Receptive Language in the Fist Year

Saturday, Jul 14, 2018 by Child & Family Development

Receptive language is what your child understands. It is an important part of early language development and is often forgotten. Some examples of early receptive language skills include following 1-2 step directions, identifying objects/pictures, recognizing actions in pictures/verbs in play, and identifying body parts/clothing. Below is a list of receptive language milestones for children ages 0-12 months (information taken from The Early Intervention Kit, LinguiSystems).

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services

Adventures in Veggieland!

Friday, Jun 29, 2018 by Child & Family Development

 

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services

Happy Anniversary Ann Guild!

Wednesday, May 30, 2018 by Child & Family Development

May is Better Speech and Hearing Month.  This May, however, is extra special for us as it marks Ann Guild's 29th year with Child & Family Development.  Ann has been supporting families, sharing her expertise and working with children at our office since 1989.  Ann specializes in working with babies and young children with neuro-motor disorders, feeding difficulties and apraxia.  We are grateful to celebrate such a wonderful therapist and colleague this month.  Happy C&FD Anniversary Ann!

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Topics: Ann Guild, C&FD Speech Therapy Services

May is Better Hearing & Speech Month!

Tuesday, May 22, 2018 by Child & Family Development

The month of May is dedicated to providing opportunities to raise awareness for a variety of communication disorders.

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services

Why is my child not talking yet?

Friday, Feb 2, 2018 by Child & Family Development

"My child is two and she is not talking yet."

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services

Multidisciplinary Feeding Clinic at C&FD

Wednesday, Dec 20, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development is pleased to expand our services to include: Multidisciplinary Feeding Evaluations & Clinic Services 

This specialty clinic offers both multidisciplinary evaluations and treatment services for children, ages 4-16 years old, with feeding disorders and/or extreme picky eating. This service is appropriate for children or adolescents who have been formally diagnosed with Avoidance/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (AFRID).

This clinic occurs at our Pineville office with an expert diagnostic team including: 

• psychologists and counselors 
• occupational therapists
• speech therapists  

Feeding problems are characterized by:

• A restricted range or variety of foods, usually less than 20 items
• Resistance to adding new foods
• Refusal of categories of food textures, temperatures or appearance
• Long feeding/ meal times (more than 30 minutes)
• Frequent gagging or vomiting
• Taking a few bites and then refusing more food
 

The Sequential Oral Sensory Feeding Approach™ (SOS) model will work to expand children’s food repertoire, improve oral motor skills, and develop socially acceptable feeding behaviors. It is designed to help increase a child’s comfort with eating both in the home and community. The focus of treatment will be on food exploration in a comfortable and sensory supportive environment and will also include a parent education component. Many of our speech therapists and occupational therapists have specialty training in both the sensory and motor aspects of a feeding or swallowing problem. Treatment for feeding disorders can help a child become a functional eater. Treatment strategies include work on oral sensory awareness, motor execution and motor planning tasks, social modeling, structured meal and snack times, positive reinforcement and home programming. These services are designed to provide parents with the training they need to target their child’s eating strategies outside of the clinic and produce positive outcomes. 

EVALUATIONS: The evaluation would include an examination of the structures and movements in the mouth, observation of feeding behaviors, observations of the influences of respiration and posture, and informal assessment of nutrition. Food and drink trials are often included in an assessment. Review of medical history form and other records which are shared prior to first appointment. Standardized behavioral questionnaires are provided for parents and teaching/daycare staff to gain information on skills in the home/school settings and to identify any psychological symptoms which warrant specific treatment (e.g., anxiety). Consultative time is an essential portion of this specialty service and is an out of pocket expense.

• Intake 1-hour diagnostic interview with psychologist for parents only
• Testing Session: 1 ½ hour evaluation with both speech therapist and occupational therapist. This allows comprehensive observation of skills and represents a best-practice approach to evaluation services for feeding therapy.
• Interpretive Parent Conference (IPC): 1 hour appointment with parents and members of the diagnostic team during which parents are able to thoroughly understand their child’s development and feeding therapy plan. A written report includes findings, diagnostic impressions and recommendations.

