Help Your Baby Stand with these tips from physical therapy

Friday, Nov 18, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Is your 14-16 month-old unable to stand alone? According to the Denver Developmental Screening Test- 2nd Edition: 

  • 25% of babies stand alone by 11 months
  • 50% by 11.5 months 
  • 90% by 13.5 months

After mastering sitting and crawling, most babies move onto to standing.  In order for your baby to stand alone, they must have sufficient muscle strength present in the legs, hips and core. If you have noticed your baby struggling with other milestones such as rolling, sitting, and crawling, your baby may not have properly strengthened these muscles over time.

WAYS TO ENCOURAGE STANDING

  • Put your baby in your lap with his/her feet on your legs. For more support, face your baby towards you leaning against your chest. For less support, face your baby away from you. Help your baby rock side to side or bounce up and down while supporting their upper trunk.
  • Look for opportunities for your child to play with children who are just slightly more developmentally advanced than your child. Watching other children as they figure out how to stand can encourage your child to try as well.
  • Help your baby crawl up stairs to strengthen their leg muscles.
  • If your baby avoids all contact between their feet and the floor, place them in a sitting or supine position. While in this position, gently pound their feet on the   floor so that they can get used to the feeling. You can also massage their feet using lotion or powder.
  • Lay your baby on their back. Grab their feet and gently jostle your baby by pulling and pushing them through their legs to get some “weight bearing” through their legs while laying down.  
  • Place your baby on a medicine ball lying on their stomach. Gently roll the ball backwards till their feet touch the floor and they are in a standing position. Repeat this sequence several times.

Typical child development follows a predictable pattern. Still, it takes time for babies to develop the necessary skills and muscle strength needed to perform gross motor tasks, such as standing. Certain babies simply take longer progressing through these milestones, especially babies born prematurely. If you are still concerned about your baby’s development, here are some early warning signs that should not be ignored:

EARLY WARNING SIGNS

  • Not rolling by 7 months of age
  • Not pushing up on straight arms, lifting head and shoulders, by 8 months of age
  • Not sitting independently by 10 months of age
  • Not crawling 10 months of age
  • Not pulling to stand by 12 months of age
  • Not standing alone by 14 months 
  • Not using both sides of body equally
  • Not standing when supported by 9 months or later

NEED HELP?

Contact our office to schedule a free phone consultation with a physical therapist.  Learn more about pediatric physical therapy here.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, C&FD Physical Therapy Services

Physical Therapy Focus: Top 10 Tips For Helping Kids Succeed by Amy Sturkey

Friday, Oct 28, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

October is National Physical Therapy Month and we are celebrating with the APTA #choosePT

Each physical therapist on our staff of 6 will share a bit of expertise, including Amy Sturkey PT C/NDT!

Amy is one of the most tenured pediatric therapists on the Child and Family Development team and has almost 30 years of clinical experience! She is infamous around here for her fun-loving therapy sessions.

Here are her 10 TIPS for helping children succeed in treatment:

  1. Find something to adore in every single child. The more, the better.
  2. When you first see a child, show them you are excited to see them. My model is the family dog.  I fail at this regularly, but I really try.
  3. Honor each and every promise to the child. A child has to trust you to work hard for you.
  4. Say “Please” and “Thank you”. 
  5. Try to say at least 80% positive comments or encouragements to the child.
  6. Try to see life from the child’s eyes.  What does it feel like to be him or her?  What can I do to help that child be successful? That is MY job.
  7. Children are just like adults. They learn best when they are having  fun.
  8. Be interested in whatever the child is interested in. If you are not, fake it convincingly.
  9. For my hour with a child, I try to make sure that child feels that she or he is more important than anything else. Phone calls and distractions just have to wait.
  10. Celebrate every piece of progress with genuine enthusiasm. Show the child you believe in him, even on the tough days. You have to KNOW that she can do it. If you believe in the child unwaveringly, then he will start to believe in himself.

Learn more about our physical therapists on our website and our blog.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, C&FD Physical Therapy Services

Charlotte Observer story of perseverance that includes C&FD occupational therapist & physical therapist

Monday, Oct 24, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

Child and Family Development is so proud to be part of this story of perseverance!

