Rethinking tummy time, expert advice from Ann Guild MACCCSLP C/NDT

Thursday, Jan 26, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Ann Guild MA CCC-SLP C/NDT is a speech therapist at Child and Family Development- Midtown in Charlotte.  Ann is our most tenured and experienced speech- language pathologist on staff.  She has much advanced training including Neurodevelopmental Treatment™ (NDT) certification, which qualifies her to incorporate neuromotor components into her evaluation and treatment of children and teens.

Ann has prepared a helpful guide for families of little ones that is all about gravity and includes important body positions for holding, eating and resting. She shares:

A lot has been written about tummy time and how to help parents be more comfortable putting their infants on their tummies. Despite all the advice, parents remain reluctant to leave their crying infants on their tummies for very long.  The problem is not the importance of tummy time, but in the name itself. Tummy time implies that infants need to be put down on their tummies for extended periods during the day. The more important consideration is the need to provide options during the day that counteract or balance the extended period of time spent on their backs at night.

When the force of gravity is coming at an infant’s face and mouth during back lying, the tongue is pulled back into the throat. If during the day, the child stays on their back or reclined in a carrier, the tongue cannot come forward into the mouth for eating and later for talking. They become overwhelmed by gravity.

 BACK TO SLEEP

 SUPINE IN A CARRIER

Babies in daycare are especially at risk. Helping parents advocate for positioning options for their babies can be big step in helping these children thrive.

More common positioning and carrying that keeps the child vulnerable to the effect of gravity are pictured below. These positions allow gravity to pull the tongue back in the mouth making eating difficult.

 CARRYING IN SUPINE

 FEEDING IN SUPINE

 SUPINE IN BASSINET FOR NAPS

 SUPINE IN PILLOW FOR NAPS

In my practice as a Speech-Language Pathologist, the children I see most are otherwise typical babies who have difficulty taking the bottle or breast or later making the transition to solid food. Their difficulty comes from the force of gravity pulling the tongue back in the mouth during their many hours of back lying at night and sitting reclined in a carrier or lying on their backs during the day. We can eliminate this feeding difficulty for many typical infants by simply focusing on positioning, carrying, holding, and feeding them in positions that minimize or balance the effect of gravity on the mouth.  When we see otherwise typical babies at 3-4 months, who are not eating well, we can tell the moms that there is no food aversion or eating problem. We can say that their baby is overwhelmed by gravity.

If the feeding issues have already begun, they can be reversed by concentrating on positioning. The need to focus on positioning is most important for the first 3-4 months. Once children start to move and roll, they learn to manage gravity by themselves. If they have been left in supine, this may not happen without help.

Here are some examples of positioning and carrying options that allow the tongue to come forward in the mouth for eating and eventually for talking.

 CARRYING ON SHOULDER

 PRONE IN LAP

 PRONE IN LAP

 PRONE ON QUILT IN LAP

 ON MOM'S SHOULDER

 CARRYING IN SIDE LYING OVER MOM'S ARM

 ON MOM'S CHEST

 IN CARRIER WRAP

 NAP ON BOPPY

 NAP ON MOM'S CHEST

 FEEDING IN SITTING

When parents understand the process and are successful and creative in carrying, holding, positioning, and feeding their babies in a way that balances the time spent on their backs at night; they are empowered and their infants thrive.

Read more about Ann Guild's expertise and services here.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

Read More

Topics: Ann Guild, C&FD Speech Therapy Services

Don't Take Our Word For It! Knowledge & Experience

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Ann Guild MA CCC-SLP is a speech therapist and a swallowing/ feeding difficulties specialist at Child and Family Development- Midtown office. 

A recent client survey provided this praise: "We were extremely pleased with the speech therapy our son received.  Ann is very knowledgeable and experienced.”

Read more about Ann's approach to pediatric therapy here.       

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist   

Read More

Topics: Ann Guild, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Testimonials

What is Speech Therapy?