Estimated evaluation cost: $2,381.00 (partially billable to insurance); may be billable to insurance ($1,205.00) and out-of-pocket only ($270.00). 

FEEDING CLINIC SERVICES: The clinic starts with a parent interview with a psychologist or counselor to review the child’s medical history and gather detailed information about the child’s feeding history, mealtime environment, and related behaviors. A behavioral questionnaire is provided to parents and teachers/childcare providers to gather information from both settings. The feeding clinic provides a 12 week structured curriculum to provide parents with all of the skills and knowledge they need to continue to produce positive outcomes after the clinic ends.

The clinic services are a 2-pronged approach that provides individualized intervention. Parents meet with psychologists and counselors without their children present to learn detailed strategies that work to change their child’s behaviors and approach to food (approximately 8 sessions). Parents and children also participate in several joint sessions to learn effective interventions to learn coping strategies and reduce anxiety (approximately 4 sessions).

Children work 1:1 with a feeding therapist using the (SOS) model with a focus on safe food exploration in a comfortable and sensory supportive environment. This evidence-based program includes a comprehensive parent education component, and parents are expected to participate on all feeding sessions in order to understand their child’s feeding behavior and effective management interventions.

A parent only summary session is provided at the end of the 12 week course with both feeding therapist and psychologist/counselor to review progress and provide a specific plan for next steps.

Both rehabilitation and psychological treatment is billable to insurance. Psychologists and counselors are in-network with Aetna and BCBS. Deductibles and copays apply. An out of pocket charge is included in the registration for services which covers consultative time for treatment team members to meet to discuss each case in detail.

Estimated clinic services cost: billable to insurance – 12 weekly therapy sessions for both psychology and rehab services and self-pay only - $ 336.00

Read more about the C&FD multidisciplinary feeding clinic here

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Psychological Services

Sensory Storytime

Wednesday, Dec 13, 2017 by Child & Family Development

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services

Speech & Language Social Skills groups

Tuesday, Dec 12, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 

Kristin Lyman MA CCC-SLP is pleased to offer SPEECH & LANGUAGE SOCIAL SKILLS GROUPS at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development. Speech therapists work with kids and teens to improve social skills. When there are shared goals, groups can be formed to expand opportunities for practice and friendships.

Objectives Social skills groups are for children who struggle during interactions with others. Participants focus on practical conversational skills, such as:

  • Greetings
  • Turn-taking
  • Expressing yourself
  • Initiating and maintaining conversations
  • Social awareness
  • Emotions
  • Reading nonverbal language from others
  • Problem solving difficult situations

In the group setting, speech therapists facilitate the interactions to help children understand how to navigate various social situations. Sessions involve a variety of activities including lessons, turn-taking games, social stories, and role-playing for application of skills.  Groups are typically formed by age, but communication skills are considered too:

  • 6 years old and under
  • 7-14 years old
  • 15+ years old

Here's what some parents say about these groups:

  • “<My child> has achieved a refreshing confidence and a fearless daring spirit in his language skills.”
  • “<Our teen> has not only increased his speech abilities substantially, he has made a great friend!”

Scheduling These groups are ongoing, so new clients may join in at anytime. Typically, up to 4 participants are in a group.   

Cost Families may use available insurance benefits. Regular deductibles and co-pays apply. Prior Authorization, medical necessity approval and evaluations are required, as applicable by funding source. Families may also pay privately. Group services are $54/ session.      

Contact

Kristin Lyman, MA CCC-SLP, Speech-Language Pathologist, 704.372.9653 ext. 213

Click here to view and print the information page.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services, Kristin Lyman

Multidisciplinary developmental evaluations at C&FD

Friday, Dec 8, 2017 by Child & Family Development

We are pleased to expand our services to include: Multidisciplinary Developmental Evaluations for children ages 24 months-4 years

Our multidisciplinary infant-toddler diagnostic team offers these specialty evaluations at our Midtown Child and Family Development office. The diagnostic evaluation assesses domains for language and communication skills, early cognitive development, adaptive functioning, play skills and symptoms associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Expert diagnostic team:
Psychologists, Ashley Kies PhD or Devon Redmond PhD
Speech-Language Therapist, Melinda Schatz MA CCC-SLP

Usual and customary tools:  
• Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, Second Edition (ADOS-2®)
• Autism Spectrum Rating Scales (ASRS™)
• Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition (Bayley-III®) 
• Preschool Language Scales, Fifth Edition (PLS-5™)
• Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Third Edition (Vineland-3™)

Estimated cost: $2,381.00 (partially billable to insurance)

Read more about multidisciplinary evaluations. 

