How to Get the Most Out Of Therapy- Insurance and Financial Management

Friday, Feb 3, 2017 by Child & Family Development

This is the third of three HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OUT OF THERAPY AT CHILD AND FAMILY DEVELOPMENT posts. This post is about: Insurance and Financial Management

Getting started or managing a change:

  • Understand insurance benefits via discussions with us and your funding source.
  • Understand all insurance and other health care options that your employer may be offer and compare what is available. Compare plans when possible.      
  • Anticipate your out-of-pocket costs for the year. We can help project these figures.
  • Determine what tax preferred ways there are to fund out-of-pocket costs.
  • Obtain physician prescriptions to support therapy.
  • Communicate with C&FD Client Services Team:
    • Notify us anytime there is a change in insurance benefit or plan.
    • Notify us anytime there is a change in guarantor or policy holder.
    • Notify us anytime there is a change in primary doctors or specialists.
    • Coordinate insurance benefits for multiple services, as some plans have daily limitations.
    • Plan ahead for annual visit maximums.

At each visit:

  • Check in with the client services team prior to each visit.
    • Checking in notifies the therapist that you have arrived.
    • Checking in ensures that you stay current with insurance coverage of services and can apply your co-pay or coinsurance to your visit.
  • We use American Medical Association (AMA) diagnosis and treatment codes that all insurance companies and professionals can reference.
    • A therapist selects applicable procedure codes based on what happens during each session. Some sessions may include equipment checks, caregiver training, re-evaluation of progress to goals, or other services such as splinting or taping. Therefore, out-of-pocket costs may vary from one session to another.

For the full document, click here.

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services

How to Get the Most Out Of Therapy- Home Programs and Follow-Through

Friday, Jan 27, 2017 by Child & Family Development

This is the second of three HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OUT OF THERAPY AT CHILD AND FAMILY DEVELOPMENT posts. This post is about: Home Programs and Follow-Through

A therapist will share information and recommendations regularly.  

  • Review the evaluation results, treatment goals and progress reports. Ask questions!
  • Talk with the therapist at each session. Observe some or all of the treatment sessions.
  • Follow the home program. Often, you can incorporate the therapeutic activities into what you are already doing.
  • Follow therapist recommendations for other services and complete these appointments promptly.
  • Allow professionals to share information with one another by completing an Authorization for Release of Information with a member of our client services team.
  • Your therapist may suggest a variety of treatment techniques and schedule changes over the course of treatment. Have a regular and open dialogue about these suggestions.

For the full document, click here.

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services

Educator, Mo Froneberger expands dyslexia expertise

Monday, Jan 23, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Mary “Mo”  Froneberger, MAT, educational specialist at Child and Family Development- Pineville, completed a webinar by Learning Ally called Spotlight on Dyslexia. The focus was Assistive Technology: Solutions for Increasing Learning Independence and Classroom Participation by Marc Surabian.

Mo learned about how assistive technology allows students with disabilities, particularly learning disabilities, better participate in learning in their academic setting. Mo learned about how apps for computers and tablets can help students who have deficits in reading, math, handwriting and organization.

Mo plans to use this information to help her clients diagnosed with learning disabilities, such as dyslexia, as well as attention disorders including ADHD. She will specifically use the information to make recommendations for assistive technology fort these clients.

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, C&FD Educational Services

How to Get the Most Out Of Therapy- Appointments and Scheduling

Friday, Jan 20, 2017 by Child & Family Development

This is the first of three HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OUT OF THERAPY AT CHILD AND FAMILY DEVELOPMENT posts. This post is about: Appointments and Scheduling 

Treatment will be determined by you & your therapist based on several factors, including:

  • the needs of your child
  • time constraints
  • available insurance benefits or other financial resources

Determine an appointment time that really works with your family’s schedule.

  • Attend all appointments and reschedule any missed appointments.
  • Consistent attendance = progress!
  • Regular attendance is required to retain a permanent appointment time.
  • Consider make-ups or coverage with another therapist if your primary therapist is not available.
  • Review our Financial Policy and Cancellation Policy for more information.

For the full document, click here.

GET STARTED NOW

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services

How to Get the Most Out Of Therapy- experts, appointments, benefits and more!

Friday, Jan 13, 2017 by Child & Family Development

It's a new year! Child and Family Development is accepting new clients for all 5 of our core services:

For the next few Fridays, read this blog series on HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OUT OF THERAPY that will cover these topics:

  • Appointments and Scheduling
  • Home Programs and Follow-Through
  • Insurance and Financial Management

For the full document, click here.

