT

PINEVILLE OFFICE

Katie Eggleston DPT

Erin Krueger DPT, ATRIC

Jessica Turchin MPT, ATRIC

SPECIALTY SERVICES INCLUDE:

  • Adaptive Equipment Assessment & Management
  • Aquatic Therapy at Harris YMCA
  • Constraint Induced Movement Therapy
  • Craniosacral Therapy (CST)
  • Karate Groups
  • Kinesiotaping® & Strapping
  • Learning To Ride A Bike
  • Neurodevelopmental Treatment™ (NDT)
  • Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES)
  • Pelvic Floor Dysfunction
  • Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation
  • Serial Casting
  • Sports Rehab & Training
  • Total Motion Release® (TMR)

Learn more about our physical therapists on our website and our blog.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

Read More

Topics: Amy Sturkey, Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Gail Fennimore, Katie Eggleston

Summer 2016 Aquatic Therapy at the Harris YMCA

Wednesday, Jun 8, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development continues pool-based physical therapy at the Harris YMCA!

We have offered aquatic therapy for more than 10 years and three physical therapists will be in the water this summer:

Erin (Harkins) Krueger, DPT, ATRIC
Katie Eggleston, DPT
 Jessica Turchin, LPT, ATRIC (upon her return from leave)

Pool therapy is a great complement to a physical therapy or occupational therapy intervention, in addition to regular land based therapies. 

  • The aquatic medium provides a number of unique properties that are almost impossible to replicate on land. 
  • The hydrostatic pressure of the water really helps our pediatric patients with body awareness and sensory integration.  Not to mention the undeniable aid with postural support for not only standing, but also for breathing! 
  • The buoyancy aids in off weighting the body to make coordination of activities much easier, as it can be used to lessen the strength required to perform a movement successfully.  Many people learn to walk first in the water and then on land. 
  • The confidence they have in the water is remarkable.  Imagine seeing a 7 year old motor plan and successfully walk for the first time in the water - now that 10 year old is walking independently on land! 

For the last 6 years, we have partnered with th Harris YMCA in Charlotte near South Park Mall.   The indoor pool has several features that are especially therapeutic including:

  • zero tide entrance, like walking into the ocean
  • whirlpool, with variable resistance and pressure 
  • heated water
  • floating equipment and toys

Click here to read more about the benefits of aquatic therapy.  

Read the C&FD blog

Read More

Topics: Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Katie Eggleston

Physical therapy and chronic pain in children and teens

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 by Child & Family Development

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger

C&FD celebrates 8 years with Erin Harkins, physical therapist

Tuesday, Dec 8, 2015 by Child & Family Development

 team_harkins1215.jpg

Erin Harkins DPT ATRIC marks 8 years of tenure this month! She is a physical therapist and the clinical supervisor for the occupational therapy, physical therapy and speech therapy teams.  

Erin made her own TOP 10 list of reasons she loves to work at Child and Family Development: 

10) One day a week, I get to play in the pool.

9)  Hearing children laugh.

8)  I can jump on a trampoline during the work day!

7)  Watching parents’ eyes full of amazement at what their children can do.

6)  Who else can ride bikes around the halls at work?

5)  Endless singing.

4)  I have a swing in my office!

3)  Problem solving to make a child as efficient as possible.

2)  Working with a staff dedicated to improving the lives of children in our community.

1)  The smiles on the faces of children learning and growing!  

Read more about her expertise here.     

Happy C&FD Anniversary!

Want to learn more about out team? 

Click here to sign up for  C&FD NEWS

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger

Physical therapist approved holiday gifts for 1-year-old kids

Wednesday, Nov 25, 2015 by Child & Family Development

The holiday season is approaching! Are you trying to come up with some good gift ideas for kids? 

                     

Our physical therapy team made a list of motor milestones and related toys to consider for a 1-year-old child.

12-21 months old

Considerations/ Milestones Toys
  • begins pulling to stand
  • creeps
  • puts objects into and out of container
  • enjoys placing things on head
  • looks at and explores objects with hands
  • push toys
  • plastic nesting or stacking containers
  • cups
  • balls
  • blocks - small and brightly colored
  • baskets
  • boxes - simple ones to open and close

18-21 months old

Considerations/ Milestones Toys
  • needs interesting variety
  • likes to move and climb on things
  • constantly on the move; short attention span
  • more aware of people
  • begins to talk more readily
  • pull toys
  • pots and pans
  • sand toys
  • water toys
  • dolls
  • hammer toys
  • sturdy books with large colored pictures
  • stuffed toys
  • large blocks
  • toy telephone
  • large beads to string
  • simple shape sorter

Our team of 7 physical therapists always recommend home activities for clients to expedite progress.  Wondering about your little one's early development? 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Gail Fennimore

C&FD PTs are celebrating the APTA Physical Therapy Day of Service

Wednesday, Oct 14, 2015 by Child & Family Development

    

Our team of 7 physical therapists is celebrating the APTA Physical Therapy Day Of Service! 