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Topics: Melinda Schatz, Devon Redmond, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Psychological Services, Ashley Kies

CFD Welcomes a New Speech Therapist!

Tuesday, Dec 5, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services

Stuttering or Developmental Dysfluency? Info from our speech therapists

Monday, Nov 20, 2017 by Child & Family Development

WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN DYSFLUENCY AND STUTTERING?

As much as 80% of children have dysfluent speech during early childhood. It is not uncommon for kids to go back and forth between periods of fluency and dysfluency, especially when excited, tired or rushed. Usually, this is developmental dysfluency and will often disappear as a child masters articulation and communication skills.

For others, dysfluency will remain or will return in a more severe and long-lasting pattern called stuttering. This occurs when the natural flow of speech is interrupted. Usually, stuttering begins between the ages of 2-5, with a gradual onset. Although the exact cause is unknown, it is often genetic and a result of difficulty in coordinating the speech muscles in the presence of certain external demands. Risks and symptoms include:

  • Prolonging sounds
  • Inability to make certain sounds
  • Difficulty repeating sounds

FACTS ABOUT STUTTERING:

  • Affects about 1% of the world’s population
  • 4 times more common among boys than girls
  • Stuttering usually begins in childhood
  • Stuttering behaviors develop and vary throughout the lifespan
  • Many people report significant variability–sometimes stuttering a lot, sometimes a little
  • Stuttering can feel like out-of-control speech that is intermittent and unpredictable. This can cause embarrassment, anxiety and fear.

HOW TO HELP A CHILD WHO STUTTERS:

  • Don’t show a child if you are upset about his/her speech.
  • Look at a child when he/she is speaking and show by your expressions that you are interested in what he/she is saying.
  • Don’t supply words or interrupt. Let a child get his/her words out independently.
  • Don’t force a child to hurry by suggesting they talk faster or get to the point.
  • Don’t ask a child to stop and start over when he/she stutters.
  • Notice and minimize times of emotional tension when stuttering may be more severe.
  • Model a relaxed manner of speech. Remain calm, unhurried and reassuring.
  • Talk openly about stuttering if he/she expresses a desire to do so, but do not make a big issue about it.

HAVE A CONCERN?

  • Seek a qualified and experienced speech-language pathologist with expertise in this area.
  • Seek help as early as possible to educate both you and the child in the therapeutic early interventions that are most effective.
  • Under public law, stuttering is considered a disorder for which public schools are required to provide competent assistance to a child.

Click here to read more about speech therapy services at Child and Family Development. 

Click here for a printable page about stuttering and dysfluency.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist 

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services

PROMPT© speech therapy with Melinda Schatz

Wednesday, Nov 15, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 


Melinda Bumgardner Schatz MA CCC-SLP is a speech therapist at the Midtown office at Child and Family Development. She is one of a few Charlotte pediatric speech therapy professionals trained in PROMPT©, a technique which is often used with kids with motor speech difficulties. 

What does PROMPT© stand for? Prompts for Restructuring Oral Muscular Phonetic Targets

What is PROMPT©? It is a technique that involves manipulating/shaping the oro-motor structures to help produce sound. It provides multi-sensory information (tactile, auditory, visual) to the speech system.

What types of disorders does it treat? PROMPT© can be used with children and adults with varying speech disorders that are developmental or acquired. PROMPT can help people with apraxia, autism spectrum disorder, developmental delays, dysarthria, dysfluency, hearing impairment and phonological difficulties.