To begin, just learn a little bit more about us:

Spend some time here. You will be surrounded by a dynamic group of people - those who work here and those who visit us.  Our focus is to maximize the potential of every child with a holistic approach to therapy. We believe that a child of any age is connected to his family, his friends and his community and makes a valuable contribution to our world.

For more than 36 years, C&FD has been working closely with children and families, physicians, schools and many others in the community.

Our offices are inviting places. The space is casual and family-friendly. We want you to feel welcome and comfortable. Our lobbies are cozy and our therapy rooms are fun. It is not uncommon to find moms, dads, siblings or other caregivers taking it easy on the lobby sofa or getting involved in the therapy rooms. We’ve found the balance of a professional office and an enjoyable place for all.

Our experienced and multidisciplinary team assists families with a wide variety of concerns and questions. Extended education and training enables us to help many people in extraordinary ways. We work with children and young adults of all ages-- from newborns to college age.

Families visit us for variety of reasons. Often, a pediatrician or teacher identifies a concern. Other times, a parent has questions about a child’s abilities and development. Some families have concerns about specific diagnoses, such as ADHD, autism, Cerebral Palsy, Down syndrome, learning disabilities and sensory processing difficulties. Others have questions about typical developmental milestones, school readiness, academic achievement and learning style. We are prepared to assist you.

Our mission statement says it all- to provide comprehensive, quality and integrated service to you.

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services

Don't Take Our Word For It! Above & Beyond Psycho-Educational Service

Friday, Jan 6, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Educator, Jessica DeLing MEd and psychologist, Devon Redmond PhD work in tandem regularly at Child and Family Development- Midtown to provide psychoeducational assessments to children, teens and young adults.  

A recent client survey included this comment: "We are very pleased with the services we received at C&FD!  Their experts gave so much clarification to what is going on with our son.  They truly went above and beyond to help us.  Thank you!”

Read more about psychoeducational evaluations here.          

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Topics: Jessica DeLing, Devon Redmond, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services, C&FD Testimonials

Child & Family Development 2017 Funding Source Summary

Tuesday, Jan 3, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Happy New Year!  In 2017, Child and Family Development continues to participate in these plans at both our Charlotte/Midtown and Pineville offices:

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY, PHYSICAL THERAPY AND SPEECH THERAPY

Aetna º Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC º Cigna º Healthgram º Medcost º NC Medicaid º Optum Health º SC Medicaid (OT, PT) º United Healthcare & Out-Of-Network and Private Pay

PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES

Aetna º Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC º Healthgram & Out-Of-Network and Private Pay

EDUCATIONAL SERVICES

Private Pay

Our Client Services Team can help you understand your benefits.

Give us a call to get started

GET STARTED NOW

 

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services

School placement help from C&FD Educators

Tuesday, Nov 22, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development Educational Specialists have received schooling and advanced training in administering educational evaluations, interpreting data diagnostically, and developing and implementing educational treatment plans. At minimum, they each hold a master’s degree and have extensive clinical experience developing their skill set. Our team has expertise in the treatment of learning disabilities and academic interventions. They are well connected with the educational resources of our community. Perhaps one of their most unique qualifications is that they are experienced in working collaboratively with schools and are knowledgeable about the rules and regulations that govern services within the school system.

So, as part of psychoeducational assessments or during the course of academic support or tutoring intervention, the Educator may recommend exploring different school settings and particular schools to a family. There are many options to consider:

  • Public Schools: These schools are financed by local, state and federal government funds.  In most cases, they must admit all students who live within the borders of their district.  Charter and magnet schools are relatively new sub types of public schools.
  • Charter Schools: They are independently operated public schools started by parents, teachers, community organizations, and for-profit companies. These schools receive tax dollars, but the sponsoring group may also come up with private funding. Charter schools do not charge tuition. These schools must adhere to the basic curricular requirements of the state but are free from many of the regulations that apply to conventional schools. They are not subject to the scrutiny of school boards or government authorities. Considered cutting edge, charter schools usually challenge standard education practices and sometimes specialize in a particular area, such as technology or the arts, or adopt a basic core-subjects approach. Some charter schools specifically target gifted or high-risk kids. They usually have smaller classes and offer more individual attention than conventional public schools. Online charter schools are now also an option.
  • Magnet Schools: These are free public schools that can be highly competitive and highly selective. They are known for special programs and high academic standards. They may specialize in a particular area, such as science or the arts. Students who apply to these schools may go through a rigorous testing and application process. Some magnet schools have boarding facilities to allow students from other communities to attend. Magnet schools were first launched in the 1970s to help desegregate public school systems by encouraging children to attend schools outside their neighborhoods. Student diversity is still an explicit goal of most magnet schools.
  • Public School Choice Programs:This option frees families from having to attend their assigned neighborhood school. Some districts voluntarily offer school choice. Others are required to provide parents with options when a school is failing to meet the standards set by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.
  • Private Schools: These schools rely on tuition payments and funds from nonpublic sources such as religious organizations, endowments, grants and charitable donations. These schools select from a pool of students who apply for admission. They may be coed or single sex. About a third of the elementary and secondary schools in the United States are private.
  • Independent Schools: These are private, nonprofit schools governed by boards of trustees. Independent schools draw their funds from tuition payments, charitable contributions, and endowments rather than from taxes or church funds. They may be affiliated with a religious institution but cannot receive funds or governance from them.
  • Parochial Schools: These are church-related schools, most commonly owned and operated by Catholic parishes or dioceses but also by Protestant denominations. Hebrew schools may also be termed parochial. Your child doesn't have to be Catholic or Protestant to attend a parochial school, but he/she will still be required to attend religious education classes and prayer services.
  • Propreitary Schools: These schools are private schools run for profit. This is a relatively new category of school. They do not answer to any board of trustees or elected officials, so they claim to be able to respond quickly to the demands of the market. Tuition is comparable to that of private, nonprofit schools.
  • Home Schools: Some families opt to complete academic studies at home.  They are obligated to meet state standards but have flexibility in many areas.

When student changes schools, whether starting a new grade or moving from one setting to another, our Educators can help. They developed a program called Transitions to support the student and make a plan for success. Read more about Transitions here.

Read more about our Educators here.

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Struggling at school? Try our Educational Services.

Wednesday, Nov 16, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

Educational specialists have a unique role at Child & Family Development.  They work closely with psychologists and other developmental therapists to understand the learning styles and needs of school-aged children, adolescents and young adults during psycho-educational evaluations.

We help kids, adolescents and young adults with difficulties, including but not limited to:

  • ADHD and other attention difficulties
  • Dyslexia
  • Dysgraphia
  • Learning Differences and Learning Disabilities
  • Non Verbal Learning Disorder

In addition to psycho-educational evaluations, our team offers diagnostic educational support and tutoring.  Most clients have weekly appointments, but intensive and consultative sessions are also available. Several treatment services are available, including:

  • Academic Coaching
  • College Placement, Preparation and Application Process
  • Educational Therapy
  • End-Of-Grade (EOG) Preparation 
  • Organizational Skills 
  • School Placement and Transitions 
  • School Project Support
  • Schoolwork/ Homework Help and Planning 
  • Social Skills Support 
  • Summertime Academic Intensives
  • Tutoring 
 

Learn more about educational testing and tutoring services here

Contact our office to schedule an Intake with an educator at Child and Family Development. 

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Technology and Learning Disabilities, from a teacher's perspective

Tuesday, Nov 8, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Mo Froneberger MAT, educational specialist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, recently read a great article from Frog Jump Gazette, a publication from Handwriting Without Tears®, about personalized learning for core technology skills. The author shared some great suggestions for parents and teachers including: 

  • What to look for:
    • Find tools that are flexible and promote self-directed learning to help students develop independence and confidence in their abilities.
    • Find grade-level and developmentally appropriate activities that engage children’s sense of curiosity.
    • Select digital programs that enable strong school-to-home connections.
  • How to get started:
    • Assess students before and after each lesson or activity to better understand each child’s needs and skill level 
    • Set the homework/ classroom pace, and stop and review lessons with students before moving on to the next activity
    • Allow more advanced students to skip ahead so they can continue to challenge themselves

This article emphasizes the importance of students developing computer-based skills for independent learning. These skills are critical to all students especially those with learning disabilities. 

The educators at Child and Family Development offer treatment services related to technology including use of audible books, Dragon Naturally Speaking for transcription and many apps that help with learning and executive functioning and organization.   

Read more about how an educator can help here.

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, C&FD Educational Services

Dyslexia Month Series: Structured Reading Programs by Amy Hanna MAT

Thursday, Oct 27, 2016 by Child & Family Development

October is Dyslexia Month! Our team of Educational Specialists are celebrating by sharing their expertise.

