Holiday Help: online gift guide to sensory vendors 

Tuesday, Dec 13, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Abbey Wash MOT OTR/L is an occupational therapist at Child and Family Development- Midtown.  This month, she discovered a gift guide from a reliable source, the STAR Institute in Denver, Colorado. 

The list includes vendors-- as well as associated products and coupon codes-- that support people with sensory processing difficulties and various disabilities.

Some highlights include:

  • Chewigum
  • Flaghouse
  • My Feelings
  • SensaCalm
  • TumblTrak

Click here to view the full guide.

Click below to find more new C&FD posts throughout December by searching HOLIDAY.

READ  OUR  BLOG    

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Topics: Abbey Wash, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Don't Take Our Word For It! no occupational therapy recommended

Tuesday, Nov 1, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Abbey Wash MOT OTR/L is an occupational therapist at Child and Family Development- Midtown office. 

A recent client survey provided this praise: "Abbey Wash as a pleasure.  Fortunately, we did not need occupational therapy, but she was wonderful during the evaluation.”

Read more about Abbey's approach to pediatric therapy here.      

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist   

 

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Topics: Abbey Wash, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Testimonials

Charlotte Observer story of perseverance that includes C&FD occupational therapist & physical therapist

Monday, Oct 24, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

Child and Family Development is so proud to be part of this story of perseverance!

Please read the piece by Scott Fowler in Charlotte Observer October 23 edition: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/sports/spt-columns-blogs/scott-fowler/article109620807.html

Two of our pediatric therapists were included and the author did a beautiful job capturing the joy of small successes of therapy sessions:

  Read more about C&FD in the news here.

SEEN & HEARD

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Abbey Wash, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Testimonials

Abbey Wash, occupational therapist, celebrates 7 years at C&FD

Wednesday, Oct 12, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Abbey Wash 

Abbey Wash MOT OTR/L is an occupational therapist at the Midtown office. She is celebrating years at Child and Family Development this month.   

Abbey is passionately committed to finding evidenced-based and practical solutions for children with both neurological and physical difficulties.  She has extensive experience working with children with varied diagnoses including but not limited to: ADHD, arthrogryposis, autism spectrum disorder, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, dyspraxia, fetal alcohol syndrome, fine motor delays, mitochondrial disease, sensory processing disorder, stroke and visual motor deficits.  Her specialized trainings include Sequential Oral Sensory™ (SOS) Approach to Feeding and Neurodevelopmental Treatment™ (NDT) techniques.  

A colleague shares:  

She shows dedication to our field and to her colleagues. Abbey is always available for problem-solving and to lend a helping hand.

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Topics: Abbey Wash, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Allergan Pediatric Spasticity Study w/ Mecklenburg Neurological Associates

Monday, Jun 6, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 OSC_Access.jpg

Child and Family Development is proud to participate in an Allergan Pediatric Spasticity Study with On Site Clinical Research and Dr. Robert Nahouraii of Mecklenburg Neurological Associates.

3 C&FD therapists are credentialed for this study: 

Please consider being part of this important medical research study evaluating BOTOX for the treatment of upper limb and lower limb spasticity in children between the ages of 2-17 years.

For more information about criterion and benefits, contact On Site Clinical: Michala Michaux, 704-619-5834, mmichaux@onsiteclinical.com

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Topics: Marion Wilm, Abbey Wash, Gail Fennimore

What is Occupational Therapy?

Monday, Apr 18, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

 

Occupational therapy is all about the "job of living". 

The primary role of the occupational therapist in pediatrics is to help children play, grow, and develop many of the skills that will enable them to enjoy a satisfying adult life.  OTs do this through the knowledgeable selection and use of everyday activities (occupations) to evaluate and enhance children’s development and competence.  

We help children, teens and young adults with behavioral, developmental, neurological and physical deficits gain skills and learn to function with as much independence as possible.  Therapy visits might focus on helping kids learn to eat, hold a pencil, write letters and words, cut a straight line, get dressed, brush teeth, stay organized and focused in the classroom or on the playground, manage sensory input and their own behaviors, as well as stretch and strengthen their muscles.  In other words, we help children with everyday activities.  

If you notice difficulties in one or more of these areas, an evaluation and treatment may be appropriate:

  • Behavior
  • Developmental Skill Acquisition 
  • Delayed motor or self-care skills
  • Feeding 
  • Motor Planning
  • Motor 
  • Sensory Processing
  • Visual Perception 

Some of our occupational therapy specialty services are:

Click here for more information on the Child and Family Development occupational therapists at our Charlotte and Pineville offices!