How to find more information about PROMPT©? Visit their website or email Melinda

Who can administer PROMPT©? Speech-Language Pathologists who are “trained” or “certified” 

Is PROMPT© right for your child?  Call 704-332-4834 to schedule a free intake with Melinda 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

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Topics: Melinda Schatz, C&FD Speech Therapy Services

Multidisciplinary Feeding Clinic at C&FD

Monday, Nov 13, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development is pleased to expand our services to include: Multidisciplinary Feeding Evaluations & Clinic Services 

This specialty clinic offers both multidisciplinary evaluations and treatment services for children, ages 4-16 years old, with feeding disorders and/or extreme picky eating. This service is appropriate for children or adolescents who have been formally diagnosed with Avoidance/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (AFRID).

This clinic occurs at our Pineville office with an expert diagnostic team including: 

• psychologists and counselors 
• occupational therapists
• speech therapists  

Feeding problems are characterized by:

• A restricted range or variety of foods, usually less than 20 items
• Resistance to adding new foods
• Refusal of categories of food textures, temperatures or appearance
• Long feeding/ meal times (more than 30 minutes)
• Frequent gagging or vomiting
• Taking a few bites and then refusing more food
 

The Sequential Oral Sensory Feeding Approach™ (SOS) model will work to expand children’s food repertoire, improve oral motor skills, and develop socially acceptable feeding behaviors. It is designed to help increase a child’s comfort with eating both in the home and community. The focus of treatment will be on food exploration in a comfortable and sensory supportive environment and will also include a parent education component. Many of our speech therapists and occupational therapists have specialty training in both the sensory and motor aspects of a feeding or swallowing problem. Treatment for feeding disorders can help a child become a functional eater. Treatment strategies include work on oral sensory awareness, motor execution and motor planning tasks, social modeling, structured meal and snack times, positive reinforcement and home programming. These services are designed to provide parents with the training they need to target their child’s eating strategies outside of the clinic and produce positive outcomes. 

EVALUATIONS: The evaluation would include an examination of the structures and movements in the mouth, observation of feeding behaviors, observations of the influences of respiration and posture, and informal assessment of nutrition. Food and drink trials are often included in an assessment. Review of medical history form and other records which are shared prior to first appointment. Standardized behavioral questionnaires are provided for parents and teaching/daycare staff to gain information on skills in the home/school settings and to identify any psychological symptoms which warrant specific treatment (e.g., anxiety). Consultative time is an essential portion of this specialty service and is an out of pocket expense.

• Intake 1-hour diagnostic interview with psychologist for parents only
• Testing Session: 1 ½ hour evaluation with both speech therapist and occupational therapist. This allows comprehensive observation of skills and represents a best-practice approach to evaluation services for feeding therapy.
• Interpretive Parent Conference (IPC): 1 hour appointment with parents and members of the diagnostic team during which parents are able to thoroughly understand their child’s development and feeding therapy plan. A written report includes findings, diagnostic impressions and recommendations.

Estimated evaluation cost: $2,381.00 (partially billable to insurance); may be billable to insurance ($1,205.00) and out-of-pocket only ($270.00). 

FEEDING CLINIC SERVICES: The clinic starts with a parent interview with a psychologist or counselor to review the child’s medical history and gather detailed information about the child’s feeding history, mealtime environment, and related behaviors. A behavioral questionnaire is provided to parents and teachers/childcare providers to gather information from both settings. The feeding clinic provides a 12 week structured curriculum to provide parents with all of the skills and knowledge they need to continue to produce positive outcomes after the clinic ends.

The clinic services are a 2-pronged approach that provides individualized intervention. Parents meet with psychologists and counselors without their children present to learn detailed strategies that work to change their child’s behaviors and approach to food (approximately 8 sessions). Parents and children also participate in several joint sessions to learn effective interventions to learn coping strategies and reduce anxiety (approximately 4 sessions).

Children work 1:1 with a feeding therapist using the (SOS) model with a focus on safe food exploration in a comfortable and sensory supportive environment. This evidence-based program includes a comprehensive parent education component, and parents are expected to participate on all feeding sessions in order to understand their child’s feeding behavior and effective management interventions.

