Physical Therapy: Taking Care of Animals Around-The-House with Katie Eggleston DPT

Monday, Feb 20, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston DPT, physical therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, emphasizes that we can improve our health and build motor skills not just in a physical therapy session or gym, but in everyday events and activities already happening around the house. In February, Katie suggests getting kids involved in taking care of pets…supervised of course!

  • As the weather warms up, walking the dog is a great way to sneak in some exercise working on leg strength and cardio-respiratory endurance.
  • Stand on tiptoes or climb a small step stool to feed animals in cages or tanks to build leg strength and balance.
  • For kids of an appropriate age, work on leg strength with squatting  to help scoop cat litter or fill food dishes.
  • Playing catch/fetch outdoors with the family dog: parent throws ball to child to catch who then throws for the dog to chase. This can greatly improve hand eye coordination as well as bilateral coordination for throwing with alternate arm/leg.

As an added bonus, kids will learn about care-taking and responsibility, the bond with animals will deepen, and the parent gets a little chore relief!

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Don't Take Our Word For It! Physical therapy and more.

Friday, Feb 17, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Gail Fennimore PT PCS C/NDT works at Child and Family Development- Midtown and knows that sometimes the job includes more than physical therapy expertise. 

A recent client survey included this comment: "Gail has been wonderful to work with our insurance company.  She has gone above and beyond with trying to get coverage for our son!”

Read more about our physical therapists here.          

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Gail Fennimore, C&FD Testimonials

Physical Therapy safety checklist: navigating streets and parking lots

Monday, Feb 6, 2017 by Child & Family Development

The Child and Family Development physical therapy team helps kids and teens learn safe navigation in their community.

This can include stairs, exits/entrances, outdoor terrain and even street cross-sections.

Physical therapists sometimes use this safety checklist to assess skill level and identify hazards.

 

Does this child do the following?:

  • Choose an appropriate route or accessible access as needed including beginning and end location to cross the road/parking lot

  • Stop appropriately on a sidewalk, the edge of a road, edge of parked cars to view traffic

  • Acknowledge and obey cross walk indicators when present

  • Looks left and right before proceeding

  • Listen or answer appropriate questions regarding sound   (i.e . notices sounds of nearby engines, backing sounds, etc)

  • Notice visual indications of cars backing up as appropriate (such as reverse lights)

  • Hold an adult's hand if decision making skills are under an age equivalency of 10 years OR walk beside others if older than 10 years in decision making

  • Choose an appropriate initial pace crossing

  • Modify pace appropriately when crossing as determined by oncoming cars

  • Continue to look left and right while crossing

  • Understand Walk and Don’t Walk Symbols at crosswalks

  • Know and press appropriate button (when available) to trigger Walk Symbol at crosswalk 

  • Continue to monitor crosswalk indicator for changes

  • Walks when the symbol changes to Walk

Read more about physical therapy services here.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services

How to Get the Most Out Of Therapy- Insurance and Financial Management

Friday, Feb 3, 2017 by Child & Family Development

This is the third of three HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OUT OF THERAPY AT CHILD AND FAMILY DEVELOPMENT posts. This post is about: Insurance and Financial Management

Getting started or managing a change:

  • Understand insurance benefits via discussions with us and your funding source.
  • Understand all insurance and other health care options that your employer may be offer and compare what is available. Compare plans when possible.      
  • Anticipate your out-of-pocket costs for the year. We can help project these figures.
  • Determine what tax preferred ways there are to fund out-of-pocket costs.
  • Obtain physician prescriptions to support therapy.
  • Communicate with C&FD Client Services Team:
    • Notify us anytime there is a change in insurance benefit or plan.
    • Notify us anytime there is a change in guarantor or policy holder.
    • Notify us anytime there is a change in primary doctors or specialists.
    • Coordinate insurance benefits for multiple services, as some plans have daily limitations.
    • Plan ahead for annual visit maximums.