Wednesday, May 18, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

 

Speech therapists can help with communication, eating and more. 

We provide services to children, teens and young adults with developmental, neurological and congenital impairments.  Services can be habilitative (learning a skill for the first time) or rehabilitative (becoming more proficient at a skill or relearning a skill).  We focus on improving a child's ability to interact with and enjoy his environment.  

If you notice difficulties in one or more of these areas, an evaluation and treatment may be appropriate: 

  • Articulation/ Phonemic Awareness
  • Auditory Processing 
  • Communication
  • Oral Movement for speech and eating 
  • Phonological Awareness/ Phonological Processing
  • Voice/ Fluency 

Some of our speech therapy specialty services are:

Click here for more information on the Child and Family Development speech therapists at our Charlotte and Pineville offices!

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

 

Read More

Topics: Stephanie Tolley, Allison Parker, Ann Guild, Melinda Schatz, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, Kristin Lyman, Lisa Peterson

Ann Guild, speech therapist, celebrates 27 years at C&FD

Thursday, May 5, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Ann Guild 

Ann Guild is our most tenured and more experienced speech therapist.  She is celebrating 27 years at Child and Family Development this month.   

Ann holds a Neuro-Developmental Treatment™ (NDT) certification and a Vital Stim™ certification.  It can be difficult to get her to tout her own expertise but here is how she got started in her speech therapy career: 

I knew in school that I wanted to work with young children.  After graduate school, my real education as a therapist began as I took courses and found mentors in neurodevelopmental treatment (NDT), other oral motor therapies and early language development.  Through teaching workshops and becoming an instructor in the NDTA Certification courses, my understanding of the therapeutic process grew.  My ‘bucket’ of treatment techniques is always growing.  I enjoy teaching others and continue to mentor speech therapists and occupational therapists at C&FD. 

A colleague shares:  

Having known Ann for 27 years now, I am still amazed by her depth of knowledge about and dedication to the most vulnerable and neurologically complex children in the areas of feeding and language.  Her expertise is unsurpassed in our region.  She is a wonderful asset to this practice and a cherished friend.  Congratulations on an amazing career, and I am very glad you have shared so much of it with us.

Read More

Topics: Ann Guild, C&FD Speech Therapy Services

May is Better Speech and Hearing Month!

Monday, May 2, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 


May is Better Speech and Hearing Month and we are celebrating with our team.  

MIDTOWN

  • Amy Elder MA CCC-SLP
  • Ann Guild MA CCC-SLP
  • Allison Parker MA CCC-SLP
  • Melinda Schatz MS CCC-SLP

PINEVILLE

  • Kristin Lyman MA CCC-SLP
  • Lisa Peterson MS CCC-SLP
  • Stephanie Tolley MS CCC-SLP 

Click here for more information about the speech therapists at Child and Family Development!

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

 


Read More

Topics: Stephanie Tolley, Allison Parker, Ann Guild, Melinda Schatz, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, Kristin Lyman, Lisa Peterson

Speech therapist, Ann Guild, celebrates 26 years at Child and Family Development

Friday, May 29, 2015 by Child & Family Development

team.annguildAnn Guild marks 26 years at Child and Family Development this month! She is a speech therapist at the Midtown office.  

It can be a challenge to get Ann to open up about her vast experience and expertise, but here is what she would say: 

  • The opportunity to work with the other disciplines is very important to me. I get to work with the kinds of kids I love in a comfortable and inviting space.      
  • Child and Family Development helps me make the most of every speech therapy session by providing space, equipment, vendor relationships, and most importantly an environment to develop rapport with clients and families and interact with other team members, like occupational therapists, physical therapists and psychologists.  

We agree with Ann 100%:  C&FD is the only place in Charlotte where this many therapists work collaboratively under one roof.  This alone tells families that our mission is to support them fully.  

Happy C&FD Anniversary!

Read more about speech therapy services here.  

Want to learn more about our team? 

Sign up for C&FD News

Read More

Topics: Ann Guild

Is my child ready for preschool?

