Speech therapist, Hilary Frank completes picky eating food chaining course

Wednesday, Apr 5, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Hilary Frank MA CCC-SLP, speech therapist at Child and Family Development- Pineville, recently attended a course titled Treatment of Picky Eating and Problem Eaters Using Food Chaining Therapy from Northern Speech Services. 

This method trains pediatric therapists to evaluate medical, nutrition, oral motor, sensory and behavioral areas to determine the benefit of food chaining.  Food chaining is a framework of expanding nutrition and diet, starting with a list of safe and accepted foods, modifying/ altering these foods in very small ways and gradually proceeding to an expanded set of accepted and enjoyed foods.

A recent study including 10 children ages 1-14 revealed that the food chaining approach resulted in all children expanding their diet in all cases. This study concludes that Ffod chaining is an effective method in treating extreme food selectivity.

Hilary likes this program because it is evidence-based and encourages the child to feel successful within his/her eating environment. When we consider how many steps and skills are involved in “eating”, we can better understand and appreciate the supports certain children need along the way.    

She plans to use this training to provide helpful strategies for children and families focused on improving nutritional intake and expanding food acceptance. 

Read more about pediatric speech therapy, including feeding and swallowing services, here

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services, Hilary Frank

#WHO World Hearing Day: speech therapist sounds off! 

Friday, Mar 3, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Logan Carter MS CCC-SLP, speech therapist at the Midtown office in Charlotte, is sounding off about World Hearing Day, March 3!

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services, Logan Carter

Picky Eaters or Problem Feeders? Answers from occupational and speech therapists

Thursday, Mar 2, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Many moms and dads report that their child is a picky eater. It can be difficult to recognize if this is simply individual preference or an indication of a more significant concern.

Do you know a child described in this way?

  • She will only eat this one thing. (e.g. chicken nuggets, goldfish crackers)
  • My son gets upset at mealtime.
  • Dinner lasts for more than an hour.
  • He gags with any new foods.
  • My toddler stills eats baby food. 

Do you notice these symptoms?

  • Limited weight gain or growth
  • Dehydration and Failure to Thrive
  • Repeated respiratory infections or pneumonia
  • Nutrition concerns

Of course, adequate intake is an important component to health. Difficulties can create not only dietary problems, but also impact family dynamics and routines, social opportunities and wellness. When a medical diagnosis does not account for the difficulties, it may be a feeding or swallowing problem.

  • A feeding disorder includes problems with accepting and eating a healthy variety of foods.
  • A swallowing disorder includes problems with safely sucking, chewing and swallowing.

Feeding problems are characterized by:

  • A restricted range or variety of foods, usually less than 20 items
  • Resistance to adding new foods
  • Refusal of entire categories of food textures, temperatures or appearance
  • Crying when presented with new foods
  • Long feeding/ meal times (more than 30 minutes)
  • Frequent gagging or vomiting
  • Taking a few bites and then refusing more food

Swallowing problems are characterized by:

  • Difficulty breast feeding, drinking or chewing
  • Coughing or gagging during meals
  • Excessive drooling
  • Loss of food/liquid out of the mouth or nose
  • Difficulty chewing food before swallowing
  • Residual food in mouth after swallowing
  • Noisy breathing after swallowing 

Who can help?

Many of the speech therapists and occupational therapists at Child and Family Development have specialty training in both the sensory and motor aspects of a feeding or swallowing problem. We offer comprehensive evaluations and treatment.  Specialty services include:

  • Mealtime trials, one-on-one and groups
  • NeuroDevelopmental Treatment (NDT)™
  • Sequential Oral Sensory (SOS) Approach
  • Vital Stim™

Read more about speech therapy and occupational therapy services at Child and Family Development. 

Click here for a printable page about picky eating and problem feeding. 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist  Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Speech therapist, Melinda Schatz, celebrates 6 years at C&FD

Thursday, Feb 16, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Melinda Schatz!