At each visit:

  • Check in with the client services team prior to each visit.
    • Checking in notifies the therapist that you have arrived.
    • Checking in ensures that you stay current with insurance coverage of services and can apply your co-pay or coinsurance to your visit.
  • We use American Medical Association (AMA) diagnosis and treatment codes that all insurance companies and professionals can reference.
    • A therapist selects applicable procedure codes based on what happens during each session. Some sessions may include equipment checks, caregiver training, re-evaluation of progress to goals, or other services such as splinting or taping. Therefore, out-of-pocket costs may vary from one session to another.

For the full document, click here.

GET STARTED NOW

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services

Physical therapist, Gail Fennimore, celebrates 23 years at C&FD

Tuesday, Jan 31, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Gail Fennimore!

Gail Fennimore PT PCS C/NDT is a physical therapist at Child and Family Development- Midtown.  This month, she celebrates 23 years!  

She shares this tidbit:

"I chose to become a PT after a high school injury.  I received physical therapy and was excited by the field even then.  After all of the time, the key to staying motivated is to be curious!"

Great advice from a great therapist!

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Gail Fennimore

Physical Therapy: Climbing Stairs Around-The-House with Katie Eggleston DPT

Monday, Jan 30, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston DPT, physical therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, emphasizes that we can improve our health and build motor skills not just in a physical therapy session or gym, but in everyday events and activities already happening around the house. In January, she shares:

Here is a general timeline for mastering stair climbing:

  • Crawling up stairs by 9-12 months
  • Walking up steps placing two feet on each step while holding a rail or parents hand by 18 months
  • Independently walking up stairs with two feet on each step by 24-30 months
  • Walking up or down steps placing one foot on each step while holding a rail by 2 years, 7 months- 3 years
  • Independently walking up or down stairs with one foot on each step by 3 years 

Katie shares that children often go up first- ascent comes before descent!  Parents may see scooting, crawling or sliding down stairs even if they can walk up. Children with access to stairs in their homes were more likely to learn to ascend stairs at a younger age, but all children are equally likely to descend at the same age, regardless of access to the stairs.

Parent/ caregiver involvement is key for safety and encouragement.  To help a child master stair climbing:

  • An adult must always be present for safety.  
  • Baby gates should be installed at the top and bottom of staircases until independent mastery has occurred. Cover any openings (banisters e.g.) to prevent accidents or escapes.
  • Encourage gross motor development of climbing by letting infants crawl over couch cushions on the floor, benches, crates or even parent's legs.
  • When intiitally practicing on stairs, hold both of the child's hands. Progress gradually to one hand hold and one hand on rail, then one hand on rail and one on wall.
  • Start with just a few steps up and down, rather than tackling the whole staircase at once.  This can be intimidating and scary for kids.
  • If a child is unwilling to climb with one hand on the rail and one hand free, giving them a toy to hold in the free hand.  The toy can be motivating and distracting.  
  • Use visual targets on the steps! Print out pictures of feet or put stickers on the steps to indicate the path.  
  • Encourage strengthening of both sides equally. Typically, a child will lead up stairs with their stronger leg and lead down stairs with their weaker leg. Practice with both feet.

Katie recommends a National Institute of Health article titled “How and when infants learn to climb stairs” here.  

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

 

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

How to Get the Most Out Of Therapy- Home Programs and Follow-Through

Friday, Jan 27, 2017 by Child & Family Development

This is the second of three HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OUT OF THERAPY AT CHILD AND FAMILY DEVELOPMENT posts. This post is about: Home Programs and Follow-Through

A therapist will share information and recommendations regularly.  