Thursday, May 21, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Preschool is a wonderful introduction to the school setting. Fun, play, and academics are incorporated to prepare your young child for the increased academic demands of kindergarten and elementary school. 

Based on the standards and expectations expressed by the North Carolina State Board of Education, a preschooler should be have the following receptive and expressive language skills:

rbkm_93_7

RECEPTIVE LANGUAGE 

  • understand sentences of increasing length and complexity, including past, present, and future tenses
  • understand a growing number of words
  • attend for longer periods of time, such as when books are read, people are telling stories, and during conversations
  • consistently answer questions and follow two-step directions
  • understand and talk about feelings, ideas, information, and beliefs
  • understand non-verbal communication, such as gestures and facial expressions

EXPRESSIVE LANGUAGE 

  • use verbal and nonverbal language to communicate for a variety of purposes
  • use language in pretend play 
  • use language to make and keep friends 
  • follow a conversation by asking a question or making a comment
  • communicate using appropriate inflection, tone of voice, and expression
  • use more and more complex language forms, grammar, and vocabulary

A pediatric speech-language therapy evaluation can determine existing and emerging skills.  

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

All of our therapists have Masters degrees and are licensed by the state of North Carolina.  We do not employ assistants or aides. We are in-network with many insurance plans, including Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield NC, Cigna, Medcost, North Carolina Medicaid, Primary Physician Care and United Health Care.  Our clients also may pay privately and access out-of-network benefits.

Contact our office to get started

 

Read More

Topics: Stephanie Tolley, Allison Parker, Ann Guild, Melinda Schatz

Speech Therapists celebrating Better Speech and Hearing Month!

Friday, May 1, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Brochure_SpeechOur team of 9 speech therapists is celebrating better speech and hearing this month!

MIDTOWN OFFICE  PINEVILLE OFFICE

Allison Parker, MA, CCC-SLP

Ann Guild, MA, CCC-SLP

Amy Gossett, MA, CCC-SLP

Melinda Bumgardner, MA, CCC-SLP

Jayne Walton, MA, CCC-SLP (afternoons)

Barb Hartshorn, MS, CCC-SLP

Michelle Pentz, MS, CCC-SLP

Stephanie Gerlich, MS, CCC-SLP

Lisa Peterson, MS, CCC-SLP (community) 

All of our therapists have Masters degrees and are licensed by the state of North Carolina.  We do not employ assistants or aides. We are in-network with many insurance plans, including Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield NC, Cigna, Medcost, North Carolina Medicaid, Primary Physician Care and United Health Care.  Our clients also may pay privately and access out-of-network benefits.

 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist   

Read More

Topics: Stephanie Tolley, Allison Parker, Ann Guild, Melinda Schatz, C&FD Speech Therapy Services

What should a 6-month-old be eating?

Tuesday, Jan 6, 2015 by Child & Family Development

A good time to start introducing solids for your baby is around 6 months of age. However, keep in mind that breast milk and/or formula is the main source of nutrition for your child until they turn 1-year-old. So,  this time is for exploration, experimentation, and learning for you and baby.  They will make a mess, which is a great sensory experience for them so be ready for a clean up!

Read More

Topics: Allison Parker, Abbey Wash, Megan Bevington, Courtney Stanley, Ann Guild

Prematurity and its impact on the school years

Friday, Jan 2, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Consequences of a child's premature birth can follow them into the school years

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY AND PHYSICAL THERAPY

These children may be described as clumsy or uncoordinated. They may have difficulty acquiring complex motor skills such as skipping, hopping or doing jumping jacks, as well as poor physical endurance when compared to peers. 

SPEECH AND LANGUAGE

In addition, these children may have difficulty following directions in the classroom, remembering assignments or learning to read. 

EDUCATION AND ACADEMIC SUPPORT

Research indicates children born three months prematurely are 3-4 times more likely to struggle in school than full-term peers and can have learning disabilities that persist through the teenage years.  