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Marion Wilm, Jessica Hoffarth, Melissa Petcu, Abbey Wash, Kati Berlin, Megan Bevington, Courtney Stanley, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, Kim Toomer, Meghan Davidson-Palmer

April is Occupational Therapy Month!

Friday, Apr 1, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 



April is Occupational Therapy Month and we are celebrating with our team.  Visit our Charlotte and Pineville lobbies to add a note of THANKS for the wonderful work they do! 

MIDTOWN

  • Abbey Wash MOT OTR/L
  • Jessica Hoffarth MS OTR/L
  • Megan Bevington MS OTR/L
  • Meghan Dooley MS OTR/L
  • Melissa Petcu MS OTR/L

 

PINEVILLE

  • Courtney Stanley MS OTR/L
  • Kati Berlin MS OTR/L
  • Katie Haywood MS OTR/L
  • Kim Toomer MOT OTR/L
  • Marion Wilm OTR/L C/NDT

 

Click here for more information on the occupational therapists at Child and Family Development!

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist


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Topics: Marion Wilm, Jessica Hoffarth, Melissa Petcu, Abbey Wash, Kati Berlin, Megan Bevington, Courtney Stanley, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, Kim Toomer, Meghan Davidson-Palmer

Occupational Therapist approved: holiday gift idea

Wednesday, Dec 2, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Abbey Wash MOT, OTR/L, occupational therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, is getting ready for the holiday season now.  Here's a list of some of her favorite fine motor activities, mostly with a very low price tag!     

  • Play with play dough: "Play-dough Fun Factory” 
  • Lacing activities: lace a shoe, make a bracelet, or string cereal for a necklace
  • Tearing paper to make pictures: instead of coloring a picture, tear small pieces of colored paper and glue them on
  • Watering mom or dad’s garden with a spray bottle
  • Play with sidewalk chalk, then use a spray bottle as your eraser
  • Building with Legos, Bristle Blocks, or standard blocks
  • Cooking activities: knead bread, use a rolling pin, cut with cookie cutters, mix the dough
  • Painting: use your fingers or a brush. For increased support, write on a vertical surface. (Writing on a vertical surface provides more support for the upper extremity.)
  • Laundry: hanging clothes on hangers is great fine motor and coordination practice
  • Board games with tweezers: 
      • Toy Story 3 Alien Rescue Claw Game By Mattel
      • Beware of Dog by University Games
      • Bed Bugs by Patch
      • Operation by Milton Bradley
      • Wok and Roll by iPlay
  • Tennis ball mouth: instructions on how to make and play with one can be found here 

Read about gifts related to occupational therapy work here.  

Our team consists of 9 licensed occupational therapists, rather than assistants or aides.  We are in-network with many insurance plans, including Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield NC, Cigna, Medcost, North Carolina Medicaid, Primary Physician Care and United Health Care.  Our clients also may pay privately and access out-of-network benefits.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Abbey Wash, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

C&FD celebrates 6 years with Abbey Wash, occupational therapist

Tuesday, Oct 20, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Abbey Wash MOT OTR/L marks 6 years of tenure this month! She is an occupational therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development.

Abbey shares what she enjoys most about her work, the children, "I am constantly inspired by the hearts and attitudes of my clients and families.  Their resiliency, persistence and creativity is what keeps me going!"

Read more about Abbey's expertise here

Happy C&FD Anniversary!

Want to learn more about out team? 

Click here to sign up for  C&FD NEWS

 

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Topics: Abbey Wash, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Occupational Therapy: Hate to wait? Try this easy idea for kids.

Tuesday, Aug 4, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Abbey Wash, MOT, OTR/L, an occupational therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, recently reviewed an article.  This post by Stephanie Yamkovenko on OT Connections via American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) shares ideas for managing children's challenging behaviors with activities and tools.  

Abbey follows the AOTA’s one-minute update emails regularly and some information in this one got her attention, particularly the coaster game to play while waiting in a restaurant.  So easy and genius!

The activity involves gathering 3 or more coasters, marking one with a label like a smiley face, and moving them about.  Then, a child guesses where the smiley face coaster is.  Parents can incorporate concepts like earning reward of leading the game, turn taking and keeping score too.    

Click here to watch a video demonstration of the activity. 

Our 10 occupational therapists are licensed by the state of North Carolina.  We do not employ assistants or aides. We are in-network with many insurance plans, including Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield NC, Cigna, Medcost, North Carolina Medicaid, Primary Physician Care, South Carolina Medicaid and United Health Care. Clients also may pay privately and access out-of-network benefits.