Please read the piece by Scott Fowler in Charlotte Observer October 23 edition: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/sports/spt-columns-blogs/scott-fowler/article109620807.html

Two of our pediatric therapists were included and the author did a beautiful job capturing the joy of small successes of therapy sessions:

  Read more about C&FD in the news here.

SEEN & HEARD

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Abbey Wash, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Testimonials

National Physical Therapy Month #choosePT

Friday, Sep 30, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

October is National Physical Therapy Month and we are celebrating with the APTA #choosePT

Pediatric physical therapy is not just rehabilitation of injuries or therapy for “little adults”. While it certainly includes rehabilitation from sports injuries, post-surgery, broken bones and other conditions, it more commonly addresses “habilitation” rather than “re-habilitation”. That is, we are working with children to develop gross motor skills for the first time, rather than regain skills after a loss.  This “habilitation” often occurs when there is a gross motor delay related to late crawling and late walking.  At times, a delay is present in conjunction with a medical diagnosis, such as cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, mitochondrial disorder and spina bifida, to name just a few.

STAFF:

MIDTOWN OFFICE

Gail Fennimore PT, PCS, C/NDT

Jill Pfund DPT

Amy Sturkey LPT, C/NDT

PINEVILLE OFFICE

Katie Eggleston DPT

Erin Krueger DPT, ATRIC

Jessica Turchin MPT, ATRIC

SPECIALTY SERVICES INCLUDE:

  • Adaptive Equipment Assessment & Management
  • Aquatic Therapy at Harris YMCA
  • Constraint Induced Movement Therapy
  • Craniosacral Therapy (CST)
  • Karate Groups
  • Kinesiotaping® & Strapping
  • Learning To Ride A Bike
  • Neurodevelopmental Treatment™ (NDT)
  • Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES)
  • Pelvic Floor Dysfunction
  • Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation
  • Serial Casting
  • Sports Rehab & Training
  • Total Motion Release® (TMR)

Learn more about our physical therapists on our website and our blog.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Gail Fennimore, Katie Eggleston

Amy Sturkey, celebrates 28 years at Child and Family Development

Monday, Aug 22, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Amy Sturkey LPT C/NDT marks 28 years at Child and Family Development this month! She is a physical therapist at the Midtown office.    

We are so very proud of her clinical work here, including a feature on an upcoming 8/23/16 HBO Real Sports With Bryant Gumbel story about the handsome young man pictured here. 

Amy has many professional achievements outside of the office.  Amy has developed a pediatric exercise application for Android and Itunes, several YouTube videos and is authoring a series of books--- all about helping people! 

A colleague shares:

Amy has an obvious and infectious passion for helping children and their families. She is a constant source of positive energy, knowledge, and laughter!

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, C&FD Physical Therapy Services

Don't Take Our Word For It! Physical Therapy praise

Wednesday, Jul 27, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Amy Sturkey, PT C/NDT is one of the most experienced and tenured physical therapists at Child and Family Development. 

A recent client survey provided this praise: "We are extremely pleased with our physical therapist and with C&FD!”

Read more about Amy's approach to pediatric therapy here.     

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Testimonials

Learn to ride a bike in physical therapy

Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Amy Sturkey LPT is an experienced and highly trained physical therapist at Child and Family Development in Charlotte. 

 

 

During Amy's 20+ year physical therapy career, she has helped kids, teens and young adults reach their potential with everything from learning to crawl, stand, walk, run, ride a bike, and much more.

This summer, her goal is to help young people get rolling! 

She shares, "I think people start too hard when they try to teach their child to ride a bike.  I often address the necessary skills separately before working on all the skills together."

 

  • A child needs to be able to steer pushing a shopping cart and a low riding toy when they are being pushed before he or she should be expected to steer and pedal a bike.  
  • Balance is important too. Typically a 5 year old can learn to ride a bike.  A 5-year-old can balance on either foot for 10 seconds with hands on hips.  Keep the training wheels if your child can’t balance 10 seconds well on each foot.   
  • Many children have trouble monitoring their environment.  I work a lot on the child practicing negotiating moving obstacle courses on their own 2 feet before expecting a child to do that on a bike. 
  • Pedaling is an alternating reciprocal coordination activity.  If  child can’t run, they are going to have a hard time riding a bike.  They need to have the coordination to  be able to do simple coordination jumps on the land before the child could be coordinated enough to pedal, steer, break and monitor his environment.