Melinda Schatz, MA CCC-SLP is a speech therapist therapist at Child and Family Development- Midtown.  This month, she celebrates 6 years!   

She shares her secret professional joy:

"Working with children gives me a reason to play with all the cool new games and toys!"

Have fun!

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Topics: Melinda Schatz, C&FD Speech Therapy Services

Stuttering or Developmental Dysfluency? Info from our speech therapists

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2017 by Child & Family Development

WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN DYSFLUENCY AND STUTTERING?

As much as 80% of children have dysfluent speech during early childhood. It is not uncommon for kids to go back and forth between periods of fluency and dysfluency, especially when excited, tired or rushed. Usually, this is developmental dysfluency and will often disappear as a child masters articulation and communication skills.

For others, dysfluency will remain or will return in a more severe and long-lasting pattern called stuttering. This occurs when the natural flow of speech is interrupted. Usually, stuttering begins between the ages of 2-5, with a gradual onset. Although the exact cause is unknown, it is often genetic and a result of difficulty in coordinating the speech muscles in the presence of certain external demands. Risks and symptoms include:

  • Prolonging sounds
  • Inability to make certain sounds
  • Difficulty repeating sounds

FACTS ABOUT STUTTERING:

  • Affects about 1% of the world’s population
  • 4 times more common among boys than girls
  • Stuttering usually begins in childhood
  • Stuttering behaviors develop and vary throughout the lifespan
  • Many people report significant variability–sometimes stuttering a lot, sometimes a little
  • Stuttering can feel like out-of-control speech that is intermittent and unpredictable. This can cause embarrassment, anxiety and fear.

HOW TO HELP A CHILD WHO STUTTERS:

  • Don’t show a child if you are upset about his/her speech.
  • Look at a child when he/she is speaking and show by your expressions that you are interested in what he/she is saying.
  • Don’t supply words or interrupt. Let a child get his/her words out independently.
  • Don’t force a child to hurry by suggesting they talk faster or get to the point.
  • Don’t ask a child to stop and start over when he/she stutters.
  • Notice and minimize times of emotional tension when stuttering may be more severe.
  • Model a relaxed manner of speech. Remain calm, unhurried and reassuring.
  • Talk openly about stuttering if he/she expresses a desire to do so, but do not make a big issue about it.

HAVE A CONCERN?

  • Seek a qualified and experienced speech-language pathologist with expertise in this area.
  • Seek help as early as possible to educate both you and the child in the therapeutic early interventions that are most effective.
  • Under public law, stuttering is considered a disorder for which public schools are required to provide competent assistance to a child.

Click here to read more about speech therapy services at Child and Family Development. 

Click here for a printable page about stuttering and dysfluency.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist 

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services

Speech therapists share tips to encourage speech and language development

Thursday, Feb 9, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 

The Child and Family Development speech therapy team loves to work with little ones with emerging expressive and receptive language skills.  

Often, parents ask what they can do at home to help kids stay on track with development.    

Here are some ideas.  Choose and adapt the ones that are most appropriate for your child.

 

