Seating Supports for Students: Considering Alternatives for Seating in the Classroom or Home

Monday, Apr 9, 2018 by Child & Family Development

Appropriate seating may not be the first thing a parent or teacher would think of as the child begins an assignment; however, having different options can potentially boost their performance. Children with or without learning differences may benefit from a variety of seating accommodations.

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services

Effective Strategies for Integrating Sensory and Motor Learning.

Tuesday, Feb 20, 2018 by Child & Family Development

Congratulations to Katie Kennedy, DPT and Kati Berlin, MS OTR/L, who recently completed a course on practical and effective strategies for integrating sensory and motor learning. Through this professional development course, these clinicians focused on strengthening their skills in the following areas.

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Kati Berlin, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Physical Therapy helps PAIN that doesn't go away in kids and teens

Friday, Dec 29, 2017 by Child & Family Development

PAIN IN CHILDREN AND TEENS

Pain in children and teens is complex and may be difficult to diagnose. In kids, the nervous and musculoskeletal systems are still developing. A child’s perception of pain is different from an adult. Children may be unable to differentiate or describe types of pain (I.e. sharp, dull and intense). Some types of pain are straightforward (i.e. post-injury) and other types require more analysis and research (i.e. pain from migraines, pain following a virus, pain after surgery, fibromyalgia, chronic pain and Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). 

Pain in children and teens is broadly referred to as Amplified Musculoskeletal Pain (AMP). Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is another name for AMP. AMP can impact physical activity, mood, school performance, sleep and many other areas. It is chronic pain.

WHAT IS CHRONIC PAIN?

The simple description is pain that lasts longer than 3 months and interferes with a person’s ability to participate in activities of daily living.  

WHAT IS CRPS/AMP?  

Either is a condition of severe localized pain. It is difficult to diagnose and is usually diagnosed by ruling out other possible conditions or diseases. Its prevalence is probably under identified in children and adolescents. It occurs in girls more often than boys. It involves the lower extremities more often than upper extremities. It can move from one extremity to another.

INDICATORS OF AMP/CRPS:

  • A known cause or event that starts the pain cycle, but not always in children
  • Severe pain with light touch or skin, pain response which is disproportionate to injury or continuous pain
  • Changes to the area affected such as swelling, blood flow, hair growth or skin color
  • No other clear cause of pain or inability to move
  • No obvious nerve damage 

EVIDENCE BASED TREATMENT

Elusive pain disorders can be very upsetting for families. Traditional medical care may fail when there is no designated reason for the pain, customary techniques are not beneficial or medications cannot or should not be sustained over a period of time.

A multidisciplinary approach is often recommended, including:

  • physical therapy
  • occupational therapy
  • psychological intervention
  • Physician-prescribed mild medications

Treatment strategies include:

  • child and caregiver education
  • relearning normal use of the affected body part
  • desensitization
  • strengthening of the affected body part
  • coping skills to manage emotional components such as relaxation and mindfulness
  • mobilizing community resources

Outcomes include:

  • restoration of function
  • pain relief
  • reduced school absenteeism
  • social inclusion, not isolation
  • improved self awareness

HAVE A CONCERN?

Child and Family Development physical therapists, occupational therapists and psychologists can help your child get back to his/her healthy, happy self. You will be amazed at the ability to retrain the brain and body!  Click below to learn more about each of these services:

Click here for a printable page about pain. 

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Gail Fennimore, Katie Eggleston, Blake Templeton

Clumsy or Dyspraxia? Read more from C&FD physical therapists

Monday, Dec 18, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 

Many moms and dads who contact Child & Family Development report that their child is “a little clumsy”.  In many instances, it can be difficult to recognize if this is simply part of development and adjusting to a growing body or an area to be explored more specifically. The explanation may be developmental dyspraxia.

 

The physical therapy team provides this explanation. 

 

Developmental dyspraxia is a motor learning difficulty that can affect planning of movements and coordination as a result of brain messages not being accurately transmitted to the body. 

 

Do you describe a child in these ways?