Read more about her Learning To Ride A Bike program here

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, C&FD Physical Therapy Services

Riding a bike with Amy Sturkey, physical therapist

Thursday, May 26, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Amy Sturkey LPT is an experienced and highly trained physical therapist at Child and Family Development in Charlotte. 

 

 

During Amy's 20+ year physical therapy career, she has helped kids, teens and young adults reach their potential with everything from learning to crawl, stand, walk, run, ride a bike, and much more.

This summer, her goal is to help young people get rolling! 

She shares, "I think people start too hard when they try to teach their child to ride a bike.  I often address the necessary skills separately before working on all the skills together."

 

  • A child needs to be able to steer pushing a shopping cart and a low riding toy when they are being pushed before he or she should be expected to steer and pedal a bike.  
  • Balance is important too. Typically a 5 year old can learn to ride a bike.  A 5-year-old can balance on either foot for 10 seconds with hands on hips.  Keep the training wheels if your child can’t balance 10 seconds well on each foot.   
  • Many children have trouble monitoring their environment.  I work a lot on the child practicing negotiating moving obstacle courses on their own 2 feet before expecting a child to do that on a bike. 
  • Pedaling is an alternating reciprocal coordination activity.  If  child can’t run, they are going to have a hard time riding a bike.  They need to have the coordination to  be able to do simple coordination jumps on the land before the child could be coordinated enough to pedal, steer, break and monitor his environment.

Read more about her Learning To Ride A Bike program here

Read More

Topics: Amy Sturkey, C&FD Physical Therapy Services

Karate-based physical therapy with Amy Sturkey LPT C/NDT

Tuesday, Feb 23, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Amy Sturkey LPT C/NDT is an experienced and highly trained physical therapist with more than 25 years of experience helping children, teens and young adults in Charlotte. For a limited time, she is offering KARATE-BASED PHYSICAL THERAPY at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development.  

OBJECTIVES: This group has been a historic favorite in the community and our practice! It is led by a Black Belt instructor and Amy.  Groups are formed according to skill level with age and size taken into consideration to ensure the best opportunity for success and homogeneity.  A participant must be able to follow directions and not display aggression towards self or others. Groups are limited to 2 participants at this time.  Karate-based physical therapy addresses difficulties in:

  • Attention
  • Balance
  • Coordination
  • Motor Planning
  • Sensory Processing
  • Strength
  • Timing

SCHEDULE: Groups meet weekly for up to 12 weeks, starting in February 2016. 

COST: Families may use available insurance benefits for some services or pay privately. 

CONTACT: asturkey@childandfamilydevelopment.com, 704-332-4834 ext. 114

Click here for a flyer about karate groups.  

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, C&FD Physical Therapy Services

Physical Therapist tips to help your little one stand

Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 by Child & Family Development

 

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, C&FD Physical Therapy Services

Baby using only one side of body? Here's a Physical Therapy list of concerns.

Tuesday, Dec 15, 2015 by Child & Family Development

  Is your baby only using one side of their body?

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, C&FD Physical Therapy Services

Physical therapist, Amy Sturkey endorses RDI strategies to help children

Friday, Dec 4, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Amy Sturkey LPT is a physical therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development. Recently, she reviewed a piece on RDI Connect™, an online resource about Relationship Development Intervention and related stories.  The post is titled When “No!” Means “I’m Scared or Overwhelmed!” and aptly describes what many parents (and physical therapists!) experience during encounters with children. 

The author, Sarah Wayland, offers several practical suggestions and some other insights.  Click here to read the full post.     