Amy Hanna MAT is an educational specialist at Child and Family Development.- Pineville and Midtown.  She shares:

Thus far for National Dyslexia Awareness Month, we have discussed identifying dyslexia, providing support through accommodations, and the importance of finding a program like Orton Gillingham designed to meet the specific needs of dyslexic students. This week, we’ll take a look at the components of effective reading instruction for students with dyslexia.

What should you expect from a program designed specifically for dyslexic students? The program will be:

  • Individualized – assesses each student’s individual needs through a pre-test, observation during lessons, and other formal tasks throughout the program
  • Deliberate – teaches concepts explicitly and deliberately (The tutor does not assume the student already knows something or will just “get it” eventually.)
  • Systematic – starts with the most basic concepts of language and progresses to more advanced through a structured, familiar lesson sequence
  • Cumulative – builds on the skills the student has mastered
  • Continuous – reviews previously mastered skills at the beginning of each lesson, and provides additional practice through listening, reading, spelling, and writing tasks

An effective program should address skills such as:

  • Phonemic Awareness- the sound structure of language
  • Phonological Awareness- associating sounds with letters
  • Syllabification- segmenting words into syllables
  • Morphology- prefixes, suffixes, roots, etc.
  • Syntax- arrangement/role of words in sentences
  • Semantics- meaning

As mentioned last week, Orton Gillingham is one well-known and highly respected program that supports the needs of students with dyslexia. All Child and Family Development educators/ tutors have training in the Orton-Gillingham method.

Read more about Amy here.  

Read more about our educational services here.

Read more about dyslexia on the National Institute of Learning Development website here.

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Topics: C&FD Educational Services

Dyslexia Month Series: Orton-Gillingham by Marie Arrington MAT

Thursday, Oct 20, 2016 by Child & Family Development

October is Dyslexia Month! Our team of Educational Specialists are celebrating by sharing their expertise.

Marie Arrington MAT is an educational diagnostician at Child and Family Development- Pineville.  She shares:

So far, we have discussed the importance of determining if your child has dyslexia as well as the accommodations your child will benefit from based on their diagnosis. Now that you have the diagnosis and accommodations in place, it is essential to intervene with a program or curriculum that is specifically targeted towards addressing the delays that children with dyslexia commonly exhibit.

This involves finding a tutor who specializes in working with children with dyslexia. Our educators have training in the Orton-Gillingham (OG) instructional approach. Tutors trained in this approach have the expertise to target the specific areas of weakness that is causing your child to struggle with reading and writing. OG is a multisensory approach that teaches children the foundational skills of reading. It was initially developed to only support children with language-based learning disorders, such as dyslexia. However, over the years, early education teachers have adopted this approach for any student because it encompasses research-based, effective strategies.  Multisensory learning occurs when learning taps into sight (visual), sound (auditory) and touch (kinesthetic). This approach is critical because people process information differently; therefore, information needs to be presented in a variety of ways.

The Orton-Gillingham approach has been used for decades, with much research supporting its efficacy as one of the best ways to teach children how to read. Orton-Gillingham is based on improving phonemic awareness and phonological skills so your child can become a fluent reader. The research gathered by the National Reading Panel in 2000 indicates there are five essential components that must be incorporated in reading instruction.

Read more about Marie here.

Read more about Orton-Gillingham services here

Read more about our educational services here.

Read more about dyslexia on the National Institute of Learning Development website here.

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Topics: Marie Arrington, C&FD Educational Services

FUNDANOODLE Play Date at C&FD: Learn the WRITE way

Wednesday, Oct 19, 2016 by Child & Family Development

C&FD is pleased to host a Fundanoodle event! 

Fundanoodle Senior Ambassador, Catherine Hecksher, Amy Hanna MAT, C&FD Educational Specialist and Meghan Davidson-Palmer MS OTR/L, C&FD Occupational Therapist will connect play and child development. 

Who: For Parents & Caregivers; you may bring one 3-6 year-old!

When: Saturday, December 3rd @ 10-11am

Where: Child & Family Development– Midtown, 4012 Park Road, Suite 200, Charlotte NC 28209

Why: The Fundanoodle Ambassador will present Max & Alphie products and kits.  The Child & Family Development educator and occupational therapist will share information about developmental milestones.

  • Learn about products and kits that support child development
  • Engage with your child and enjoy interactive activities
  • Expert Q&A with Fundanoodle representatives and C&FD staff
  • Shop! Holidays are coming!! 

