Occupational therapist, Meghan Davidson-Palmer, celebrates 1 year at C&FD

Wednesday, Feb 22, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Meghan Davidson-Palmer!

Meghan Davidson-Palmer MS OTR/L is an occupational therapist at Child and Family Development- Midtown.  This month, she celebrates 1 year!  

She shares these sentiments:

"In all seriousness, one of the main reasons I became an OT is so I could help people achieve more independence and lead more fulfilling lives. It's so exciting to watch kids achieve something they've been working so hard for.

In all silliness, it's nice to have a job where it's okay to do arts and crafts at work!" 

We like the balance!

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Topics: C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, Meghan Davidson-Palmer

Occupational Therapy: Out & About at the grocery store with Melissa Petcu OTR/L

Monday, Feb 13, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Melissa Petcu MS OTR/L, occupational therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, emphasizes that pediatric occupational therapy is all about "the job of living". Families can capitalize of events and activities already happening when they are out and about in the community to facilitate development and improve skills. In February, she shares:

Think it would be nice to have a helper at the grocery store? Give your child a “job” and watch their attitude change! Your child will enjoy pushing the cart with you (even a smaller one).  Kids will feel proud when they are picking out the items and placing them in the cart. I find that there are less melt downs and negotiations when the focus is on their grocery list, pushing the cart and locating the items.  Maybe the reward is one extra item of their choosing!

When you think about it, a market is a multi-sensory location with lots of opportunity for motor, strength and language activities.  It sounds a lot like the multidisciplinary approach here at C&FD!

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Melissa Petcu, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Occupational therapist, Jessica Hoffarth learns about RMTi

Tuesday, Feb 7, 2017 by Child & Family Development

The happy baby roll, maybe you've heard of it in yoga class or watched your own little one enjoy this curled up body position.  There is science behind this joy!

Jessica Hoffarth MS OTR/L, occupational therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, and some other C&FD pediatric therapists are learning all about it in their continuing education work with Rhythmic Movement Training International (RMTi)RMTI is a movement based, primitive (infant or neo-natal) reflex integration program that uses developmental movements, gentle isometric pressure and self-awareness to rebuild the foundations necessary to help overcome learning, sensory, emotional and behavioral challenges for children and adults. 

RMTi is based on the work of Kerstin Linde, a Swedish movement training specialist, who developed movements based on her observations of how infants are meant to move.  The movements are based on replicating the movements that infants naturally make.

Watch this video of a school aged child doing the happy baby roll here

Jessica is eager to continue her training and incorporate these techniques into occupational therapy sessions.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Jessica Hoffarth, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

How to Get the Most Out Of Therapy- Insurance and Financial Management

Friday, Feb 3, 2017 by Child & Family Development

This is the third of three HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OUT OF THERAPY AT CHILD AND FAMILY DEVELOPMENT posts. This post is about: Insurance and Financial Management

Getting started or managing a change:

  • Understand insurance benefits via discussions with us and your funding source.
  • Understand all insurance and other health care options that your employer may be offer and compare what is available. Compare plans when possible.      
  • Anticipate your out-of-pocket costs for the year. We can help project these figures.
  • Determine what tax preferred ways there are to fund out-of-pocket costs.
  • Obtain physician prescriptions to support therapy.
  • Communicate with C&FD Client Services Team:
    • Notify us anytime there is a change in insurance benefit or plan.
    • Notify us anytime there is a change in guarantor or policy holder.
    • Notify us anytime there is a change in primary doctors or specialists.
    • Coordinate insurance benefits for multiple services, as some plans have daily limitations.
    • Plan ahead for annual visit maximums.

At each visit:

  • Check in with the client services team prior to each visit.
    • Checking in notifies the therapist that you have arrived.
    • Checking in ensures that you stay current with insurance coverage of services and can apply your co-pay or coinsurance to your visit.
  • We use American Medical Association (AMA) diagnosis and treatment codes that all insurance companies and professionals can reference.
    • A therapist selects applicable procedure codes based on what happens during each session. Some sessions may include equipment checks, caregiver training, re-evaluation of progress to goals, or other services such as splinting or taping. Therefore, out-of-pocket costs may vary from one session to another.