When a child is overwhelmed, try these strategies: 

  • Use empathy
  • Give him something to look forward to
  • Communicate nonverbally
  • Remove all demands

When a child is scared, try these strategies: 

  • Help the child know what to expect 
  • Anticipate the unexpected
  • Meditate
  • Identify thinking errors
  • Help the child label his emotions
  • Brainstorm coping strategies during calm times

The information prompted Amy to examine her own practice and interactions. She shares, "Sometimes we are not quick to empathize and think about the reasons behind a “no” that is verbal or nonverbal.  I think I may do better at this with a nonverbal child actually. With a child who is verbal, it is easy to think that the child is being oppositional or disrespectful but there are a whole myriad of reasons behind “no”.  

Amy incorporates RDI™ philosophies and other motivational approaches into her physical therapy sessions, especially when kids present with anxiety or fear.  Most times, giggles and performance prevail!   

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, C&FD Physical Therapy Services

Physical therapist approved holiday gifts for 1-year-old kids

Wednesday, Nov 25, 2015 by Child & Family Development

The holiday season is approaching! Are you trying to come up with some good gift ideas for kids? 

                     

Our physical therapy team made a list of motor milestones and related toys to consider for a 1-year-old child.

12-21 months old

Considerations/ Milestones Toys
  • begins pulling to stand
  • creeps
  • puts objects into and out of container
  • enjoys placing things on head
  • looks at and explores objects with hands
  • push toys
  • plastic nesting or stacking containers
  • cups
  • balls
  • blocks - small and brightly colored
  • baskets
  • boxes - simple ones to open and close

18-21 months old

Considerations/ Milestones Toys
  • needs interesting variety
  • likes to move and climb on things
  • constantly on the move; short attention span
  • more aware of people
  • begins to talk more readily
  • pull toys
  • pots and pans
  • sand toys
  • water toys
  • dolls
  • hammer toys
  • sturdy books with large colored pictures
  • stuffed toys
  • large blocks
  • toy telephone
  • large beads to string
  • simple shape sorter

Our team of 7 physical therapists always recommend home activities for clients to expedite progress.  Wondering about your little one's early development? 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Gail Fennimore

Developmental Reflexes in 1st Year: Protective Extension

Tuesday, Nov 24, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Amy Sturkey PT, physical therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, provides this summary of protective extension reflexes that begin to develop at in the 2nd half of the first year of life. These reflexes remain with the child even after the reflexes have been fully integrated.  

The table below describes what to do to elicit the reflex and what you should see your child do in response.

REFLEX

EMERGING AGE

WHAT TO DO

OUTCOME 

“Parachute” Protective Extension Reflex- Forward

5-6 months; remains with child

While holding the infant in a vertical (upright) position in space with your hands around the infant’s waist, plunge the child downward towards flat surface.

Results in the child extending his or her head, extending the arms and fingers outward as to protect the child from falling. The child blocks the fall by taking weight into his or her arms.

“Parachute” Protective Extension Reflex- Sideways

7-8 months; remains with child

While the child is sitting with legs out in front, push the child on his or her shoulder hard enough to cause the child to lose his balance.

Results in the child reaching out with his arm on the side opposite the push force with extension of the elbow, wrist, fingers to catch himself from falling to his side. The child blocks his fall by taking weight into his open palm and fingers.

“Parachute” Protective Extension Reflex- Backward

9-10 months; remains with child

While the child is sitting with her legs out in front, push the child backwards hard enough to cause the child to lose her balance over her base of support.

Results in the child extending her arms out backwards to protect herself from falling. The child blocks her fall by taking weight onto her extended arms.

Child & Family Development physical therapists are in-network with many insurance plans, including Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC, Cigna, Medcost, North Carolina Medicaid, Primary Physician Care, South Carolina Medicaid and United Health Care.  Our clients also may pay privately and access out-of-network benefits.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

 

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, C&FD Physical Therapy Services

Building Developmental Skills: Is your child struggling to walk up and down stairs?

Friday, Nov 20, 2015 by Child & Family Development


Amy Sturkey LPT is a physical therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development.  She regularly works with toddlers and their families to build gross motor developmental skills, such as walking up and down stairs.  Here are her suggestions for how and what to monitor and practice with your child.  Many parents of little ones tell out physical therapists that watching their toddler master stair climbing can be nerve wracking.