Space is limited so RSVP to reserve your spot here

  Sign up for C&FD News

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Topics: C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Seminars, Meghan Davidson-Palmer

FREE SEMINAR: Reading Support for Students

Friday, Oct 14, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

FREE SEMINAR: READING SUPPORT FOR STUDENTS

PRESENTED BY: 

Amy Hanna, MAT Educational Specialist and Jessica DeLing, MEd Educational Specialistand Jessica DeLing, MEd Educational Specialist will present ways to support reading comprehension at home.    Activities and topics will include:

  • Using question stems to increase comprehension
  • Creating a “Reading Response” journal to extend comprehension to a written response
  • Understanding text types and using graphic organizers to help students understand what they read
  • Simple strategies to address anxiety about reading

EVENT DETAILS: 

Thursday, November 17, 2016

6:15-7:15 PM 

Child and Family Development- Midtown office, 4012 Park Road, Charlotte, NC, 28209

Space is limited so RSVP to reserve your spot here

  Sign up for C&FD News

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Topics: Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Seminars

Dyslexia Month Series: accommodations for school and home by Jessica DeLing MEd

Thursday, Oct 13, 2016 by Child & Family Development

October is Dyslexia Month! Our team of Educational Specialists are celebrating by sharing their expertise.

Jessica DeLing M.Ed. is an educational diagnostician at Child and Family Development- Midtown.  She shares:

So far, we have discussed the importance of determining if your child has dyslexia via a psychoeducational assessment. Next up is accommodations! 

Students with dyslexia often require, and can greatly benefit from accommodations, in both the academic setting and at home. Individuals diagnosed with dyslexia may not just have difficulties with reading. Dyslexia can impact various skill sets such as spelling, writing, arithmetic, and sequencing.   Based on specific student needs, accommodations may vary. Providing these tools, and teaching the students how to use the accommodations to support their learning, is so important in helping the dyslexic student reach their full academic potential.  

Although there are a variety of accommodations, check out the information and links below to start researching which accommodations might work best for your dyslexic student:

Some example accommodations include: 

  • Allow the student to complete written assignments using Online dictation  or allowing the student to use a computer, will be beneficial.
  • Read aloud test questions. For tests of reading, allow the student to read out loud to his/herself. Consider allowing the student to test and a separate setting as they will likely need more time to complete work.
  • Clarify or simplify written directions.
  • Use visual presentations of verbal material, such as glossaries and word banks across content areas.
  • Provide advanced copies of class notes and/ or completed study guides.
  • Work with fewer items per page/line. Help the student learn how to independently breakdown large assignments into smaller tasks.
  • Allow the student to learn content from a variety of digital media resources including audiobooks, movies, and videos.

Read more about Jessica here

Read more about our educational services here.

Read more about dyslexia on the National Institute of Learning Development website here.

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Topics: Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

Dyslexia Month Series: Evaluating & Diagnosing by Mo Froneberger MAT

Thursday, Oct 6, 2016 by Child & Family Development

October is Dyslexia Month! Our team of Educational Specialists are celebrating by sharing their expertise.

Mary "Mo" Froneberger MAT is an educational diagnostician at Child and Family Development- Pineville.  She shares:

One of my greatest passions is evaluating and helping individuals with dyslexia. It is very important for parents and educators to know about dyslexia as approximately 15-20% of the population experiences symptoms of dyslexia.

Dyslexia is not correlated with physical difficulties with the eyes or ears. Instead it is a language-based processing disorder rooted in deficits in the phonological region of language. The International Dyslexia Association developed this definition in 2002:

“Dyslexia is characterized by difficulties with accurate and / or fluent word recognition and by poor spelling and decoding abilities. These difficulties typically result from a deficit in the phonological component of language that is often unexpected in relation to other cognitive abilities and the provision of effective classroom instruction. Secondary consequences may include problems in reading comprehension and reduced reading experience that can impede growth of vocabulary and background knowledge.”

There are common characteristics and warning signs of dyslexia particularly in school-aged children:

  1. Difficulty learning alphabet letter names and/or sounds
  2. Oral reading is slow or labored
  3. Reads with substitutions, adds words or guesses at words
  4. Poor decoding skills (not able to properly “sound out a word”)
  5. Poor spelling skills (often individuals with dyslexia will spell words correctly on a spelling test, but are not able to generalize into other day-to-day writing assignments)
  6. Poor fine motor skills
  7. Poor handwriting
  8. Trouble with recall or retrieval of math facts, especially quick retrieval
  9. Writes or reads letters and/or numbers reversed
  10. Doesn't enjoy reading
  11. Doesn't enjoy writing

Diagnosis of dyslexia involves psychological-educational testing. It is important that clinicians evaluating for dyslexia have training and experience with this type of learning disability.