·         Bumping into things all the time, or accident-prone

·         Inability or difficulty with skipping, jumping rope or climbing

·         Strong but not very coordinated

·         Falling out of chairs, knocking things over or messy

·         Awkward or difficulty walking or running

·         Difficulty playing, participating, or insecurities with sports or games

 

Children with dyspraxia have particular problems learning new motor skills and activities and coordinating the upper and lower limbs of the body. To efficiently move through the environment and learn new skills, the body relies on sensory systems- tactile (touch), vestibular (movement) and proprioceptive (how muscles perceive actions). If these systems are not properly integrated, a child appears clumsy.

 

Some characteristics of developmental dyspraxia are:

·         Awkward gait movement

·         Decreased sense of body awareness

·         Emotional lability, sensitivity or appears distracted

·         Difficulty judging distances

·         Difficulty imitating body positions 

·         Poor balance

·         Poor sequencing of activities

·         Poor short and/or long term memory

·         Slow movement planning and reaction times in both fine motor gross motor 

 

Even if only a few of these characteristics are noted in a child, an evaluation could be the first step to address the issue. While there is no cure for dyspraxia, a trained pediatric occupational therapist or physical therapist can assist the child in learning ways to improve their motor planning abilities and becoming more successful with gross motor learning and performance.

 

Current data notes that 6% of all children ages 5-11 have a developmental coordination disorder. It is important to note that motor difficulties are likely to coexist with several other diagnoses, including:

·         Auditory Processing Disorder

·         Executive Function Disorder

·         Hypotonia

·         Low Birth Weight

·         Sensory Processing Disorder

 

There are treatment options for developmental dyspraxia.  There are several types of praxis (movement) that may be addressed in therapy. These types include: oral, sequential, postural, constructional, and praxis on verbal command. 

 

Research shows that a combination of strength and coordination goals, as well as work on specific functional skills (climbing stairs, skipping) is most effective. A therapist can, through play and exploration of new motor activities, address the affected area(s) of praxis and improve overall motor planning and abilities. 

 

Advanced training and techniques are used in treatment of developmental dyspraxia:

·         E-Stimulation (E-Stim) 

·         Neuro-Developmental Treatment (NDT)™

·         Sensory Integration

·         Total Motion Release (TMR)®

 

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Gail Fennimore, Katie Eggleston, Blake Templeton

Crawling: Good for the Body and the Brain

Thursday, Dec 14, 2017 by Child & Family Development

A child’s first steps bring a lot of excitement.  It is a huge developmental accomplishment and certainly should be celebrated.  Often times, parents see walking as the first big milestone, The physical therapists and occupational therapists at Child and Family Development know that there are many important motor skills that infants should learn and do long before they walk.

One of these important pre-walking milestones is independent crawling.  Sometimes, when babies skip crawling, it seems as if they are “advanced.”  The truth is that crawling first is strongly preferred since it provides important input to the entire body with long-lasting benefits. Here are some of the main reasons why it is important to encourage and allow a child to crawl:

Crawling works on coordinating the two sides of the body:

  • When a baby crawls, it is the first time they are required to coordinate the two sides of their body to move in a different way.  Crawling activates both hemispheres of the brain in a balanced and reciprocal way.
  • The first time that a baby is able to independently move in a forward direction is during crawling.  The eyes must scan the environment and in order to do so, the baby must look across the mid line of their body.  This helps to develop eye-hand coordination. 

Crawling helps to develop trunk and extremity strength and flexibility:

  • One of the requirements of crawling is for a baby to be able to hold their body off of the ground against gravity for an extended period of time.  This requires a lot of core strength!  Crawling is definitely a full body strengthener- it helps to build the muscles of the neck, the stomach, the back, the arms, and the legs.

Crawling provides the ability to see the environment in a different way:

  • Crawling enables exploration and manipulation of the environment.  The eyes are required to look in all directions to scan the environment.  All of this exploration and discovery leads to brain development, and can help to improve cognition.

Crawling works on the development of the arches in the hands and strengthens the wrists and shoulders:

  • When babies crawl, it is the only time they are naturally bearing the weight of their body through their arms.  This is important for developing strength in the shoulders, wrists, and hands.  As a child gets older, they will need hand strength in order to use utensils and to hold a pencil to write.  One of the first questions our occupational therapists ask when a child comes in for an evaluation due to poor handwriting is “did the child ever crawl?”  Lots of times poor handwriting can be due to weakness in the hands and wrists, and crawling helps to strengthen all of these muscles in preparation for the development of fine motor skills.