  • When your child initiates conversation, give him your full attention.
  • Use good speech that is clear and simple for your child to imitate.
  • Pause after speaking, giving the child time to respond and continue the conversation.
  • Repeat what your child says to indicate that you understand.  Build and expand on what he says. For example, your child says "Want juice" and you respond by saying "You want apple juice."
  • Make a scrapbook of favorite or familiar things by cutting out pictures or using photographs.  Group them into categories such as: things to ride, things to eat, things to eat as dessert, etc.  Create silly pictures by mixing and matching pictures.  For example, glue a picture of a dog behind the wheel of a car.  Talk about what is wrong with the picture and ways to "fix" it.  Count items pictured in a book.
  • Help your child understand and ask questions.  Play the yes/no game.  Ask questions like "Are you a boy?", "Are you Billy?" or "Can a cat fly?".  Encourage your child to make up questions for you. 
  • Ask questions that require a choice.  "Do you want an apple or a banana?" or "Will you wear the green shirt or the blue shirt today?".  Make sure to provide choices that are both acceptable so their choice can be realized.
  • Expand vocabulary.  For example, name body parts and identify what you do with them.  "This is my nose.  I can smell cookies.  I can smell flowers." You can expand this activity by asking "What do you smell with your nose?" Place familiar objects in a container.  Have the child remove an object, tell you what it is and how to use it.  "This is my ball.  I play with it and it bounces."  Encourage turn taking and modeling the response by doing the same.
  • Use photographs of familiar people and objects to retell what happened or make up a new story about the picture.  "I went to the park with my brother.  We played on the slide and the swing."
  • Continue to build vocabulary by introducing new words as you see a novel item/concept.  Examples might include something on television, in a book or in the community (park, church, store).
  • Use sequence words (first, last, next) as well as location words (under, beside, near) and opposites (up/down, in/out).
  • Offer a description/clue of an object and ask the child to identify it.  For example, "We sleep in it" (a bed), "It is used to clean the floor." (a broom).
  • Help your child follow 2 or 3-step directions such as "Go to your room and bring me a book."
  • Encourage your child to give directions.  For example, you follow his directions, such as what to put on his toast or how to build a Lego tower. 

You don't need more or special time to practice speech and language.  Incorporate these activities into what is happening already- all day, everyday. 

  • Name objects, utensils and foods as you prepare meals in the kitchen.
  • Name the room you are in and what you are doing there. For example, "The bathroom has a sink, a tub and a toilet.  It's time to take a bath.  We need soap and a towel. You are out of the tub.  It is time to get in."

 Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

Read more about our speech therapy services here.  

Visit the Resources tab on our website to access helpful developmental charts. 

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services

How to Get the Most Out Of Therapy- Insurance and Financial Management

Friday, Feb 3, 2017 by Child & Family Development

This is the third of three HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OUT OF THERAPY AT CHILD AND FAMILY DEVELOPMENT posts. This post is about: Insurance and Financial Management

Getting started or managing a change:

  • Understand insurance benefits via discussions with us and your funding source.
  • Understand all insurance and other health care options that your employer may be offer and compare what is available. Compare plans when possible.      
  • Anticipate your out-of-pocket costs for the year. We can help project these figures.
  • Determine what tax preferred ways there are to fund out-of-pocket costs.
  • Obtain physician prescriptions to support therapy.
  • Communicate with C&FD Client Services Team:
    • Notify us anytime there is a change in insurance benefit or plan.
    • Notify us anytime there is a change in guarantor or policy holder.
    • Notify us anytime there is a change in primary doctors or specialists.
    • Coordinate insurance benefits for multiple services, as some plans have daily limitations.
    • Plan ahead for annual visit maximums.

At each visit:

  • Check in with the client services team prior to each visit.
    • Checking in notifies the therapist that you have arrived.
    • Checking in ensures that you stay current with insurance coverage of services and can apply your co-pay or coinsurance to your visit.
  • We use American Medical Association (AMA) diagnosis and treatment codes that all insurance companies and professionals can reference.
    • A therapist selects applicable procedure codes based on what happens during each session. Some sessions may include equipment checks, caregiver training, re-evaluation of progress to goals, or other services such as splinting or taping. Therefore, out-of-pocket costs may vary from one session to another.

For the full document, click here.

GET STARTED NOW

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services

Teaching sign language to kids, tips from our speech therapy team

Thursday, Feb 2, 2017 by Child & Family Development

The Child and Family Development speech therapy team helps young children who have expressive and receptive language difficulties.  Often, a speech therapist will recommend teaching some basic sign language to expedite improved communication.