For the full document, click here.

GET STARTED NOW

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services

How to Get the Most Out Of Therapy- Home Programs and Follow-Through

Friday, Jan 27, 2017 by Child & Family Development

This is the second of three HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OUT OF THERAPY AT CHILD AND FAMILY DEVELOPMENT posts. This post is about: Home Programs and Follow-Through

A therapist will share information and recommendations regularly.  

  • Review the evaluation results, treatment goals and progress reports. Ask questions!
  • Talk with the therapist at each session. Observe some or all of the treatment sessions.
  • Follow the home program. Often, you can incorporate the therapeutic activities into what you are already doing.
  • Follow therapist recommendations for other services and complete these appointments promptly.
  • Allow professionals to share information with one another by completing an Authorization for Release of Information with a member of our client services team.
  • Your therapist may suggest a variety of treatment techniques and schedule changes over the course of treatment. Have a regular and open dialogue about these suggestions.

For the full document, click here.

GET STARTED NOW

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services

Making Sense of Sensory Processing

Tuesday, Jan 24, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 

Ever know a child who seems to fall, trip and bump into things more than peers?  Many skills must be in place to support good balance and proprioception. Adequate sensory processing skills, range of motion, and strength are foundational skills required for balance and knowing where you are in space.

SENSORY PROCESSING & PROPRIOCEPTION

The Vestibular System:

  • Tells us where our heads and bodies are in relation to the surface of the earth
  • Tells us whether we are moving or standing still and whether objects are moving or motionless in relation to our body
  • Tells us about the direction in which we are moving and how fast we are moving
  • Lays a foundation for visual input
  • Without good information coming from the vestibular system, sights and sounds in the environment don’t make sense.

The Visual System:

  • Our eyes should work together in a teamed fashion with smooth movements to scan our environment and notice how close or far things are from our body to help us maneuver through space.

The Proprioceptive System:

  • Proprioceptive input receptors are in the muscles and joints and give information to the brain about the amount of stretch in each muscle and pressure on each joint.
  • This provides an accurate picture of the body’s position in space without the use of vision.  
  • Proprioception provides feedback for grading muscle movements and for how much force is needed to interact with an object or person in the environment.

BALANCE

Balance Expectations by age:

  • 3 year old - balance on 1 foot for 3 seconds
  • 3 year old – use alternating feet when climbing stairs
  • 4 year old - hop on 1 foot
  • 5 year old - balance on 1 foot for 10 seconds

Red Flags for Balance Difficulties

  • Child trips/falls/bumps into things often
  • Child who is fearful of movement
  • Child who seeks out movement
  • Child who appears to have good balance while moving, but poor balance when expected to stay still
  • Child who has difficulty moving through dynamic environments
  • Child who has difficulty walking across different or dynamic surfaces
  •  

HOW DO THESE SYSTEMS WORK TOGETHER?

  • Information from these body systems is processed and combined in order for a person to adapt and react to a changing environment.

HAVE A CONCERN?

Contact an occupational therapist at Child and Family Development for a standardized assessment of motor and sensory skills. Treatment modalities may include:

  • Sensory Integration
  • Core/Postural Strengthening
  • Postural Control and Stability Training
  • Balance Strategies Training
  • Visual-Motor Exercises
  • Oculomotor Training
  • Therapeutic Listening ®

Click here to read more about our occupational therapy services.

Click here for a printable page about sensory processing.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Psychological Services

How to Get the Most Out Of Therapy- Appointments and Scheduling

Friday, Jan 20, 2017 by Child & Family Development

This is the first of three HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OUT OF THERAPY AT CHILD AND FAMILY DEVELOPMENT posts. This post is about: Appointments and Scheduling 

Treatment will be determined by you & your therapist based on several factors, including:

  • the needs of your child
  • time constraints
  • available insurance benefits or other financial resources

Determine an appointment time that really works with your family’s schedule.

  • Attend all appointments and reschedule any missed appointments.
  • Consistent attendance = progress!
  • Regular attendance is required to retain a permanent appointment time.
  • Consider make-ups or coverage with another therapist if your primary therapist is not available.
  • Review our Financial Policy and Cancellation Policy for more information.