  • Review the evaluation results, treatment goals and progress reports. Ask questions!
  • Talk with the therapist at each session. Observe some or all of the treatment sessions.
  • Follow the home program. Often, you can incorporate the therapeutic activities into what you are already doing.
  • Follow therapist recommendations for other services and complete these appointments promptly.
  • Allow professionals to share information with one another by completing an Authorization for Release of Information with a member of our client services team.
  • Your therapist may suggest a variety of treatment techniques and schedule changes over the course of treatment. Have a regular and open dialogue about these suggestions.

For the full document, click here.

GET STARTED NOW

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services

Making Sense of Sensory Processing

Tuesday, Jan 24, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 

Ever know a child who seems to fall, trip and bump into things more than peers?  Many skills must be in place to support good balance and proprioception. Adequate sensory processing skills, range of motion, and strength are foundational skills required for balance and knowing where you are in space.

SENSORY PROCESSING & PROPRIOCEPTION

The Vestibular System:

  • Tells us where our heads and bodies are in relation to the surface of the earth
  • Tells us whether we are moving or standing still and whether objects are moving or motionless in relation to our body
  • Tells us about the direction in which we are moving and how fast we are moving
  • Lays a foundation for visual input
  • Without good information coming from the vestibular system, sights and sounds in the environment don’t make sense.

The Visual System:

  • Our eyes should work together in a teamed fashion with smooth movements to scan our environment and notice how close or far things are from our body to help us maneuver through space.

The Proprioceptive System:

  • Proprioceptive input receptors are in the muscles and joints and give information to the brain about the amount of stretch in each muscle and pressure on each joint.
  • This provides an accurate picture of the body’s position in space without the use of vision.  
  • Proprioception provides feedback for grading muscle movements and for how much force is needed to interact with an object or person in the environment.

BALANCE

Balance Expectations by age:

  • 3 year old - balance on 1 foot for 3 seconds
  • 3 year old – use alternating feet when climbing stairs
  • 4 year old - hop on 1 foot
  • 5 year old - balance on 1 foot for 10 seconds

Red Flags for Balance Difficulties

  • Child trips/falls/bumps into things often
  • Child who is fearful of movement
  • Child who seeks out movement
  • Child who appears to have good balance while moving, but poor balance when expected to stay still
  • Child who has difficulty moving through dynamic environments
  • Child who has difficulty walking across different or dynamic surfaces
  •  

HOW DO THESE SYSTEMS WORK TOGETHER?

  • Information from these body systems is processed and combined in order for a person to adapt and react to a changing environment.

HAVE A CONCERN?

Contact an occupational therapist at Child and Family Development for a standardized assessment of motor and sensory skills. Treatment modalities may include:

  • Sensory Integration
  • Core/Postural Strengthening
  • Postural Control and Stability Training
  • Balance Strategies Training
  • Visual-Motor Exercises
  • Oculomotor Training
  • Therapeutic Listening ®

Click here to read more about our occupational therapy services.

Click here for a printable page about sensory processing.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Psychological Services

How to Get the Most Out Of Therapy- Appointments and Scheduling

Friday, Jan 20, 2017 by Child & Family Development

This is the first of three HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OUT OF THERAPY AT CHILD AND FAMILY DEVELOPMENT posts. This post is about: Appointments and Scheduling 

Treatment will be determined by you & your therapist based on several factors, including:

  • the needs of your child
  • time constraints
  • available insurance benefits or other financial resources

Determine an appointment time that really works with your family’s schedule.

  • Attend all appointments and reschedule any missed appointments.
  • Consistent attendance = progress!
  • Regular attendance is required to retain a permanent appointment time.
  • Consider make-ups or coverage with another therapist if your primary therapist is not available.
  • Review our Financial Policy and Cancellation Policy for more information.

For the full document, click here.

GET STARTED NOW

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services

Kids & Teens: PAIN that doesn't go away

Monday, Jan 16, 2017 by Child & Family Development

PAIN IN CHILDREN AND TEENS

Pain in children and teens is complex and may be difficult to diagnose. In kids, the nervous and musculoskeletal systems are still developing. A child’s perception of pain is different from an adult. Children may be unable to differentiate or describe types of pain (I.e. sharp, dull and intense). Some types of pain are straightforward (i.e. post-injury) and other types require more analysis and research (i.e. pain from migraines, pain following a virus, pain after surgery, fibromyalgia, chronic pain and Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). 