A parent only summary session is provided at the end of the 12 week course with both feeding therapist and psychologist/counselor to review progress and provide a specific plan for next steps.

Both rehabilitation and psychological treatment is billable to insurance. Psychologists and counselors are in-network with Aetna and BCBS. Deductibles and copays apply. An out of pocket charge is included in the registration for services which covers consultative time for treatment team members to meet to discuss each case in detail.

Estimated clinic services cost: billable to insurance – 12 weekly therapy sessions for both psychology and rehab services and self-pay only - $ 336.00

Read more about the C&FD multidisciplinary feeding clinic here

Read More

Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Psychological Services

Cerebral Palsy: diagnosis and treatment at C&FD

Wednesday, Nov 8, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development occupational therapists, physical therapists and speech therapists evaluate and treat people with cerebral palsy.  

Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a physical disability that affects movement and posture and is considered a common childhood disability.  17 million people worldwide are impacted by CP.

CP is classified into 3 types:

  • spastic: most common type; muscles are stiff and tight
  • nonspastic/dyskinetic: characterized by involuntary movements
  • mixed: combination of types

CP can affect different parts of the body, especially limbs (arms, legs) but also the face, neck and torso. These conditions can be associated with CP and should be treated:

  • pain
  • intellectual disability
  • non-ambulant
  • hip displacement
  • non-verbal
  • feeding and swallowing difficulties
  • epilepsy
  • behavior challenges 
  • bladder incontinence
  • sleep difficulties
  • blindness
  • deafness

Our pediatric therapists offer a free phone consult to determine if an evaluation or intervention would be beneficial.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Schedule a free phone consultation with:  Physical Therapist Occupational Therapist Speech Therapist

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

5 tips for Halloween communication and fun!

Thursday, Oct 26, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Emily Gammon MS CCC-SLP is a pediatric speech therapist at Child and Family Development.  She is offering 5 TIPS on a monthly basis to expand communication opportunities for all! 

Many children with sensory processing, speech- language and/or motor difficulties can experience unique challenges when it comes to the holidays, Halloween included. Costumes can be itchy and uncomfortable, other children can be loud and unpredictable in their behaviors during trick-or-treating and related activities, daily routines can be altered with celebrations and talking with strangers can be rather uncomfortable. Here are some tips and tricks for a ghoul-tastic Halloween: 

1. Prepare your children for Halloween and related activities by watching kid-friendly movies. Some suggestions include: It’s a Big Pumpkin Charlie Brown, Casper and Hocus Pocus for the older kids! These movies might help them to better understand how this holiday pastime really works.

2. Practice trick-or-treating at home! You could incorporate different family members while practicing the sequence of events from knocking on the door/ringing the doorbell to receiving goodies into their buckets! (Our therapy offices also have practice "go-arounds" from 10/25-10/31)

3. Create a visual schedule to depict what will happen while trick-or-treating. This is really good for those kids who need an extra picture cue for what to expect around an unfamiliar event. It is really helpful to use language such as: first, then, next and last when building visual schedules.

4. Carefully select a costume that is conducive to your child’s speech, motor and sensory challenges. Remember that masks and other pieces that cover the face might make it difficult to navigate the streets while trick-or-treating at night, scratchy and itchy fabrics might exacerbate underlying sensory challenges and long or heavy fabrics might make mobility more difficult. Try on costumes in advance to address any issues with fit or comfort!

5. For those children who are non-verbal, consider carrying a card or pre-programming their AAC device to help them become an active participant in trick-or-treating! The message could read somewhat like this:  “Hello, my name is ___________. I am not yet able to say “trick-or-treat” or “Happy Halloween” but I am learning. Thanks for understanding and Happy Halloween!” If your child can manipulate their device with consistency, consider adding a few short messages on the home page that say “trick-or-treat”, “Happy Halloween” and “thank you”!

Happy Halloween!  

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services, Emily Gammon

Worried about autism? Wondering if your child is on track?

Wednesday, Oct 18, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Worried about autism? Wondering if your child is on track? 