For the full document, click here.

GET STARTED NOW

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services

Occupational Therapy: Out & About at the park with Melissa Petcu OTR/L

Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Melissa Petcu MS OTR/L, occupational therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, emphasizes that pediatric occupational therapy is all about "the job of living". Families can capitalize of events and activities already happening when they are out and about in the community to facilitate development and improve skills. In January, she shares:

Mecklenburg County Parks & Recreation offers many locations and programs to the citizens of Charlotte.  Surrounding counties do the same.  For example, Park Road Park has some great options for our children!

  • It has a new age merry-go-round that reduces the number of kids on the equipment to just a few at one time.  This provides great rotatory input for children that seek vestibular input.
  • It has a great motor planning course- full of ropes and bars to climb across and crawl over.  This is a great way to work on motor planning and bilateral coordination.
  • There are swings and sand and stairs and slides- All activities to excite the sensory system.
  • I also like that there is equipment suitable for little siblings as well as the older ones.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Melissa Petcu, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Occupational therapist, Jessica Hoffarth, celebrates 6 years at C&FD

Wednesday, Jan 18, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Jessica Hoffarth!

Jessica Hoffarth MS OTR/L is an occupational therapist at Child and Family Development- Midtown.  This month, she celebrates 6 years!  

She shares this tidbit:

"I chose to become an OT because it is the only profession I knew that would allow me the opportunity and skill to be able to help a person excel in every aspect of their life. 

One weird thing I love about my job is socks.  I love to wear fun and funky socks and my feet are perpetually cold.  So, it's a win-win!"

What a fun fact!

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Topics: Jessica Hoffarth, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Kids & Teens: PAIN that doesn't go away

Monday, Jan 16, 2017 by Child & Family Development

PAIN IN CHILDREN AND TEENS

Pain in children and teens is complex and may be difficult to diagnose. In kids, the nervous and musculoskeletal systems are still developing. A child’s perception of pain is different from an adult. Children may be unable to differentiate or describe types of pain (I.e. sharp, dull and intense). Some types of pain are straightforward (i.e. post-injury) and other types require more analysis and research (i.e. pain from migraines, pain following a virus, pain after surgery, fibromyalgia, chronic pain and Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). 

Pain in children and teens is broadly referred to as Amplified Musculoskeletal Pain (AMP). Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is another name for AMP. AMP can impact physical activity, mood, school performance, sleep and many other areas. It is chronic pain.

WHAT IS CHRONIC PAIN?

The simple description is pain that lasts longer than 3 months and interferes with a person’s ability to participate in activities of daily living.  

WHAT IS CRPS/AMP?  

Either is a condition of severe localized pain. It is difficult to diagnose and is usually diagnosed by ruling out other possible conditions or diseases. Its prevalence is probably under identified in children and adolescents. It occurs in girls more often than boys. It involves the lower extremities more often than upper extremities. It can move from one extremity to another.

INDICATORS OF AMP/CRPS:

  • A known cause or event that starts the pain cycle, but not always in children
  • Severe pain with light touch or skin, pain response which is disproportionate to injury or continuous pain
  • Changes to the area affected such as swelling, blood flow, hair growth or skin color
  • No other clear cause of pain or inability to move
  • No obvious nerve damage 

EVIDENCE BASED TREATMENT

Elusive pain disorders can be very upsetting for families. Traditional medical care may fail when there is no designated reason for the pain, customary techniques are not beneficial or medications cannot or should not be sustained over a period of time.

A multidisciplinary approach is often recommended, including:

  • physical therapy
  • occupational therapy
  • psychological intervention
  • Physician-prescribed mild medications

Treatment strategies include:

  • child and caregiver education
  • relearning normal use of the affected body part
  • desensitization
  • strengthening of the affected body part
  • coping skills to manage emotional components such as relaxation and mindfulness
  • mobilizing community resources

Outcomes include:

  • restoration of function
  • pain relief
  • reduced school absenteeism
  • social inclusion, not isolation
  • improved self awareness

HAVE A CONCERN?