Pain in children and teens is broadly referred to as Amplified Musculoskeletal Pain (AMP). Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is another name for AMP. AMP can impact physical activity, mood, school performance, sleep and many other areas. It is chronic pain.

WHAT IS CHRONIC PAIN?

The simple description is pain that lasts longer than 3 months and interferes with a person’s ability to participate in activities of daily living.  

WHAT IS CRPS/AMP?  

Either is a condition of severe localized pain. It is difficult to diagnose and is usually diagnosed by ruling out other possible conditions or diseases. Its prevalence is probably under identified in children and adolescents. It occurs in girls more often than boys. It involves the lower extremities more often than upper extremities. It can move from one extremity to another.

INDICATORS OF AMP/CRPS:

  • A known cause or event that starts the pain cycle, but not always in children
  • Severe pain with light touch or skin, pain response which is disproportionate to injury or continuous pain
  • Changes to the area affected such as swelling, blood flow, hair growth or skin color
  • No other clear cause of pain or inability to move
  • No obvious nerve damage 

EVIDENCE BASED TREATMENT

Elusive pain disorders can be very upsetting for families. Traditional medical care may fail when there is no designated reason for the pain, customary techniques are not beneficial or medications cannot or should not be sustained over a period of time.

A multidisciplinary approach is often recommended, including:

  • physical therapy
  • occupational therapy
  • psychological intervention
  • Physician-prescribed mild medications

Treatment strategies include:

  • child and caregiver education
  • relearning normal use of the affected body part
  • desensitization
  • strengthening of the affected body part
  • coping skills to manage emotional components such as relaxation and mindfulness
  • mobilizing community resources

Outcomes include:

  • restoration of function
  • pain relief
  • reduced school absenteeism
  • social inclusion, not isolation
  • improved self awareness

HAVE A CONCERN?

Child and Family Development physical therapists, occupational therapists and psychologists can help your child get back to his/her healthy, happy self. You will be amazed at the ability to retrain the brain and body!  Click below to learn more about each of these services:

Click here for a printable page about pain. 

 

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Psychological Services

How to Get the Most Out Of Therapy- experts, appointments, benefits and more!

Friday, Jan 13, 2017 by Child & Family Development

It's a new year! Child and Family Development is accepting new clients for all 5 of our core services:

For the next few Fridays, read this blog series on HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OUT OF THERAPY that will cover these topics:

  • Appointments and Scheduling
  • Home Programs and Follow-Through
  • Insurance and Financial Management

For the full document, click here.

To begin, just learn a little bit more about us:

Spend some time here. You will be surrounded by a dynamic group of people - those who work here and those who visit us.  Our focus is to maximize the potential of every child with a holistic approach to therapy. We believe that a child of any age is connected to his family, his friends and his community and makes a valuable contribution to our world.

For more than 36 years, C&FD has been working closely with children and families, physicians, schools and many others in the community.

Our offices are inviting places. The space is casual and family-friendly. We want you to feel welcome and comfortable. Our lobbies are cozy and our therapy rooms are fun. It is not uncommon to find moms, dads, siblings or other caregivers taking it easy on the lobby sofa or getting involved in the therapy rooms. We’ve found the balance of a professional office and an enjoyable place for all.

Our experienced and multidisciplinary team assists families with a wide variety of concerns and questions. Extended education and training enables us to help many people in extraordinary ways. We work with children and young adults of all ages-- from newborns to college age.

Families visit us for variety of reasons. Often, a pediatrician or teacher identifies a concern. Other times, a parent has questions about a child’s abilities and development. Some families have concerns about specific diagnoses, such as ADHD, autism, Cerebral Palsy, Down syndrome, learning disabilities and sensory processing difficulties. Others have questions about typical developmental milestones, school readiness, academic achievement and learning style. We are prepared to assist you.