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Topics: Abbey Wash, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Sensory Processing tips for Easter

Thursday, Apr 2, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Abbey Wash, MOT, OTR/L, occupational therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, found a great resource from the Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) Foundation (www.spdfoundation.net) to help manage difficulties during Easter. 

They suggest:

 

 

  • Changes in routine can cause stress.  When there is a holiday and the normal daily routine is different, kids with SPD can have a difficult time.  
    • If you are attending church services, consider noise canceling headphones and a sensory backpack containing items most beneficial for your child's needs. It could be items that are soft and squishy or smooth or familiar.  
    • If going to a family event, let the child know ahead of time, bring a sensory backpack, and even look at pictures of who may be there.
  • Set specific limits with games in open spaces like Easter egg hunts or let the child opt out.
  • Choose comfortable clothing. 

 

Read more about how occupational therapy helps kids with sensory processing difficulties here

 

 

 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist


 


 

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Topics: Abbey Wash

What should a 6-month-old be eating?

Tuesday, Jan 6, 2015 by Child & Family Development

A good time to start introducing solids for your baby is around 6 months of age. However, keep in mind that breast milk and/or formula is the main source of nutrition for your child until they turn 1-year-old. So,  this time is for exploration, experimentation, and learning for you and baby.  They will make a mess, which is a great sensory experience for them so be ready for a clean up!

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Topics: Allison Parker, Abbey Wash, Megan Bevington, Courtney Stanley, Ann Guild

Occupational Therapist follows AOTA potty training tips

Sunday, Dec 21, 2014 by Child & Family Development

Abbey Wash, occupational therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, follows news from the American Occupational Therapy Association.  

Recently, she discovered an updated tip sheet on potty training that she uses in occupational therapy and shares with parents.  

Abbey notes that potty training can be a great source of stress for families.  Our communities and schools put a lot of pressure on success!  Keep in mind that most children don’t consistently master bladder control until 4.5-5 years.  Bowel control comes a little earlier at 3.5-4  years.  Before attempting to toilet train, you’ll need to first make sure that your child is showing signs of readiness and then prepare for a training routine.  A half-hearted failed attempt can actually hinder success!  

The tip sheet includes:

Identify signs when the child is ready to begin participating in a toileting routine.  Children will often demonstrate signs when they are ready to be toilet trained. These signs include:

  • Interest in the bathroom or in the toileting process, which includes wanting to visit the bathroom, playing pretend toileting, touching toilet paper, or being curious about how the toilet flushes
  • Wanting to observe others using the bathroom
  • Reporting to a caregiver when they have gone in a diaper and/or asking to wear underwear
  • Starting to “hold” their urine or bowel movement and/or getting upset when a diaper is soiled

It is important that families begin toilet training when it works for them and the child, typically between 18 months and 3 years of age. Toilet training is a family commitment, so all members should collaborate for success.

Set up a successful routine for potty time.  An important aspect of toileting is for children to learn their body and the cues it is giving them to know when to go to the bathroom. But families should also encourage toileting routines, including the following times during the day for bathroom visits:

  • When waking up
  • Before and after naptime
  • Before and after a new play activity
  • Before a meal
  • Before bedtime
  • Before leaving the house for an event

Consistently taking a child to the bathroom at established times helps identify a routine for the family and child. If a child is showing signs of needing to go to the bathroom by wiggling or grabbing his or her clothes, families can ask if it’s time to visit the bathroom. But it is also important to teach children to recognize their body signals and go on their own.

Increase independence in toileting skills. Part of successful toileting is to ensure children wear clothes that can be easily removed. This often means clothing with elastic waistbands. If a child has a difficult time grasping the waistband, families may attach a loop the child can pull on.  
Provide a comfortable and inviting environment.  The bathroom can be a scary place with lots of noises, sensations, and smells. Some strategies for setting up a good toileting routine include making the space accessible and inviting, including:
  • Placing items needed for toileting, such as toilet paper, within easy reach, and having a sturdy stool nearby to help the child get onto the toilet.
  • Allowing the child to do an activity while on the toilet, like reading a favorite book.
  • Talking to the child about the bathroom and how the toilet works to avoid fear.
  • Placing brightly colored towels and fun-smelling soaps at the sink to make hand washing fun.
  • Addressing smells with air fresheners as appropriate.
  • Adapting the toilet seat so the child feels secure. For example, consider using a potty chair, potty ring, or foot rest.

Offer steps to help your family learn a positive routine.  Learning to toilet may take time, and it is important not to rush a child. Children may need to sit for a bit to be successful. They may benefit from:

  • Running the sink water to initiate pottying
  • Singing a song or two to relax
  • Looking at a book while on the toilet

If a child cannot remember all the steps in the process of toileting, a series of pictures of each step posted by the toilet may help. Remember, children need to practice, and toileting has a lot of steps! Bathrooms are also different, so a child may need additional time when in a new bathroom.