Amy's advice is:  Encourage your child to be curious and adventurous, but also ensure that they have proper strength and coordination to safely climb up and down stairs. What many parents may not realize is that, for a toddler, going up stairs is much easier than coming back down. Notice your toddler make their way up a staircase, but have no way to get themselves back down. Most toddlers will master walking up the stairs before they can walk back down.

General timeline that most children follow when it comes to stair climbing:

  • On average, by 9 to 12 months, children can crawl up stairs.
  • On average, by 18 months to 2 years, children can walk up and down steps two feet per step, while holding a rail or one hand.
  • On average, by 2 years to 2 years - 6 months, children can walk up stairs independently, two feet per step, without any support.
  • By 2 years - 7 months  to 3 years, children can walk up and down stairs, one foot per step, while holding a rail.
  • On average by 3 years, children can walk up and down stairs, one foot per step, with no support.

As a general rule, most children should be able to walk up and down stairs independently and alternating feet by the end of their third year.

Learning to climb stairs should be done under the close supervision of an adult. Provide close by assistance as your child climbs up or down stairs. Here are a few ways that you can help your child master stair climbing.

How to help:

  • When first learning to climb stairs, children are most supported when both hands are held by an adult. They will then progress to success with one hand held with the other hand holding a rail. Children can then move onto holding only a rail, followed by one hand placed on the wall, and eventually will walk up and down stairs with no support.
  • Often children want to keep both of their hands on the rail when they are learning stairs. If you want your child to practice with only one hand on the rail, give them a soft toy to hold in one hand so that only one hand is free to hold the rail.
  • Before attempting an entire staircase, practice going up or down the last one or two steps up or down the stairs first. When your child is comfortable walking up or down the last couple of stairs of a staircase, slowly start to add in more stairs.
  • When walking up or down stairs, children often arch backwards, relying too heavily on a nearby adult for support. Help them keep their head over their lead foot when walking up and down stairs.
  • If your child is practicing hands free stair walking, always stay close below your child as they climb up or descend stairs in case they lose their balance and fall.
  • To help your child walk up or down stairs while alternating feet, tap each leg as a physical cue and point to the next step.
  • As a general rule, children lead with their stronger leg when walking up stairs and lead with their weaker leg when walking down stairs.
  • If you notice that your child always prefers to lead with one particular leg, try placing a sticker on the shoe of the non preferred leg. When it is time to step, tell them it is time for “sticker foot” to take a step.

Need help?

If you want help with these suggestions or notice any of the above mentioned warning signs, a physical therapy evaluation can determine if your child is simply showing normal variability in gross motor development or if your child can benefit from intervention. 

  Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

References

Brown, Stephanie. "When can my child start walking up stairs?." About.com. N.p.. Web. 18 Feb 2013. <http://babyparenting.about.com/od/toddlermilestones/f/When-Can-My-Child-Start-Walking-Up-Stairs.htm>.

Robin, Suzanne. "Helping toddlers with walking up and down stairs." The Bump. Demand Media. Web. 18 Feb 2013. <http://preschooler.thebump.com/helping-toddlers-walking-up-down-stairs-2115.html>.

"Warning signs of a toddler's physical delay." Baby Center. N.p.. Web. 18 Feb 2013. <http://www.babycenter.com/0_warning-signs-of-a-toddlers-physical-delay_12287.bc>.

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, C&FD Physical Therapy Services

C&FD PTs are celebrating National Physical Therapy Month!

Friday, Oct 9, 2015 by Child & Family Development

 

Our team of 7 physical therapists is celebrating National Physical Therapy Month 2015!

MIDTOWN OFFICE  PINEVILLE OFFICE

Gail Fennimore PT PCS

Jill Pfund DPT

Amy Sturkey LPT 

Leslie Cordero DPT

Jessica Cornman DPT

Erin Harkins DPT ATRIC

Jessica Turchin MPT ATRIC

We provide services to children, teens and young adults with developmental, neurological and congenital impairments.  Services can be habilitative (learning a skill for the first time) or rehabilitative (becoming more proficient at a skill or relearning a skill).  We focus on improving and adapting a child's gross motor abilities.  

All of our therapists are licensed by the state of North Carolina. 