Our mission statement says it all- to provide comprehensive, quality and integrated service to you.

GET STARTED NOW

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services

Child & Family Development 2017 Funding Source Summary

Tuesday, Jan 3, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Happy New Year!  In 2017, Child and Family Development continues to participate in these plans at both our Charlotte/Midtown and Pineville offices:

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY, PHYSICAL THERAPY AND SPEECH THERAPY

Aetna º Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC º Cigna º Healthgram º Medcost º NC Medicaid º Optum Health º SC Medicaid (OT, PT) º United Healthcare & Out-Of-Network and Private Pay

PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES

Aetna º Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC º Healthgram & Out-Of-Network and Private Pay

EDUCATIONAL SERVICES

Private Pay

Our Client Services Team can help you understand your benefits.

Give us a call to get started

GET STARTED NOW

 

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services

Katie Eggleston DPT attends Kinesiotaping course

Friday, Dec 30, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston DPT, physical therapist at Child and Family Development- Pineville, attended a Kinesiotaping course this month from Summit Professional Education.   

She learned the scientific basis of kinesiology taping. how to identify who will benefit, physical properties and methodology of kinesiology tape versus some other sports tapes, how to safely and effectively apply basic kinesiology taping techniques, taping applications based on client needs and indications and contraindications to kinesiology taping.  She looks forward to an upcoming course on taping techniques for orthopedic, neurological and genetic pediatric disorders. 

Katie expects to incorporate the knowledge and products into sports injury rehab, like sprains, strains and muscle pain. 

She also experienced being taped and has determined what will and will not work for the little ones she evaluates and treats.  

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

C&FD physical therapists agree: "Bundle Up and Get Outside"

Wednesday, Dec 28, 2016 by Child & Family Development

The Outdoor Recreation team at Fix recently published an article titled "Bundle Up and Get Outside: Why Kids Should Play Outside In The Winter" and the Child and Family Development physical therapy team endorses it readily.

They share, "Winter is coming, and unfortunately it’s a time where children are forced to play inside due to a negative attitude towards cold weather. This illustrated guide explains how outdoor play has many benefits to a child's health and development including: strengthening new muscles, gross motor skills development, exposure to fresh air and vitamin D, and developing problem solving skills. The article also features 12 fun outdoor activities, and tips on how to dress to combat the cold. This year, let's face winter with a positive attitude and have some real fun!"

Benefits include:

  • Children get to see the outdoors through a new lens
  • Increases in Exercise and Using Different Muscles
  • Getting Fresh Air and Avoiding Bacteria
  • New Challenges and Problem-Solving
  • Vitamin D Exposure

Activity ideas include:

  • Snow Flag
  • Spray Paint Art
  • Target Snowball
  • Nature Tic Tac Toe
  • Ice Balls
  • Snow Search
  • Ice Sculpture
  • Snowflake Magnifying
  • Frozen Bubbles
  • Light Snow
  • Snowman Hat Trick
  • Nature Walks

Read full article here

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

 

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services

Don't Take Our Word For It! Wonderful PT service

Thursday, Dec 22, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Jessica Turchin MPT ATRIC is a physical therapist at Child and Family Development- Pineville office. 

A recent client survey included a nice compliment: "Everything was WONDERFUL!  Thank you!”

Read more about Jessica's expertise and approach to pediatric therapy here.         

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

  

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Topics: Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Testimonials

Erin Krueger, physical therapist and clinical supervisor, celebrates 9 years at C&FD

Tuesday, Dec 20, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Erin Krueger

Erin Krueger DPT ATRIC is a physical therapist and Clinical Supervisor at Child and Family Development. She is celebrating years this month.   