CHILD PSYCHOLOGY

One study found that premature children had higher levels of anxiety, depression, aggression and lower self concepts than full-term peers. 

The multi-disciplinary team of pediatric therapists at Child and Family Development in Charlotte offers an array of services for children from infancy into young adulthood.  

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Schedule a free phone consultation with:  Physical Therapist Occupational Therapist Speech Therapist

Read More

Topics: Marion Wilm, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Chris Vrabel, Allison Parker, Gail Fennimore, Ann Guild, Devon Redmond

Prematurity and its impact on the preschool years

Monday, Dec 29, 2014 by Child & Family Development

Consequences of a child's premature birth can follow them into the preschool years. Skill development remains important.    

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY AND PHYSICAL THERAPY

Mild delays in gross motor skills make it difficult for children to keep up with peers as academic and physical demands increase.  These children may demonstrate poor safety awareness during motor activities, appear clumsy with frequent falls and display immature running, jumping, and balance skills.

SPEECH AND LANGUAGE AND SOCIAL SKILLS

kids may get behind in age-appropriate social skills, speech intelligibility or vocabulary organization and understanding of contingent behavior, i.e. consequences.

The multi-disciplinary team of pediatric therapists at Child and Family Development in Charlotte offers an array of services for children from infancy into young adulthood.  

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Schedule a free phone consultation with:  Physical Therapist Occupational Therapist Speech Therapist

Read More

Topics: Marion Wilm, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Chris Vrabel, Allison Parker, Gail Fennimore, Ann Guild, Devon Redmond

Neuro-Developmental Treatment (NDT) at Child and Family Development

Monday, Dec 8, 2014 by Child & Family Development

According to the Neuro-Developmental Treatment (NDT) Association, the NDT Approach is used for management and treatment of individuals with central nervous system (CNS) pathphysiology. The individual's strengths and impairments are identified and addressed in relation to functional abilities and limitations. The NDT Approach continues to evolve with the emergence of new theories, models, research, and information in the movement sciences. NDT is a hands-on, problem solving approach. Intervention involves direct handling and guidance to optimize function. The approach is guided by the client's reactions throughout every treatment session.

ndta-1

Read More

Topics: Amy Sturkey, Marion Wilm, Gail Fennimore, Ann Guild

Ann Guild celebrates 25 years at Child and Family Development

Wednesday, May 28, 2014 by Child & Family Development

Ann Guild marks 25 YEARS this month! She is a Speech Therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development.

Read More

Topics: Ann Guild

Don't Take Our Word For It about Speech Therapy!

Sunday, May 11, 2014 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development's team of speech and language therapists are getting great reviews from parents!

Read More

Topics: Ann Guild, Melinda Schatz

follow us

About

insights is a helpful blog brought to you by Child & Family Development

Child & Family Development is a multi-disciplinary pediatric clinic serving the needs of Charlotte area children and their families.

CONTACT US TODAY TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT

Contact

  • MIDTOWN OFFICE
  • 4012 Park Road, Suite 200
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.332.4834
  • PINEVILLE OFFICE
  • 10516 Park Road
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.541.9080

latest news

General
The information contained in this website is intended to provide general educational information and client education on certain topics only and is not intended to offer healthcare/medical advice. This information should not be considered complete and should not be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice from a licensed healthcare professional. Child and Family Development is not liable or responsible for any advice, course of treatment, diagnosis or any other information or services you obtain through this website. If you have, or suspect you have, a health problem you should never disregard medical advice or delay seeking medical attention because of something you have read on this website. Never rely on information on this website in place of seeking professional medical advice. If you have questions about a medical condition or seek advice, see your healthcare professional immediately.

Links
Links from our website to other websites are provided as a service to help users find appropriate information. Absolutely no responsibility is taken by Child and Family Development or its employees for the accuracy of the information you may receive from any of the referred links. If you have questions about a medical condition or seek medical advice, contact your healthcare professional.