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services

How to Get the Most Out Of Therapy- Home Programs and Follow-Through

Friday, Jan 27, 2017 by Child & Family Development

This is the second of three HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OUT OF THERAPY AT CHILD AND FAMILY DEVELOPMENT posts. This post is about: Home Programs and Follow-Through

A therapist will share information and recommendations regularly.  

  • Review the evaluation results, treatment goals and progress reports. Ask questions!
  • Talk with the therapist at each session. Observe some or all of the treatment sessions.
  • Follow the home program. Often, you can incorporate the therapeutic activities into what you are already doing.
  • Follow therapist recommendations for other services and complete these appointments promptly.
  • Allow professionals to share information with one another by completing an Authorization for Release of Information with a member of our client services team.
  • Your therapist may suggest a variety of treatment techniques and schedule changes over the course of treatment. Have a regular and open dialogue about these suggestions.

For the full document, click here.

GET STARTED NOW

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services

Rethinking tummy time, expert advice from Ann Guild MACCCSLP C/NDT

Thursday, Jan 26, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Ann Guild MA CCC-SLP C/NDT is a speech therapist at Child and Family Development- Midtown in Charlotte.  Ann is our most tenured and experienced speech- language pathologist on staff.  She has much advanced training including Neurodevelopmental Treatment™ (NDT) certification, which qualifies her to incorporate neuromotor components into her evaluation and treatment of children and teens.

Ann has prepared a helpful guide for families of little ones that is all about gravity and includes important body positions for holding, eating and resting. She shares:

A lot has been written about tummy time and how to help parents be more comfortable putting their infants on their tummies. Despite all the advice, parents remain reluctant to leave their crying infants on their tummies for very long.  The problem is not the importance of tummy time, but in the name itself. Tummy time implies that infants need to be put down on their tummies for extended periods during the day. The more important consideration is the need to provide options during the day that counteract or balance the extended period of time spent on their backs at night.

When the force of gravity is coming at an infant’s face and mouth during back lying, the tongue is pulled back into the throat. If during the day, the child stays on their back or reclined in a carrier, the tongue cannot come forward into the mouth for eating and later for talking. They become overwhelmed by gravity.

 BACK TO SLEEP

 SUPINE IN A CARRIER

Babies in daycare are especially at risk. Helping parents advocate for positioning options for their babies can be big step in helping these children thrive.

More common positioning and carrying that keeps the child vulnerable to the effect of gravity are pictured below. These positions allow gravity to pull the tongue back in the mouth making eating difficult.

 CARRYING IN SUPINE

 FEEDING IN SUPINE

 SUPINE IN BASSINET FOR NAPS

 SUPINE IN PILLOW FOR NAPS

In my practice as a Speech-Language Pathologist, the children I see most are otherwise typical babies who have difficulty taking the bottle or breast or later making the transition to solid food. Their difficulty comes from the force of gravity pulling the tongue back in the mouth during their many hours of back lying at night and sitting reclined in a carrier or lying on their backs during the day. We can eliminate this feeding difficulty for many typical infants by simply focusing on positioning, carrying, holding, and feeding them in positions that minimize or balance the effect of gravity on the mouth.  When we see otherwise typical babies at 3-4 months, who are not eating well, we can tell the moms that there is no food aversion or eating problem. We can say that their baby is overwhelmed by gravity.

If the feeding issues have already begun, they can be reversed by concentrating on positioning. The need to focus on positioning is most important for the first 3-4 months. Once children start to move and roll, they learn to manage gravity by themselves. If they have been left in supine, this may not happen without help.

Here are some examples of positioning and carrying options that allow the tongue to come forward in the mouth for eating and eventually for talking.

 CARRYING ON SHOULDER

 PRONE IN LAP

 PRONE IN LAP

 PRONE ON QUILT IN LAP

 ON MOM'S SHOULDER

 CARRYING IN SIDE LYING OVER MOM'S ARM

 ON MOM'S CHEST

 IN CARRIER WRAP

 NAP ON BOPPY

 NAP ON MOM'S CHEST

 FEEDING IN SITTING

When parents understand the process and are successful and creative in carrying, holding, positioning, and feeding their babies in a way that balances the time spent on their backs at night; they are empowered and their infants thrive.