Crawling can help to integrate sensory information that is coming into the body:

  • Crawling provides lots of tactile (touch) stimulation through both the hands and the feet.  This kind of stimulation helps improve body awareness, or the ability to recognize where the parts of your body are in space without having to look at them. As babies continue to grow, it becomes more and more important to be able to move the parts of the body without having to look to see where they are.  Being able to experience different sensations coming into the brain from the arms and legs helps the child to integrate sensory information.

Although crawling is not the only skill that helps to develop all of these areas, it is unique because it provides the many benefits all at once.  Encourage crawling and  enjoy it while it lasts.  You can feel confident in the fact that it is good for not only the body, but also for the brain!

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services

Sensory Storytime

Wednesday, Dec 13, 2017 by Child & Family Development

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services

Making Sense of Sensory Processing

Wednesday, Nov 29, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 

Ever know a child who seems to fall, trip and bump into things more than peers?  Many skills must be in place to support good balance and proprioception. Adequate sensory processing skills, range of motion, and strength are foundational skills required for balance and knowing where you are in space.

SENSORY PROCESSING & PROPRIOCEPTION

The Vestibular System:

  • Tells us where our heads and bodies are in relation to the surface of the earth
  • Tells us whether we are moving or standing still and whether objects are moving or motionless in relation to our body
  • Tells us about the direction in which we are moving and how fast we are moving
  • Lays a foundation for visual input
  • Without good information coming from the vestibular system, sights and sounds in the environment don’t make sense.

The Visual System:

  • Our eyes should work together in a teamed fashion with smooth movements to scan our environment and notice how close or far things are from our body to help us maneuver through space.

The Proprioceptive System:

  • Proprioceptive input receptors are in the muscles and joints and give information to the brain about the amount of stretch in each muscle and pressure on each joint.
  • This provides an accurate picture of the body’s position in space without the use of vision.  
  • Proprioception provides feedback for grading muscle movements and for how much force is needed to interact with an object or person in the environment.

BALANCE

Balance Expectations by age:

  • 3 year old - balance on 1 foot for 3 seconds
  • 3 year old – use alternating feet when climbing stairs
  • 4 year old - hop on 1 foot
  • 5 year old - balance on 1 foot for 10 seconds

Red Flags for Balance Difficulties

  • Child trips/falls/bumps into things often
  • Child who is fearful of movement
  • Child who seeks out movement
  • Child who appears to have good balance while moving, but poor balance when expected to stay still
  • Child who has difficulty moving through dynamic environments
  • Child who has difficulty walking across different or dynamic surfaces
  •  

HOW DO THESE SYSTEMS WORK TOGETHER?

  • Information from these body systems is processed and combined in order for a person to adapt and react to a changing environment.

HAVE A CONCERN?

Contact an occupational therapist at Child and Family Development for a standardized assessment of motor and sensory skills. Treatment modalities may include:

  • Sensory Integration
  • Core/Postural Strengthening
  • Postural Control and Stability Training
  • Balance Strategies Training
  • Visual-Motor Exercises
  • Oculomotor Training
  • Therapeutic Listening ®

Click here to read more about our occupational therapy services.

Click here for a printable page about sensory processing.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Psychological Services

C&FD therapists use Total Motion Release (TMR)

Wednesday, Nov 22, 2017 by Child & Family Development

3 members of our pediatric therapy team are trained in Total Motion Release® (TMR).

  • Marion Wilm, OTR/L, occupational therapist
  • Jessica Turchin MPT ATRIC, physical therapist
  • Erin Krueger DPT ATRIC, physical therapist

Per the TMR website, this approach brings the body back into balance in a slightly different way than what is traditionally thought of for therapy.  TMR identifies fascial restrictions within the body.  Often times range of motion restrictions are not strictly due to muscular tightness.  By addressing the fascial restrictions, new range of motion may be freed, allowing for improved alignment for increased functional abilities.

To learn more about this approach, call us to schedule a free Intake appointment with one of these therapists.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Schedule a free phone consultation with:  Physical Therapist Occupational Therapist Speech Therapist

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Topics: Jessica Turchin, Marion Wilm, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Pelvic Floor Dysfunction & Physical Therapy with Gail Fennimore

Friday, Nov 17, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Gail Fennimore, PT PCS is one of the most experienced and tenured physical therapists at Child and Family Development.  In addition to her pediatric clinical specialist (PCS) certification, Gail has specialized training in pelvic floor dysfunction training and offers evaluation and treatment for related conditions.      