As part of National Physical Therapy Month (NPTM) celebration, members of our team will be busy in the Charlotte community supporting others.  Making a difference in the lives of patients and clients is what physical therapy is all about. Yet, transforming lives does not stop in our office.

You will see the Child and Family Development team at:

Visit our Facebook and Twitter pages to see the PT team in action this Saturday.   #PTTransforms #PTDOS 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

 

  

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger

C&FD PTs are celebrating National Physical Therapy Month!

Friday, Oct 9, 2015 by Child & Family Development

 

Our team of 7 physical therapists is celebrating National Physical Therapy Month 2015!

MIDTOWN OFFICE  PINEVILLE OFFICE

Gail Fennimore PT PCS

Jill Pfund DPT

Amy Sturkey LPT 

Leslie Cordero DPT

Jessica Cornman DPT

Erin Harkins DPT ATRIC

Jessica Turchin MPT ATRIC

We provide services to children, teens and young adults with developmental, neurological and congenital impairments.  Services can be habilitative (learning a skill for the first time) or rehabilitative (becoming more proficient at a skill or relearning a skill).  We focus on improving and adapting a child's gross motor abilities.  

All of our therapists are licensed by the state of North Carolina. 

Child & Family Development physical therapists are in-network with many insurance plans, including Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC, Cigna, Medcost, North Carolina Medicaid, Primary Physician Care, South Carolina Medicaid and United Health Care.  Our clients also may pay privately and access out-of-network benefits.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

 

  

Read More

Topics: Amy Sturkey, Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Gail Fennimore

Physical Therapists lead Sports Readiness workshop at Harris YMCA

Monday, May 18, 2015 by Child & Family Development

 

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Topics: Erin Krueger, Gail Fennimore

Summertime Aquatic Therapy at the Harris YMCA

Wednesday, Apr 8, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development continues aquatic therapy at the Harris YMCA!

We have offered aquatic therapy for more than 10 years and three physical therapists will be in the water this summer:

Jessica Sapel, LPT, ATRIC
Erin Harkins, DPT, ATRIC
Jessica Braun, DPT 

Pool therapy is a great complement to a physical therapy or occupational therapy intervention, in addition to regular land based therapies. 

  • The aquatic medium provides a number of unique properties that are almost impossible to replicate on land. 
  • The hydrostatic pressure of the water really helps our pediatric patients with body awareness and sensory integration.  Not to mention the undeniable aid with postural support for not only standing, but also for breathing! 
  • The buoyancy aids in off weighting the body to make coordination of activities much easier, as it can be used to lessen the strength required to perform a movement successfully.  Many people learn to walk first in the water and then on land. 
  • The confidence they have in the water is remarkable.  Imagine seeing a 7 year old motor plan and successfully walk for the first time in the water - now that 10 year old is walking independently on land! 

For the last 5 years, we have partnered with the Harris YMCA in Charlotte near South Park Mall.   The indoor pool has several features that are especially therapeutic including:

  • zero tide entrance, like walking into the ocean
  • whirlpool, with variable resistance and pressure 
  • heated water
  • floating equipment and toys

Click here to read more about the benefits of aquatic therapy.  

Read the C&FD blog

Read More

Topics: Jessica Turchin, Erin Krueger

Child and Family Development offers aquatic therapy: handling and positioning benefits

Monday, Mar 30, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development has offered aquatic therapy for more than 10 years and our first 2015 block has just begun! 

Two physical therapists lead this specialty service, both of whom are certified by the Aquatic Therapy and Rehabilitation Institute (ATRI):  

Pool therapy is a great complement to traditional physical therapy and occupational therapy intervention. The water provides a number of unique properties that are almost impossible to replicate on land.  

One therapeutic benefit of treating in the pool is the properties of the water allow therapists to position patients for handling and manual work in ways not possible on land.

For the last 5 years, we have partnered with the Harris YMCA in Charlotte near South Park Mall.   The indoor pool has several features that are especially therapeutic including:

  • zero tide entrance, like walking into the ocean
  • whirlpool, with variable resistance and pressure 
  • heated water
  • floating equipment and toys 

Read additional posts about the benefits of aquatic therapy. 
Read the C&FD blog

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Topics: Jessica Turchin, Erin Krueger

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insights is a helpful blog brought to you by Child & Family Development

Child & Family Development is a multi-disciplinary pediatric clinic serving the needs of Charlotte area children and their families.

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  • MIDTOWN OFFICE
  • 4012 Park Road, Suite 200
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.332.4834
  • PINEVILLE OFFICE
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  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.541.9080

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