Read more about Ann Guild's expertise and services here.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

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Topics: Ann Guild, C&FD Speech Therapy Services

Child and Family Development welcomes speech therapist, Hilary Frank

Wednesday, Jan 25, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Hilary Frank MA CCC-SLP, joined the Child and Family Development team this month.      

Hilary is a licensed speech therapist with experience as an early education teacher as well as a SLP in outpatient and public school settings. She enjoys helping people grow their expressive and receptive language skills to be effective and independent communicators.

Hilary received her MA in Speech Pathology- Audiology from South Carolina State University and an undergraduate in elementary education from University of Central Florida. 

She works at the Pineville office.

Welcome Hilary!  

Read more about our speech therapy services here.       

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

 

 

 

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services, Hilary Frank

How to Get the Most Out Of Therapy- Appointments and Scheduling

Friday, Jan 20, 2017 by Child & Family Development

This is the first of three HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OUT OF THERAPY AT CHILD AND FAMILY DEVELOPMENT posts. This post is about: Appointments and Scheduling 

Treatment will be determined by you & your therapist based on several factors, including:

  • the needs of your child
  • time constraints
  • available insurance benefits or other financial resources

Determine an appointment time that really works with your family’s schedule.

  • Attend all appointments and reschedule any missed appointments.
  • Consistent attendance = progress!
  • Regular attendance is required to retain a permanent appointment time.
  • Consider make-ups or coverage with another therapist if your primary therapist is not available.
  • Review our Financial Policy and Cancellation Policy for more information.

For the full document, click here.

GET STARTED NOW

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services

How to Get the Most Out Of Therapy- experts, appointments, benefits and more!

Friday, Jan 13, 2017 by Child & Family Development

It's a new year! Child and Family Development is accepting new clients for all 5 of our core services:

For the next few Fridays, read this blog series on HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OUT OF THERAPY that will cover these topics:

  • Appointments and Scheduling
  • Home Programs and Follow-Through
  • Insurance and Financial Management

For the full document, click here.

To begin, just learn a little bit more about us:

Spend some time here. You will be surrounded by a dynamic group of people - those who work here and those who visit us.  Our focus is to maximize the potential of every child with a holistic approach to therapy. We believe that a child of any age is connected to his family, his friends and his community and makes a valuable contribution to our world.

For more than 36 years, C&FD has been working closely with children and families, physicians, schools and many others in the community.

Our offices are inviting places. The space is casual and family-friendly. We want you to feel welcome and comfortable. Our lobbies are cozy and our therapy rooms are fun. It is not uncommon to find moms, dads, siblings or other caregivers taking it easy on the lobby sofa or getting involved in the therapy rooms. We’ve found the balance of a professional office and an enjoyable place for all.

Our experienced and multidisciplinary team assists families with a wide variety of concerns and questions. Extended education and training enables us to help many people in extraordinary ways. We work with children and young adults of all ages-- from newborns to college age.

Families visit us for variety of reasons. Often, a pediatrician or teacher identifies a concern. Other times, a parent has questions about a child’s abilities and development. Some families have concerns about specific diagnoses, such as ADHD, autism, Cerebral Palsy, Down syndrome, learning disabilities and sensory processing difficulties. Others have questions about typical developmental milestones, school readiness, academic achievement and learning style. We are prepared to assist you.

Our mission statement says it all- to provide comprehensive, quality and integrated service to you.