Help your child learn proper hygiene.  Some children may need assistance getting clean after toileting. They may need coaching on how much toilet paper to use, and visual checks to ensure that they are clean. Hand washing is important, and children should be able to access the sink with a sturdy stool. Soap and towels should be easy to reach. In order to protect children from water burns, families can label the faucets with colors to indicate which is cold and which is hot.   

Encourage positive behavior.  Toileting accidents are a part of the learning process and to be expected. Children may be so interested in something else that they forget about getting to the bathroom until it’s too late. A child should never be punished for an accident. Instead, praise a child when successful and clean up accidents calmly. If necessary, carry extra clothes so children won’t be embarrassed if they have an accident. Consider plastic sheets on the bed as a temporary measure and reduce fluids before bedtime. Children can also help clean up the mess, which may help them learn to avoid future accidents.  Reward children for their responsibility and participation as they learn toileting skills by complimenting their “big boy” or “big girl” underpants, and by praising their successes in keeping their bed and clothes dry. 

Click here for the AOTA article.  

If a struggle persists, consult your pediatrician.  There may be a medical issue hindering success.  If no medical issue is found, contact an occupational therapist.  We can address things like sensory awareness, dressing independence, and core strength to improve the process.  

Abbey and the other pediatric occupational therapists are available.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

Learn more about developmental milestones on our website. 

 

 

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Topics: Abbey Wash

Holiday tips for kids with sensory processing difficulties

Friday, Dec 19, 2014 by Child & Family Development

Kati Berlin and Abbey Wash, occupational therapists at both offices of Child and Family Development recommend these tips from the STAR Center.  

Holiday celebrations bring joy, and sometimes challenges.  Excited children become noisier, decorations provide greater visual input and the lack of routine make some children more anxious and reactive. For children with sensory processing issues, the daily challenges of communication and social skills can be magnified.  

Here are some suggestions to support communication and emotion regulation for successful social interactions:

  • When changes in the school routine occur, it is important to compensate by providing greater predictability and structure at home.
  • Make a holiday calendar. Create a list or insert pictures of planned activities that are outside the regular routine.
  • Help your child learn basic phrases to use when meeting relatives that he or she hasn't seen for a while.
  • Provide a break for your child by watching a DVD or quiet time when days are full and busy.
  • Help your child stay regulated by watching for signs of sensory overload or emotion dis-regulation and help your child regain control before it is too late.

Read another blog post for more ideas to help kids at this time of year. 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

Happy Holidays! 

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Topics: Abbey Wash, Kati Berlin

How Does Your Engine Run?- Just Right Speed

Monday, Dec 15, 2014 by Child & Family Development


 

The Williams and Shellenberger Engine Program describes 3 different engine speeds: High, Just Right and Low.

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Topics: Abbey Wash

How Does My Engine Run?- The Alert Program

Thursday, Nov 20, 2014 by Child & Family Development

An occupational therapist often refers to a child’s activity level like a car engine. Each child’s engine runs differently and can change arousal speeds throughout the day. These changes can be a result of what is going on during their lives or the activities they partake in each day.

The Williams and Shellenberger Engine Program describes 3 different engine speeds: High, “Just Right” and Low. The way a child modulates, or takes in and regulates the multiple inputs and stimuli, has a huge impact on his or her engine level.

 

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Topics: Abbey Wash

Child & Family Development celebrates with Abbey Wash

Friday, Oct 17, 2014 by Child & Family Development

Abbey Wash marks 5 years this month! She is an occupational therapist at the Midtown office.  

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Topics: Abbey Wash

The Occupational Therapy team wishes you a "Happy Backpack Awareness Day"

Wednesday, Sep 17, 2014 by Child & Family Development

Abbey Wash OTR/L, a pediatric occupational therapist at our Midtown office in Charlotte, and the rest of the OCcupational Therapy team at Child and Family Development celebrate "Backpack Awareness Day" today. 

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Topics: Abbey Wash

Don't Take Our Word For It!

Wednesday, May 28, 2014 by Child & Family Development

Occupational Therapist, Abbey Wash, and Speech Therapist, Melinda Bumgardner are getting rave reviews from clients!

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Topics: Abbey Wash, Melinda Schatz

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Child & Family Development is a multi-disciplinary pediatric clinic serving the needs of Charlotte area children and their families.

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  • 4012 Park Road, Suite 200
  • Charlotte, NC
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  • 704.541.9080

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