Child and Family Development physical therapists, occupational therapists and psychologists can help your child get back to his/her healthy, happy self. You will be amazed at the ability to retrain the brain and body!  Click below to learn more about each of these services:

Click here for a printable page about pain. 

 

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Psychological Services

How to Get the Most Out Of Therapy- experts, appointments, benefits and more!

Friday, Jan 13, 2017 by Child & Family Development

It's a new year! Child and Family Development is accepting new clients for all 5 of our core services:

For the next few Fridays, read this blog series on HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OUT OF THERAPY that will cover these topics:

  • Appointments and Scheduling
  • Home Programs and Follow-Through
  • Insurance and Financial Management

For the full document, click here.

To begin, just learn a little bit more about us:

Spend some time here. You will be surrounded by a dynamic group of people - those who work here and those who visit us.  Our focus is to maximize the potential of every child with a holistic approach to therapy. We believe that a child of any age is connected to his family, his friends and his community and makes a valuable contribution to our world.

For more than 36 years, C&FD has been working closely with children and families, physicians, schools and many others in the community.

Our offices are inviting places. The space is casual and family-friendly. We want you to feel welcome and comfortable. Our lobbies are cozy and our therapy rooms are fun. It is not uncommon to find moms, dads, siblings or other caregivers taking it easy on the lobby sofa or getting involved in the therapy rooms. We’ve found the balance of a professional office and an enjoyable place for all.

Our experienced and multidisciplinary team assists families with a wide variety of concerns and questions. Extended education and training enables us to help many people in extraordinary ways. We work with children and young adults of all ages-- from newborns to college age.

Families visit us for variety of reasons. Often, a pediatrician or teacher identifies a concern. Other times, a parent has questions about a child’s abilities and development. Some families have concerns about specific diagnoses, such as ADHD, autism, Cerebral Palsy, Down syndrome, learning disabilities and sensory processing difficulties. Others have questions about typical developmental milestones, school readiness, academic achievement and learning style. We are prepared to assist you.

Our mission statement says it all- to provide comprehensive, quality and integrated service to you.

GET STARTED NOW

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services

Notetaking by hand or laptop, an occupational therapy article review

Tuesday, Jan 10, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 

Jessica Hoffarth MS OTR/L is an occupational therapist at Child and Family Development- Midtown office. 

As one of our handwriting experts, she is constantly reviewing literature to stay abreast on clinical and developmental topics.

She found yet another article about the benefits of note-taking by hand versus laptop computer, posted on the NPR website.

In the study published in Psychological Science, Pam A. Mueller of Princeton University and Daniel M. Oppenheimer of the University of California, Los Angeles sought to test how note-taking by hand or by computer affects learning. They explain the differences between these two note-taking methods, along with advantages and disadvantages of each.

Mueller and Oppenheimer cited that note-taking can be categorized two ways: generative and nongenerative. Generative note-taking pertains to summarizing and paraphrasing while nongenerative note-taking involves copying something verbatim.  There are two hypotheses to why note-taking is beneficial in the first place. The first idea is called the encoding hypothesis, which says that when a person is taking notes, "the processing that occurs" will improve learning and retention. The second, called the external-storage hypothesis, is that you learn by being able to look back at your notes, or even the notes of other people.

Read full article here

  Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Jessica Hoffarth, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Kim Toomer OTR/L completes sensory integration-posture-movement course

Thursday, Jan 5, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Kim Toomer MOT OTR/L, occupational therapist at Child and Family Development- Pineville, attended a course titled Posture and Movement- How does Sensory Integration fit in? from Vital Links, the developers of Therapeutic Listening 

The course reviewed the Neurodevelopmental Treatment (NDT) problem-solving process, therapeutic handling, and clinical decision-making process when treating children who display motor and sensory difficulties with an emphasis on the interrelation between the sensory systems, neuromuscular systems, posture and movement.

Kim has a greater understanding of the importance of postural control in motor function and how it impacts everything we do. The NDT clinical decision making is also helpful with her pediatric clients. 