GET STARTED NOW

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services

Child & Family Development 2017 Funding Source Summary

Tuesday, Jan 3, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Happy New Year!  In 2017, Child and Family Development continues to participate in these plans at both our Charlotte/Midtown and Pineville offices:

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY, PHYSICAL THERAPY AND SPEECH THERAPY

Aetna º Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC º Cigna º Healthgram º Medcost º NC Medicaid º Optum Health º SC Medicaid (OT, PT) º United Healthcare & Out-Of-Network and Private Pay

PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES

Aetna º Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC º Healthgram & Out-Of-Network and Private Pay

EDUCATIONAL SERVICES

Private Pay

Our Client Services Team can help you understand your benefits.

Give us a call to get started

GET STARTED NOW

 

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services

FUNctional holiday gift ideas from the C&FD Speech Therapy team

Wednesday, Dec 21, 2016 by Child & Family Development

The multidisciplinary pediatric therapy team at Child and Family Development is rounding up some FUNctional gift ideas for the 2016 holiday season!

Here are some suggestions from our speech therapists:

  • Play Dough Factory Retro Set: An open ended toy with tons of opportunities for generating language. 
  • Tough & Feel Books: Great for engaging little ones in books. You can name objects and talk about the pictures as you look at the pages. 
  • Bubbles: Fun for everyone! Bubbles can be used to work on requesting and early sounds.  Also help with oral motor skills.
  • Zingo by Think Fun: A twist on Bingo with lots of objects to name.  Also works on matching memory and concentration skills.
  • Parum Pum Pum Drum: Musical instruments are great for sparking interest and attention.  Encourage your child to participate in songs with movement, gestures or words. 
  • Headbandz by Spin Master: A fun game for asking questions, describing objects and categorizing.  

Click below to find more new posts throughout December by searching HOLIDAY.

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services

FUNctional holiday language gift ideas from the C&FD Speech Therapy team

Friday, Dec 16, 2016 by Child & Family Development

The multidisciplinary pediatric therapy team at Child and Family Development is rounding up some FUNctional gift ideas for the 2016 holiday season!

Here are some language development suggestions from our speech therapists:

  • What's In Ned's Head by Fat Brain Toys: Work on asking questions, sound production and describing objects.  The gross factor makes it extra appealing to kids.  It even comes with blank cards so you can add your own objects to target specific sounds or vocabulary. 
  • Magnetic Game- Peter & Pauline's Farm by Fat Brain Toys: Good for teaching vocabulary, following directions, spatial concepts and telling stories.
  • Lock & Roll Rescue Truck Garage by Fat Brain Toys: Lots of language can be targeted with this one including spatial concepts (in/out, open/close), colors, actions and vocabulary. Great for imaginative play. 
  • Melissa & Doug Fold & Go Wooden Dollhouse: Introduces vocabulary for the home, basic concepts and actions (sleep, cook, wash, sit) as well as encourages pretend play.
  • Mr. Potato Head Silly Suitcase by Playskool: A classic toy for teaching body parts and basic concepts.

Click below to find more new posts throughout December by searching HOLIDAY.

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services

FUNctional holiday communciation gift ideas from the C&FD Speech Therapy team

Friday, Dec 9, 2016 by Child & Family Development

The multidisciplinary pediatric therapy team at Child and Family Development is rounding up some FUNctional gift ideas for the 2016 holiday season!

Here are some suggestions from our speech therapists:

  • Feed The Woozle (Peaceable Kingdom): This game can be used for social language skills, following directions and as carryover practice for articulation.  Kids love feeding this silly, orange creature!
  • Talking Cubes (Alex Toys): A fun toy for encouraging social interaction or a silly way to practice sounds!
  • Stamp & Sort Mailbox (Melissa & Doug): perfect for pretend play, asking/answering questions and basic concepts.
  • Rory's Story Cubes (Gamewright): Roll the dice and make up a story.  Great for working on producing narratives and encouraging creative thinking
  • Express It Buddy (Discovery Toys): A soft toy with different Velcro features that can be combined to make different facial expressions.  This toy can be used to help understand and express feelings and for imaginative play.
  • Discovery Putty (Fun and Function): Kids will have fun finding and talking about the objects hiding in the putty.  
  • Buddy's Balloon Launch (Fat Brain Toys): This exciting game can teach cause and effect, turn taking, cooperation and sequencing.  It can also be used as an incentive to encourage continued participation in an activity.  
  • Bunny Peek-A-Boo (Fat Brain Toys): Move the pieces to match the picture on the cards.  Great for teaching understanding and use of spatial concepts.
  • More suggestions:
    • Kitchen play sets
    • Blocks
    • Dolls and accessories
    • Wind up toys
    • Shape sorter
    • Puppets