Erin enjoys working with children to make movement fun and meaningful!  She works at both locations as well as Harris YMCA indoor pool. Each year, she adds new skills to her “toolbox” to best deliver PT, using a variety of treatment methods.  It is very important that PT is advantageous to the child not only in the office, but also at home, in school and in the community. 

A colleague shares:  

I can’t say enough about Erin. She is brilliant and knowledgeable. She has a good understanding of the body and how it works together as a whole. She is creative and crafty. The kids love her because she is fun and animated. We love her as our supervisor because she is compassionate and has the perspective of a well tenured therapist!

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger

Help Your Baby Stand with these tips from physical therapy

Friday, Nov 18, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Is your 14-16 month-old unable to stand alone? According to the Denver Developmental Screening Test- 2nd Edition: 

  • 25% of babies stand alone by 11 months
  • 50% by 11.5 months 
  • 90% by 13.5 months

After mastering sitting and crawling, most babies move onto to standing.  In order for your baby to stand alone, they must have sufficient muscle strength present in the legs, hips and core. If you have noticed your baby struggling with other milestones such as rolling, sitting, and crawling, your baby may not have properly strengthened these muscles over time.

WAYS TO ENCOURAGE STANDING

  • Put your baby in your lap with his/her feet on your legs. For more support, face your baby towards you leaning against your chest. For less support, face your baby away from you. Help your baby rock side to side or bounce up and down while supporting their upper trunk.
  • Look for opportunities for your child to play with children who are just slightly more developmentally advanced than your child. Watching other children as they figure out how to stand can encourage your child to try as well.
  • Help your baby crawl up stairs to strengthen their leg muscles.
  • If your baby avoids all contact between their feet and the floor, place them in a sitting or supine position. While in this position, gently pound their feet on the   floor so that they can get used to the feeling. You can also massage their feet using lotion or powder.
  • Lay your baby on their back. Grab their feet and gently jostle your baby by pulling and pushing them through their legs to get some “weight bearing” through their legs while laying down.  
  • Place your baby on a medicine ball lying on their stomach. Gently roll the ball backwards till their feet touch the floor and they are in a standing position. Repeat this sequence several times.

Typical child development follows a predictable pattern. Still, it takes time for babies to develop the necessary skills and muscle strength needed to perform gross motor tasks, such as standing. Certain babies simply take longer progressing through these milestones, especially babies born prematurely. If you are still concerned about your baby’s development, here are some early warning signs that should not be ignored:

EARLY WARNING SIGNS

  • Not rolling by 7 months of age
  • Not pushing up on straight arms, lifting head and shoulders, by 8 months of age
  • Not sitting independently by 10 months of age
  • Not crawling 10 months of age
  • Not pulling to stand by 12 months of age
  • Not standing alone by 14 months 
  • Not using both sides of body equally
  • Not standing when supported by 9 months or later

NEED HELP?

Contact our office to schedule a free phone consultation with a physical therapist.  Learn more about pediatric physical therapy here.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, C&FD Physical Therapy Services

Katie Eggleston DPT attends Charlotte mobility and seating conference

Monday, Nov 7, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston DPT, physical therapist at Child and Family Development- Pineville, attended this fall's NuFair by NuMotion.   

She attended various session about mobility, seating, funding and best clinical practices.   Katie helps children, teens and young adults select appropriate equipment choices and will use this knowledge and products to discern the best recommendations.