Read more about pediatric occupational therapy here.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

 

 

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Topics: C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, Kim Toomer

Child & Family Development 2017 Funding Source Summary

Tuesday, Jan 3, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Happy New Year!  In 2017, Child and Family Development continues to participate in these plans at both our Charlotte/Midtown and Pineville offices:

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY, PHYSICAL THERAPY AND SPEECH THERAPY

Aetna º Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC º Cigna º Healthgram º Medcost º NC Medicaid º Optum Health º SC Medicaid (OT, PT) º United Healthcare & Out-Of-Network and Private Pay

PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES

Aetna º Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC º Healthgram & Out-Of-Network and Private Pay

EDUCATIONAL SERVICES

Private Pay

Our Client Services Team can help you understand your benefits.

Give us a call to get started

GET STARTED NOW

 

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services

Occupational Therapy: December Around-The-House with Melissa Petcu

Tuesday, Dec 27, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Melissa Petcu MS OTR/L, occupational therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, emphasizes that pediatric occupational therapy is all about "the job of living". Families can capitalize of events and activities already happening around the house to facilitate development and improve skills. In December, she shares:

It is so easy to get wrapped up in the excitement of the holiday season. Some children may need a little time and attention to adjust to the different routine and environment (hello big bright Christmas tree!). For the most part, parents and kids can modulate the excitement level and finish out school with good behavior until Santa comes down the chimney with a sack full of toys.

However, we sometimes forget the adjustment AFTER Christmas. Let's prepare for the change back to routine, after the toys are played with and school is about to begin again.  Talk with your children about the end of the holiday season. Have them help you take down the ornaments and décor. Involving them with this process will help them prepare for what's ahead. 

The same can go for house guests. If your children have been anticipating the coming of extended family like grandparents, give them a calendar to mark the arrival and departure of the relatives. Talk during the visit about how many days are left with loved ones.  Involve them in planning activities to do with the relatives prior to them leaving. Preparation for arrival and departure of house guests is key!

One last thought about handling the aftermath of the holidays: there is never a better time to implement a new cleanup/toy organization routine. With the new toy additions, encourage children to  organize toys into bins or cabinets, label them with pictures or words to help ensure success with maintaining the organization. Establish some rules, such as playing with one toy at a time and putting it away prior to starting with a new one.  Practicing the rules during winter break will allow for repetition and increase likelihood of enforcing them, even after the chaos of school, work and extra curricular activities ensue after the new year.

Happy Holidays!

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Melissa Petcu, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

FUNctional visual perceptual holiday gift ideas from the C&FD Occupational Therapy team

Friday, Dec 23, 2016 by Child & Family Development

The multidisciplinary pediatric therapy team at Child and Family Development is rounding up some FUNctional gift ideas for the 2016 holiday season!

Here are some visual perceptual suggestions from our occupational therapists:

  • Find It games: Practice visual discrimination skills with this attention grabbing game for kids ages 5-15+
  • Wikki Stix: Practice line, letter and shape formations with this reusable stickable sticks. Great for kids as young as 2 with supervision and as old as 10 when copying more complex formations.
  • Magnetic Mosiac Kids Kit by Orb Factory: This toy is a fun, motivating way to practice visual discrimination skills for ages 4 and up. 
  • Day and Night Puzzle: by Smart Games: Practice visual closure skills with this creative game.  We recommend it for children ages 4-7.  Models are shown in daytime and nighttime to increase challenges. 
  • Hyper Swipe by ThinkFun: This game will have the kids and adults in your family hooked! It is great for people ages 4-adult to practice visual discrimination skills. 

Click below to find more new posts throughout December by searching HOLIDAY.

READ  OUR  BLOG    

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Topics: C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

FUNctional holiday fine motor gift ideas from the C&FD Occupational Therapy team

Monday, Dec 19, 2016 by Child & Family Development

The multidisciplinary pediatric therapy team at Child and Family Development is rounding up some FUNctional gift ideas for the 2016 holiday season!