There are specific treatment protocols for children with urinary and fecal incontinence with conditions including:

  • Daytime wetting
  • Urinary frequency
  • Withholding urine
  • Constipation
  • Nighttime wetting
  • Urinary urgency
  • Incomplete emptying
  • Fecal incontinence

Gail collaborates with physicians to offer a unique family centered approach to intervention that includes:

  • comprehensive evaluations
  • 1-hour individual appointments on a regular or consultative basis
  • play-based exercise programming
  • toileting sessions
  • customized patient and caregiver training
  • available consultations at the physician offices

In addition, other members of our multidisciplinary clinical team, including psychologists and occupational therapists, may be available for case coordination and patient care.

Specialists, such as urologists and gastroenterlogists, as well as pediatricians, might recommend an evaluation and treatment.  Also, families can to call our office to get started.    

For more information about the benefit of physical therapy for pelvic floor dysfunction, contact:

Gail Fennimore PT PCS C/NDT, gfennimore@childandfamilydevelopment.com, 704-372-9652 ext. 112. 

Read more about Gail's expertise here 

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Gail Fennimore

Cerebral Palsy: diagnosis and treatment at C&FD

Wednesday, Nov 8, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development occupational therapists, physical therapists and speech therapists evaluate and treat people with cerebral palsy.  

Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a physical disability that affects movement and posture and is considered a common childhood disability.  17 million people worldwide are impacted by CP.

CP is classified into 3 types:

  • spastic: most common type; muscles are stiff and tight
  • nonspastic/dyskinetic: characterized by involuntary movements
  • mixed: combination of types

CP can affect different parts of the body, especially limbs (arms, legs) but also the face, neck and torso. These conditions can be associated with CP and should be treated:

  • pain
  • intellectual disability
  • non-ambulant
  • hip displacement
  • non-verbal
  • feeding and swallowing difficulties
  • epilepsy
  • behavior challenges 
  • bladder incontinence
  • sleep difficulties
  • blindness
  • deafness

Our pediatric therapists offer a free phone consult to determine if an evaluation or intervention would be beneficial.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Schedule a free phone consultation with:  Physical Therapist Occupational Therapist Speech Therapist

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Fall Exercise: Physical Therapy Around The House with Katie Eggleston Kennedy DPT

Monday, Oct 30, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston Kennedy DPT, physical therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, emphasizes that we can improve our health and build motor skills not just in a physical therapy session or gym, but in everyday events and activities already happening around the house.

In October, Katie has ideas about autumn exercise options 

The cooler weather is a relief from the sweltering summer temperatures, meaning you can stay outside longer and play without overheating! try these activities in the backyard, park or neighborhood: 

• Tag games- freeze tag, tunnel tag (if you’re tagged, you stand with legs apart and another teammate has to crawl under you to “unfreeze” you!), snake tag (everyone tagged has to join hands and becomes “it” as well!), or Marco Polo on land will all help with overall strength and endurance

• Touch or flag football pick-up games for hand eye coordination, endurance, and agility

• Bike or scooter rides to work on balance and coordination

BONUS: Sneak in gross motor exercise and sensory input by way of fall chores: raking leaves, dragging bagged leaves to the curbside, planting a fall garden, or for the older ones…helping to mow the lawn and move wheelbarrows around when cleaning the yard

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Give aquatic physical therapy a try this fall!

Friday, Oct 20, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development offers pool-based physical therapy at the Harris YMCA!

The fall 2017 schedule block ends in late November and just a few trial spots remain open.  Families can attend one session to determine if a permanent session in the future would be beneficial and feasible. 

We have offered aquatic therapy for about 15 years and two physical therapists are in the water regularly this fall:

Erin Krueger, DPT, ATRIC
 Jessica Turchin, LPT, ATRIC

Sessions in the pool are offered in seasonal blocks or on a 1-time occasional basis to try it out as an adjunct to regular land based therapies. 

Pool therapy is a great complement to a physical therapy or occupational therapy intervention. 