Session 1: Functional Mobility for Kids

  • Independent mobility can increase a child’s learning ability
  • The impact of intellectual disability on early mobility 
  • Pros/cons of manual vs. power wheelchairs for young children
  • Communicating about mobility equipment and funding sources

Session 2: Pediatric Seating- Clinical and Technical Aspects

  • Medical diagnoses and seating 
  • Primary and secondary equipment supports
  • Materials used for seating components
  • Contoured seating

Session 3: Coding and Reimbursement 

Session 4: Standing Wheelchairs- Applying the Evidence for Best Practice and Functional Outcomes

  • Medical diagnoses that would benefit from standing chairs
  • Research that supports the use of standing chairs
  • Benefits of a standing wheelchair compared to standard wheelchair and stationary stander
  • Medical benefits of passive standing

She also connected with various Charlotte vendors including but were not limited to:

  • Columbia Medical- P Pod positioner and Spirit Car Seat
  • Drive Medical
  • KI Mobility
  • Leggero- adaptive strollers
  • NuMotion
  • Ottobock
  • Permobil
  • Quantum
  • SleepSafe beds
  • Symmetric Designs- Free form Seating
  • Zippie

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

 

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Physical Therapy Focus: Resolving Torticollis by Jessica Turchin LPT ATRIC

Monday, Oct 31, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

October is National Physical Therapy Month and we are celebrating with the APTA #choosePT

Each physical therapist on our staff of 6 will share a bit of expertise, including Jessica Turchin MPT ATRIC!

Jessica enjoys evaluating and treating infants with torticollis, in part because quick improvements with intervention are common!

Torticollis is a tightening of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) which is a large neck muscle that runs from the mastoid process (close to the ear), through the neck and down to the sternum. The SCM function is to rotate and tilt the head.  When the SCM is tight on one side, it causes the head to tilt in that direction and rotate to the opposite direction. The muscle on the opposite side becomes overstretched and weak.  

The cause of torticollis could be related to how the child was positioned in the womb, positioning following birth during sleep or resting, a secondary effect of arching the back strongly and/or if the child is not getting the necessary amount of tummy time.  

Parents noticing that their baby tends to prefer keeping their head to one side versus the other and intervening early with recommendations from a physical therapist can lead to quick and early correction of this condition.  Activities to help resolve this condition include massage, gentle stretching and exercises to strengthen the opposite side, all done in a fun, play-based manner.  

A "wait and see" approach is generally not recommended and can lead to delays in gross motor and fine motor skills, muscle imbalances in other parts of the body and flattening of the skull one the side the child prefers.

A pediatric physical therapy evaluation and treatment usually results in habilitation of this condition and return to track of typical child development.

Learn more about our physical therapists on our website and our blog.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services

Physical Therapy Focus: Top 10 Tips For Helping Kids Succeed by Amy Sturkey

Friday, Oct 28, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

October is National Physical Therapy Month and we are celebrating with the APTA #choosePT

Each physical therapist on our staff of 6 will share a bit of expertise, including Amy Sturkey PT C/NDT!

Amy is one of the most tenured pediatric therapists on the Child and Family Development team and has almost 30 years of clinical experience! She is infamous around here for her fun-loving therapy sessions.

Here are her 10 TIPS for helping children succeed in treatment:

  1. Find something to adore in every single child. The more, the better.
  2. When you first see a child, show them you are excited to see them. My model is the family dog.  I fail at this regularly, but I really try.
  3. Honor each and every promise to the child. A child has to trust you to work hard for you.
  4. Say “Please” and “Thank you”. 
  5. Try to say at least 80% positive comments or encouragements to the child.
  6. Try to see life from the child’s eyes.  What does it feel like to be him or her?  What can I do to help that child be successful? That is MY job.
  7. Children are just like adults. They learn best when they are having  fun.
  8. Be interested in whatever the child is interested in. If you are not, fake it convincingly.
  9. For my hour with a child, I try to make sure that child feels that she or he is more important than anything else. Phone calls and distractions just have to wait.
  10. Celebrate every piece of progress with genuine enthusiasm. Show the child you believe in him, even on the tough days. You have to KNOW that she can do it. If you believe in the child unwaveringly, then he will start to believe in himself.

Learn more about our physical therapists on our website and our blog.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, C&FD Physical Therapy Services

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Child & Family Development is a multi-disciplinary pediatric clinic serving the needs of Charlotte area children and their families.

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