Read more about Mo here.

Read more about our educational services here.

Read more about psychoeducational assessments here.

Read more about dyslexia on the National Institute of Learning Development website here.

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, C&FD Educational Services

Good handwriting and broken crayons, ideas from an educator (and a mom)

Monday, Sep 26, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Mo Froneberger MAT, educational specialist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, recently read a great article from Frog Jump Gazette, a publication from Handwriting Without Tears®, about how to support handwriting skills in the classroom. The author shared some great suggestions for early elementary school aged students including: 

  • Provide crayons and pencils that are short or broken. This helps students grasp the pencil appropriately with their fingers.

Mo recalls that the occupational therapists here have a saying: “little hands need little utensils” and realizes that this includes writing tools! 

Read more about how an educator can help here.

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, C&FD Educational Services

Reading comprehension: easy tips for book time at home 

Thursday, Sep 15, 2016 by Child & Family Development

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Topics: C&FD Educational Services

Child and Family Development welcomes educator, Amy Hanna

Thursday, Aug 25, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Amy Hanna MAT, joined the Child and Family Development team this month.     

Amy is an Orton-Gillingham trained educational specialist who works at both the Pineville and Midtown offices.  

Amy has 10 years of experience in working with children and teens. Prior to joining the C&FD team, she taught in Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools and provided Orton-Gillingham based instruction in phonics, guided reading, and comprehension strategies to struggling readers. She was selected as a Fellow of the U.S. Department of State and relocated to South Africa, where she trained local teachers in vocabulary, guided reading, and reading comprehension strategies.  Her work continued with the Department of State, writing articles for the academic journal English Teaching Forum and developing training materials for educators. 

As an educator, her passion is teaching phonics and reading.  Her favorite part of working with students is seeing their confidence grow as they become successful readers.

Welcome Amy!  

Read more about our educational services here.         

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Topics: C&FD Educational Services

Need help with Back To School?

Thursday, Aug 25, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Back To School is a package of therapy sessions for students making an academic change. It is appropriate for all kids, but especially when they are:

o   rising into a new grade level

o   retained or reclassed for a grade level

o   starting at a new school

o   transitioning to a new school environment during the year 

This service is offered by our Educational Specialists, all of whom have experience as teachers in our local public school systems. The Educational Specialists provide the therapy a student requires to overcome academic challenges. They are experienced in evaluating and treating the underlying learning deficits in the diagnostic subtypes including dyslexia, dysgraphia, dyscalculia and non verbal learning disorder. They develop a holistic treatment plan which addresses each student’s individual learning needs as their difficulties impact school success.

It includes 6 sessions that usually occur just before and in the first month or so of the new school year.

Objectives

The program is designed to be an enjoyable way for students to build confidence and academic skills specific to their age and grade level expectations. It is customized based on individual goals.  Students will learn about personal learning styles and organizational strategies that can be applied to their coursework and school environment.  The Educator provides regular session summaries, suggestions and resource ideas to parents.    

Scheduling

Appointments are available, according to your family’s schedule.  We recommend two sessions before the start of the school year, followed by four sessions scheduled within the first 4-6 weeks of school.    Follow-up consultations may also be beneficial.  We suggest scheduling those by semester or during holiday breaks.

Cost  

Cost may vary based on the number and length of sessions.  The sessions are priced at our reduced rate as follows, based on the Educational Services Agreement:  

o   30 minute session: $32.50

o   45 minute session: $48.75

o   60 minute session:  $65.00

Contact 

Jessica DeLing, M.Ed., Educational Specialist

jdeling@childandfamilydevelopment.com

704-332-4834 ext. 123

Read more about our educational services here

Info page about Back To School package here

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Topics: Jessica DeLing, C&FD Educational Services

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insights is a helpful blog brought to you by Child & Family Development

Child & Family Development is a multi-disciplinary pediatric clinic serving the needs of Charlotte area children and their families.

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Contact

  • MIDTOWN OFFICE
  • 4012 Park Road, Suite 200
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.332.4834
  • PINEVILLE OFFICE
  • 10516 Park Road
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.541.9080

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