Here are some fine motor suggestions from our occupational therapists:

  • Tobbles Neo Stacker by Fat Brain Toy Co: a favorite stacking toy for toddlers as it is forgiving and fun! 
  • Hog Wild Toys Moo/Cow Popper: This very entertaining toy is fabulous for hand strengthening.  Kids of all ages could play with this for hours.  It is available in many animal/ monster designs.
  • Frida's Fruit Fiesta by Educational Insights: This is a great alphabet game for preschoolers.  It works on hand strengthening and coordination as well as visual memory for letter identification and naming.  
  • Honeybee Tree by International Playthings: It can be adapted for children as young as 3 to over 10.  It is great for fine motor practice.  Here's a tip-- you can remove the "sticks" with the balloon clips (from Harris Teeter) instead of pinching with fingers for extra strengthening. 
  • Who Shook Hook? by Wonder Forge: This game is such a hit with children ages 4-8.  It includes a great game pieces that practice finger and hand strengthening. 
  • Helping Hands Fine Motor Tool Set by Learning Resources: The possibilities are endless with these tools.  Practice picking up dried beans or rolled up Play Dough pieces with these fun tools.
  • B. Pop Arty Beads: These are more resistant pop beads to strengthen slightly older fingers.  We recommend this for ages 6-12.  
  • Squiggle Wiggle Writer by Toysmith: This provides great proprioceptive input for sensory seekers and unique motivation for kids less interested in writing. 
  • Squiggly Worms by Pressman Toy: This game can help to improve dexterity of little fingers. We successfully used with kids ages 4-8.  

Click below to find more new posts throughout December by searching HOLIDAY.

READ  OUR  BLOG    

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Topics: C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Holiday help: 10 Non-Tech Gift ideas from a speech therapist

Thursday, Dec 15, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Stephanie Tolley MS CCC-SLP is a speech therapist at Child and Family Development- Pineville.  This month, she found a fun list in an ASHA blog titled "10 (Non-Tech) Holiday Gift Ideas to Promote Kids Language, Learning" and she loves their simple recommendations, including:

  1. Traditional toys
  2. Books
  3. Board, card and conversation-based question games
  4. Costumes and other dress-up accessories
  5. Building toys and crafts
  6. Outdoor toys
  7. Puzzles
  8. Cooking supplies
  9. Crayons, colored pencils, coloring books
  10. Tickets to child-friendly shows

Read full article for more details.  

Click below to find more new posts throughout December by searching HOLIDAY.

READ  OUR  BLOG    

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Topics: Stephanie Tolley, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Holiday Help: online gift guide to sensory vendors 

Tuesday, Dec 13, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Abbey Wash MOT OTR/L is an occupational therapist at Child and Family Development- Midtown.  This month, she discovered a gift guide from a reliable source, the STAR Institute in Denver, Colorado. 

The list includes vendors-- as well as associated products and coupon codes-- that support people with sensory processing difficulties and various disabilities.

Some highlights include:

  • Chewigum
  • Flaghouse
  • My Feelings
  • SensaCalm
  • TumblTrak

Click here to view the full guide.

Click below to find more new C&FD posts throughout December by searching HOLIDAY.

READ  OUR  BLOG    

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Topics: Abbey Wash, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

FUNctional holiday mealtime gift ideas from the C&FD Occupational Therapy team

Monday, Dec 12, 2016 by Child & Family Development

The multidisciplinary pediatric therapy team at Child and Family Development is rounding up some FUNctional gift ideas for the 2016 holiday season!

Here are some mealtime/ feeding suggestions from our occupational therapists:

  • Dinner Do's Kids Dinnerware Plates Food Faces: Play with your food! This will facilitate more food play to expose picky eaters to non-preferred foods in a less stressful way.
  • Kids Cookie Cutters: Cookie cutters help children learn to accept foods in different presentations.  Plastic ones by Wilton are safe for little fingers.
  • Constructive Eating Plate and Utensils Set: Kids are more likely to interact with non-preferred foods with this cool plate.
  • Garden Plate and Utensils Set: Same fun play with your food concept as above, with different theme/ interests.

Click below to find more new posts throughout December by searching HOLIDAY.

READ  OUR  BLOG    

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Topics: C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

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Child & Family Development is a multi-disciplinary pediatric clinic serving the needs of Charlotte area children and their families.

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  • MIDTOWN OFFICE
  • 4012 Park Road, Suite 200
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.332.4834
  • PINEVILLE OFFICE
  • 10516 Park Road
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.541.9080

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