Child and Family Development offers Multidisciplinary Developmental Evaluations for children ages 24 months-4 years

Our multidisciplinary infant-toddler diagnostic team offers these specialty evaluations at our Midtown Child and Family Development office. The diagnostic evaluation assesses domains for language and communication skills, early cognitive development, adaptive functioning, play skills and symptoms associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Fall 2017 expert diagnostic team:
Psychologist, Devon Redmond PhD
Speech-Language Therapist, Melinda Schatz MA CCC-SLP

Usual and customary tools:  
• Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, Second Edition (ADOS-2®)
• Autism Spectrum Rating Scales (ASRS™)
• Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition (Bayley-III®) 
• Preschool Language Scales, Fifth Edition (PLS-5™)
• Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Third Edition (Vineland-3™)

Estimated cost: $2,381.00 (partially billable to insurance)

Read more about multidisciplinary evaluations here.   

Read More

Topics: Melinda Schatz, Devon Redmond, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Psychological Services

Using the Sequential Oral Sensory™ (SOS) Approach for feeding difficulties

Wednesday, Oct 11, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Many Child and Family Development occupational therapists and speech therapists are trained in the Sequential Oral Sensory™ (SOS) Approach to Feeding.

SOS is a feeding approach for children who have trouble at mealtime.  This approach was founded by a child psychologist, Kay Tommey, PhD and a speech therapist, Erin Ross, PhD, CCC-SLP.  SOS may be beneficial in many settings and populations. Parents and caregivers of children who will not eat are faced with a difficult and often puzzling challenge. Because the interplay between weight gain and a child’s experience of food can be complicated, there is rarely an easy solution when a feeding problem arises. SOS uses a transdisciplinary team approach which assess the “whole child”: organ systems, muscles, sensory development, oral motor, learning and behavior, cognition, nutrition and environment.  SOS focuses on increasing a child’s comfort level by exploring and learning about the different properties of food and allows a child to interact with food in a playful, non-stressful way, beginning with the ability to tolerate the food in the room and in front of him/her; then moving on to touching, kissing and eventually tasting and eating foods.  Additional information is available on www.spdfoundation.net.

Recently, 4 C&FD therapists completed the "When Children Won't Eat: Picky Eaters vs. Problem Feeders Assessment and Treatment using the SOS Approach to Feeding" course in the Charlotte area.  

  • Rebecca Case MS OTR/L: I enjoyed the holistic strategies that include attention to behavior, cognition, core strength as well as feeding, that can be applied to many of her clients
  • Meghan Davidson-Palmer, MS OTR/L: The instructors were wonderful and provided a lot of practical tools I will use in occupational therapy regularly
  • Kristin Lyman, MA CCC-SLP: I appreciate this evidence-based program that will help my clients have more success when eating. I really liked that the course taught us how to help children develop oral motor and sensory processing skills at the same time through play.
  • Kim Toomer, MOT OTR/L: I gained so much knowledge in the areas of oral motor skills and feeding assessment and treatment. I used the techniques immediately after course and also learned new behavioral strategies that can be applied to all my clients, not just those with feeding difficulties.

If your child is a very picky eater or has a highly limited diet, consider scheduling a free phone Intake with one of the 9 SOS pediatric therapists here to determine if an evaluation is recommended.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Schedule a free phone consultation with:  Physical Therapist Occupational Therapist Speech Therapist

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, Kim Toomer, Kristin Lyman, Meghan Davidson-Palmer, Rebecca Case

Speech & Language Social Skills groups

Friday, Oct 6, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 

Kristin Lyman MA CCC-SLP is pleased to offer SPEECH & LANGUAGE SOCIAL SKILLS GROUPS at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development. Speech therapists work with kids and teens to improve social skills. When there are shared goals, groups can be formed to expand opportunities for practice and friendships.