  • The aquatic medium provides a number of unique properties that are almost impossible to replicate on land. 
  • The hydrostatic pressure of the water really helps our pediatric patients with body awareness and sensory integration.  Not to mention the undeniable aid with postural support for not only standing, but also for breathing! 
  • The buoyancy aids in off weighting the body to make coordination of activities much easier, as it can be used to lessen the strength required to perform a movement successfully.  Many people learn to walk first in the water and then on land. 
  • The confidence they have in the water is remarkable.  Imagine seeing a 7 year old motor plan and successfully walk for the first time in the water - now that 10 year old is walking independently on land! 

For the last 7 years, we have partnered with th Harris YMCA in Charlotte near South Park Mall.   The indoor pool has several features that are especially therapeutic including:

  • zero tide entrance, like walking into the ocean
  • whirlpool, with variable resistance and pressure 
  • heated water
  • floating equipment and toys

Click here to read more about the benefits of aquatic therapy.  

Click here to review the pool waiver and consent form. 

Read More

Topics: Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger

C&FD PTs are celebrating National Physical Therapy Month!

Monday, Oct 2, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Our team of 6 physical therapists is celebrating National Physical Therapy Month 2017 with the American Physical Therapy Association!

MIDTOWN OFFICE (Charlotte) PINEVILLE OFFICE

Gail Fennimore PT PCS

Amy Sturkey LPT 

Blake Templeton DPT

Katie Eggleston Kennedy DPT

Erin Krueger DPT ATRIC

Jessica Turchin MPT ATRIC

We provide services to children, teens and young adults with developmental, neurological and congenital impairments.  Services can be habilitative (learning a skill for the first time) or rehabilitative (becoming more proficient at a skill or relearning a skill).  We focus on improving and adapting a child's gross motor abilities.  

If you notice difficulties in one or more of these areas, an evaluation and treatment may be appropriate:

  • Balance
  • Coordination
  • Endurance
  • Flexibility
  • Gait
  • Gross Motor Skill Acquisition
  • Motor Planning
  • Muscle Strength
  • Postural Alignment 
  • Range Of Motion
  • Strength in trunk and legs
  • Surgical Rehabilitation 

All of our therapists are licensed by the state of North Carolina. 

Child and Family Development physical therapists are in-network with many insurance plans, including Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC, Cigna, Medcost, North Carolina Medicaid, Primary Physician Care, South Carolina Medicaid and United Health Care.  Our clients also may pay privately and access out-of-network benefits.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Gail Fennimore, Katie Eggleston, Blake Templeton

Apple Picking: Physical Therapy Around The House with Katie Eggleston Kennedy DPT

Friday, Sep 29, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston Kennedy DPT, physical therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, emphasizes that we can improve our health and build motor skills not just in a physical therapy session or gym, but in everyday events and activities already happening around the house.

In September, Katie has ideas about apple picking 

Here are some tips to transform this fun fall activity into an opportunity to sneak in exercise and motor skill building:

  • If there is the option to walk rather than drive in, choose it! You’ll get some strengthening, balance challenges walking over the uneven ground, and endurance.
  • Reaching on tiptoes for those hard to reach apples…you always find the best ones up high!
  • Keep bag/basket on ground to promote squatting to put apples in after picking to work those legs. Wouldn’t want to drop in the apples and bruise them!
  • Carrying their own bag/basket of apples for some upper body strengthening.

 Happy Autumn! 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Fall 2017 Aquatic Therapy at the Harris YMCA

Monday, Sep 18, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development continues pool-based physical therapy at the Harris YMCA!

We have offered aquatic therapy for about 15 years and four physical therapists will be in the water regularly this fall:

Erin Krueger, DPT, ATRIC
 Jessica Turchin, LPT, ATRIC

Sessions in the pool are offered in seasonal blocks or on a 1-time occasional basis to try it out as an adjunct to regular land based therapies. 

Pool therapy is a great complement to a physical therapy or occupational therapy intervention. 

  • The aquatic medium provides a number of unique properties that are almost impossible to replicate on land. 
  • The hydrostatic pressure of the water really helps our pediatric patients with body awareness and sensory integration.  Not to mention the undeniable aid with postural support for not only standing, but also for breathing! 
  • The buoyancy aids in off weighting the body to make coordination of activities much easier, as it can be used to lessen the strength required to perform a movement successfully.  Many people learn to walk first in the water and then on land. 
  • The confidence they have in the water is remarkable.  Imagine seeing a 7 year old motor plan and successfully walk for the first time in the water - now that 10 year old is walking independently on land! 