Child & Family Development physical therapists are in-network with many insurance plans, including Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC, Cigna, Medcost, North Carolina Medicaid, Primary Physician Care, South Carolina Medicaid and United Health Care.  Our clients also may pay privately and access out-of-network benefits.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

 

  

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, Jessica Turchin, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Erin Krueger, Gail Fennimore

PT, Amy Sturkey, celebrates 27 years AND a whole lot more

Monday, Aug 10, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Amy Sturkey LPT marks 27 years at Child and Family Development this month! She is a physical therapist at the Midtown office.    

We are so very proud of her clinical work here, but are even more excited now about her latest professional achievement.  For many years, she has been developing a pediatric exercise application to provide easy access to exercises to people all over the world.

The app is: Pediatric Physical Therapy Strengthening Exercises for Abdominals

Find it in the iTunes store:  https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/pediatric-physical-therapy/id973247310?mt=8

Watch the release video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O-aEhwlLCP0

Future plans are in the works to release the app in the Google Play store for use with Android devices. 

Happy C&FD Anniversary and Congratulations!

Read more about Amy's physical therapy APP-complishments here.  

Want to learn more about our team? 

Sign up for C&FD News

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, C&FD Physical Therapy Services

Physical therapy helped my child with Down syndrome learn to ride a bike

Monday, Jun 22, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Amy Sturkey LPT is an experienced and highly trained physical therapist at Child and Family Development in Charlotte. 

She is expanding the "Learning To Ride A Bike" program now.   

 

 

One family shares this experience:

Our child has Down syndrome, with corresponding low muscle tone.  We never thought it would be possible for him to ride a bike. 

Amy got him started on an adapted bike.   It gave him confidence and got him outdoors.  Also, it was good exercise and fun! 

Now he is able to ride a regular bike.

Read another testimonial about the Learning To Ride A Bike program here

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Testimonials

Physical therapy helped my child with autism learn to ride a bike

Thursday, Jun 11, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Amy Sturkey LPT is an experienced and highly trained physical therapist at Child and Family Development in Charlotte. 

She is expanding the "Learning To Ride A Bike" program now.   

 

 

One family shares this experience:

My daughter has autism.  Although she has mastered pedaling the adaptive bike, we have not been able to get her to steer or even care to. 

Amy developed an innovative approach to help her with this issue. After working with Amy, she is now grasping the idea of steering, paying attention to what is ahead of her and turning away from it.  She no longer is looking down at the ground while riding.  Now, she looks ahead and does not run into the grass.

We are looking forward to the day she can ride her bike down the street and back without someone hanging on to her!  

Read more about her Learning To Ride A Bike program here

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Testimonials

Ride a bike with Amy Sturkey, physical therapist

Wednesday, Jun 3, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Amy Sturkey LPT is an experienced and highly trained physical therapist at Child and Family Development in Charlotte. 

 

During Amy's 20+ year physical therapy career, she has helped kids, teens and young adults reach their potential with everything from learning to crawl, stand, walk, run, ride a bike, and much more.

This summer, her goal is to help young people get rolling! 

She shares, "I think people start too hard when they try to teach their child to ride a bike.  I often address the necessary skills separately before working on all the skills together."

  • A child needs to be able to steer pushing a shopping cart and a low riding toy when they are being pushed before he or she should be expected to steer and pedal a bike.  
  • Balance is important too. Typically a 5 year old can learn to ride a bike.  A 5-year-old can balance on either foot for 10 seconds with hands on hips.  Keep the training wheels if your child can’t balance 10 seconds well on each foot.   
  • Many children have trouble monitoring their environment.  I work a lot on the child practicing negotiating moving obstacle courses on their own 2 feet before expecting a child to do that on a bike. 
  • Pedaling is an alternating reciprocal coordination activity.  If  child can’t run, they are going to have a hard time riding a bike.  They need to have the coordination to  be able to do simple coordination jumps on the land before the child could be coordinated enough to pedal, steer, break and monitor his environment.

Read more about her Learning To Ride A Bike program here

Read More

Topics: Amy Sturkey

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Child & Family Development is a multi-disciplinary pediatric clinic serving the needs of Charlotte area children and their families.

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  • 4012 Park Road, Suite 200
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.332.4834
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  • 10516 Park Road
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.541.9080

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