Objectives Social skills groups are for children who struggle during interactions with others. Participants focus on practical conversational skills, such as:

  • Greetings
  • Turn-taking
  • Expressing yourself
  • Initiating and maintaining conversations
  • Social awareness
  • Emotions
  • Reading nonverbal language from others
  • Problem solving difficult situations

In the group setting, speech therapists facilitate the interactions to help children understand how to navigate various social situations. Sessions involve a variety of activities including lessons, turn-taking games, social stories, and role-playing for application of skills.  Groups are typically formed by age, but communication skills are considered too:

  • 6 years old and under
  • 7-14 years old
  • 15+ years old

Here's what some parents say about these groups:

  • “<My child> has achieved a refreshing confidence and a fearless daring spirit in his language skills.”
  • “<Our teen> has not only increased his speech abilities substantially, he has made a great friend!”

Scheduling These groups are ongoing, so new clients may join in at anytime. Typically, up to 4 participants are in a group.   

Cost Families may use available insurance benefits. Regular deductibles and co-pays apply. Prior Authorization, medical necessity approval and evaluations are required, as applicable by funding source. Families may also pay privately. Group services are $54/ session.      

Contact

Kristin Lyman, MA CCC-SLP, Speech-Language Pathologist, 704.541.9080 ext. 213

Click here to view and print the information page.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

Read More

Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services, Kristin Lyman

Don't Take Our Word For It! Takes one to know one!!

Thursday, Oct 5, 2017 by Child & Family Development

When services began for one family, the speech therapist knew she was talking to an informed parent.  Turns out the child's mother works with kids too! Recently she shared:  

"Kristin Lyman is amazing and <my son> loves her.  I really appreciate her energy to my kiddo.  You can tell she's devoted to her kids and this field.  We feel so lucky to work with her!"  

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Testimonials, Kristin Lyman

5 tips for talking with a teacher about a child's communication difficulties

Thursday, Sep 21, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Emily Gammon MS CCC-SLP is a pediatric speech therapist at Child and Family Development.  She is offering 5 TIPS on a monthly basis to expand communication opportunities for all! 

Often times, parents can become uneasy at the beginning of the school year hoping that they and their child(ren) will get along with their new teacher(s). This can be especially difficult if the child has speech and/or language difficulties. Try these tips:  

1. Foster an open line of communication early on in the school year. It is okay to ask for emails and updates about how your child is doing during school and activities and skills that your child is working on.
2. Inform the teacher(s) about the community services your child receives as well as the therapy goals. If the teachers the child’s strengths and weaknesses, ways to help him express himself and understand others via appropriate compensatory strategies, they will be able to support your child in the classroom successfully. 
3. Foster an open line of communication between school staff and therapist(s). It can be helpful for the professionals working with your child to communicate about therapeutic activities, school activities, mastered skills and ways to overlap and reinforce one another's strategies. An Authorization For Release Of Information form is required for this communication. 
4. Schedule regular meetings with teacher(s). Share details about your child's functional skills, ways the teacher can support the child and what you will do at home to facilitate school success. 
5. Discuss ideas for community involvement and extracurricular activities with your child’s teacher. They may have great suggestions related to academics and grade-level expectations. 

Our team of speech therapists can help your child be successful in school and other settings.  

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services, Emily Gammon

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Child & Family Development is a multi-disciplinary pediatric clinic serving the needs of Charlotte area children and their families.

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Contact

  • MIDTOWN OFFICE
  • 4012 Park Road, Suite 200
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.332.4834
  • PINEVILLE OFFICE
  • 10516 Park Road
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.541.9080

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The information contained in this website is intended to provide general educational information and client education on certain topics only and is not intended to offer healthcare/medical advice. This information should not be considered complete and should not be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice from a licensed healthcare professional. Child and Family Development is not liable or responsible for any advice, course of treatment, diagnosis or any other information or services you obtain through this website. If you have, or suspect you have, a health problem you should never disregard medical advice or delay seeking medical attention because of something you have read on this website. Never rely on information on this website in place of seeking professional medical advice. If you have questions about a medical condition or seek advice, see your healthcare professional immediately.

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Links from our website to other websites are provided as a service to help users find appropriate information. Absolutely no responsibility is taken by Child and Family Development or its employees for the accuracy of the information you may receive from any of the referred links. If you have questions about a medical condition or seek medical advice, contact your healthcare professional.