For the last 7 years, we have partnered with th Harris YMCA in Charlotte near South Park Mall.   The indoor pool has several features that are especially therapeutic including:

  • zero tide entrance, like walking into the ocean
  • whirlpool, with variable resistance and pressure 
  • heated water
  • floating equipment and toys

Click here to read more about the benefits of aquatic therapy.  

Click here to review the pool waiver and consent form. 

Read More

Topics: Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger

Jessica Turchin MPT celebrates 7 years at Child and Family Development

Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 by Child & Family Development


Jessica Turchin MPT ATRIC marks 7 years at Child and Family Development this month! She is a physical therapist at the Pineville office.    

She shares:

"I have really enjoyed expanding the aquatic therapy pool program to 4 physical therapists this summer.  The C&FD team and the kids have had a lot of fun with the big group and developed new games and ideas off of each other.  As the mom of a baby myself now, I have a new appreciation for the amount of trust parents put into letting us work with their children and a new understanding of the level of worry they might have too.  It is an important part of my job to provide whatever comfort and easing of their mind I can, so we can get to work helping their little one!

Happy Anniversary Jessica! 

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Topics: Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services

Back(pack) to School: tips from a physical therapist 

Friday, Aug 25, 2017 by Child & Family Development

As the sun sets on summer and the school bells ring once again, Blake Templeton DPT recommends taking time to evaluate your child’s backpack in order to maintain skeletal and muscular health.

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Blake Templeton

Don't Take Our Word For It! Grown up girl remembers physical therapy at C&FD

Tuesday, Aug 22, 2017 by Child & Family Development

When Child and Family Development was founded back in 1980, no one was thinking about social media, friends, follows or instant messaging.  Still, it is so fun to hear from people who were clients in those days.  Recently, we received a Facebook message from a woman who shared:

"I was once a client at C&FD. Amy Sturkey was an amazing physical therapist. I loved Vicki Christensen too. Thanks for being a big part of my childhood!"

Read more "About Us" and our history here.              

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Testimonials

Physical Therapy: Backpacks- Around The House with Katie Eggleston DPT

Friday, Aug 18, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston DPT, physical therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, emphasizes that we can improve our health and build motor skills not just in a physical therapy session or gym, but in everyday events and activities already happening around the house.

In August, Katie has ideas about backpacks!  

According to the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), “improper backpack use can cause injury, especially to children with young, growing muscles and joints.”

Good features to look for in a backpack include:

  • Padded straps (TWO!)
  • Padded back
  • Waist belt 

Backpack fit and safety tips:

  • Backpack should sit snugly in the middle of the back, not be sagging down to waist
  • Both straps should be used, on each shoulder. Using just one strap can cause muscle imbalance and injury
  • Waist strap should be fastened to distribute weight of pack evenly through back and pelvis
  • Keep heaviest books closest to the rear of the pack (closest to child’s back)
  • A backpack should weigh only 10-15% of your child's weight

Happy Back To School! 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Amy Sturkey, celebrates 29 years at Child and Family Development

Thursday, Aug 3, 2017 by Child & Family Development


Amy Sturkey LPT C/NDT marks 29 years at Child and Family Development this month! She is a physical therapist at the Midtown office.    

We are so very proud of her clinical work here, as well as outside of the office.  Her work outside of C&FD includes an exercise and therapeutic activity app for kids and a children's book about autism and an upcoming book about Down syndrome:

A Is For Autism
iTunes pediatric physical therapy app
iTunes pediatric physical therapy strengthening exercises for back
• iT
unes pediatric physical therapy knee extension

Follow her Pediatric Physical Therapy Exercises page on Facebook and Twitter too!

In the office, Amy has started a new trend in her care- telling jokes to her clients and co-workers! 

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, C&FD Physical Therapy Services

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Child & Family Development is a multi-disciplinary pediatric clinic serving the needs of Charlotte area children and their families.

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Contact

  • MIDTOWN OFFICE
  • 4012 Park Road, Suite 200
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.332.4834
  • PINEVILLE OFFICE
  • 10516 Park Road
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.541.9080

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