Helpful Hints:

  • Choose open ended toys to encourage language
  • Skip toys that have batteries
  • Look for toys that are fun to play with a partner or a group to encourage social interaction
  • Avoid toys that specifically teach academic concepts (letter, number, color) for early language learners
  • Sometimes the best learning occurs with no toy at all; speech and language can be a part of any daily activity

Click below to find more new posts throughout December by searching HOLIDAY.

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services

Don't Take Our Word For It! Knowledge & Experience

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Ann Guild MA CCC-SLP is a speech therapist and a swallowing/ feeding difficulties specialist at Child and Family Development- Midtown office. 

A recent client survey provided this praise: "We were extremely pleased with the speech therapy our son received.  Ann is very knowledgeable and experienced.”

Read more about Ann's approach to pediatric therapy here.       

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist  

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Topics: Ann Guild, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Testimonials

Improving your child's language: tips from an expert speech therapist

Wednesday, Nov 2, 2016 by Child & Family Development


Stephanie Tolley, MS CCC-SLP
is a speech therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development.

She often shares basic tips with parents and caregivers about how to improve a child's communication skills:

WHAT TO DO

  • Use short sentences: Even if comprehension is good, speaking in 2-5 word sentences may allow a child to focus on the words more easily.
  • Talk often: help a child learn by describing everyday activities as they happen (preparing meals, getting into the car, playing at the park)
  • Talk about what YOU are doing ("I'm fastening your seatbelt", "I'm pushing the swing")
  • Talk about what THE CHILD is doing ("Drinking juice", "You are sitting in the back seat")
  • Accept the child's attempts to talk: Even if the words are not clear and sentences are not complete, respond or answer anway to reinforce the effort.
  • Expand on what the child says by repeating and adding more information: ("Mama eat", you say "Mom eats pizza")
  • Introduce new words: Talk about what you see in the environment, including naming people, objects and actions happening around you.
  • Expect the child to talk: If the child doesn't seem to know the words, provide a model and encourage a response: ("Want juice?" and wait for child to say "Juice")

WHAT NOT TO DO

  • Don't ask a lot of questions, such as "What's this?"; Children learn more easily when adults talk with them.  Instead, label and describe "You have apple juice"
  • Don't ask a child to repeat; Rather than "Say book", you can label and describe "Here is your train book"
  • Don't anticipate the child's needs; Create opportunities for child to request or describe on his own ("Juice please", "Turn the page")

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

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Topics: Stephanie Tolley, C&FD Speech Therapy Services

Speech & Language Milestones: 19-24 month olds

Friday, Sep 23, 2016 by Child & Family Development

What speech and language skills should my 19-24 month old have?*names objects

  • uses two word combinations (noun + verb)
  • uses simple prepositions "on" "in" "under"
  • family understand approximately 75% of what child says verbally
  • vocabulary understanding and expression grows to 150-300 words
  • uses some pronouns "I", "me", "my"
  • points to body parts
  • follows simple commands
  • identifies common objects and their use
  • has poor volume control

Connect with a pediatric speech therapist at Child and Family Development to learn more about development. 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

The Child and Family Development website contains a more detailed developmental chart and checklists from the CDC here.  

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services

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Child & Family Development is a multi-disciplinary pediatric clinic serving the needs of Charlotte area children and their families.

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  • Charlotte, NC
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  • 704.541.9080

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