Child & Family Development

Recent Posts

Occupational therapist, Meghan Davidson-Palmer, celebrates 1 year at C&FD

Wednesday, Feb 22, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Meghan Davidson-Palmer!

Meghan Davidson-Palmer MS OTR/L is an occupational therapist at Child and Family Development- Midtown.  This month, she celebrates 1 year!  

She shares these sentiments:

"In all seriousness, one of the main reasons I became an OT is so I could help people achieve more independence and lead more fulfilling lives. It's so exciting to watch kids achieve something they've been working so hard for.

In all silliness, it's nice to have a job where it's okay to do arts and crafts at work!" 

We like the balance!

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Topics: C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, Meghan Davidson-Palmer

Looking for therapy services near Dilworth or Myers Park?

Tuesday, Feb 21, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Looking for therapy for children, adolescents and young adults near the "center city" of Charlotte? 

Child and Family Development- Midtown office is centrally located:  

  • across the street from Park Road Shopping Center
  • about 3 miles from South Park Mall 
  • about 4 miles from Uptown

Our offices are inviting places. The 7000 SQ Midtown space is casual and family-friendly. We want you to feel welcome and comfortable. The lobby is cozy.  The therapy rooms are private and fun.  We’ve found the balance of a professional office and an enjoyable place for all!

 Our multidisciplinary clinic has been helping children and families since 1980. The team of experienced therapists can assess and treat a wide range of childhood concerns, including autism, ADHD, dyslexia and other learning disabilities or special needs.  Multidisciplinary services include:

The Contact Us tab on our website will link you to our address and a map. 

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Topics: C&FD Office Locations

Physical Therapy: Taking Care of Animals Around-The-House with Katie Eggleston DPT

Monday, Feb 20, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston DPT, physical therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, emphasizes that we can improve our health and build motor skills not just in a physical therapy session or gym, but in everyday events and activities already happening around the house. In February, Katie suggests getting kids involved in taking care of pets…supervised of course!

  • As the weather warms up, walking the dog is a great way to sneak in some exercise working on leg strength and cardio-respiratory endurance.
  • Stand on tiptoes or climb a small step stool to feed animals in cages or tanks to build leg strength and balance.
  • For kids of an appropriate age, work on leg strength with squatting  to help scoop cat litter or fill food dishes.
  • Playing catch/fetch outdoors with the family dog: parent throws ball to child to catch who then throws for the dog to chase. This can greatly improve hand eye coordination as well as bilateral coordination for throwing with alternate arm/leg.

As an added bonus, kids will learn about care-taking and responsibility, the bond with animals will deepen, and the parent gets a little chore relief!

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

Don't Take Our Word For It! Physical therapy and more.

Friday, Feb 17, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Gail Fennimore PT PCS C/NDT works at Child and Family Development- Midtown and knows that sometimes the job includes more than physical therapy expertise. 

A recent client survey included this comment: "Gail has been wonderful to work with our insurance company.  She has gone above and beyond with trying to get coverage for our son!”

Read more about our physical therapists here.          

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Gail Fennimore, C&FD Testimonials

Speech therapist, Melinda Schatz, celebrates 6 years at C&FD

Thursday, Feb 16, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Melinda Schatz!

Melinda Schatz, MA CCC-SLP is a speech therapist therapist at Child and Family Development- Midtown.  This month, she celebrates 6 years!   

She shares her secret professional joy:

"Working with children gives me a reason to play with all the cool new games and toys!"

Have fun!

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Topics: Melinda Schatz, C&FD Speech Therapy Services

Stuttering or Developmental Dysfluency? Info from our speech therapists

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2017 by Child & Family Development

WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN DYSFLUENCY AND STUTTERING?

As much as 80% of children have dysfluent speech during early childhood. It is not uncommon for kids to go back and forth between periods of fluency and dysfluency, especially when excited, tired or rushed. Usually, this is developmental dysfluency and will often disappear as a child masters articulation and communication skills.

For others, dysfluency will remain or will return in a more severe and long-lasting pattern called stuttering. This occurs when the natural flow of speech is interrupted. Usually, stuttering begins between the ages of 2-5, with a gradual onset. Although the exact cause is unknown, it is often genetic and a result of difficulty in coordinating the speech muscles in the presence of certain external demands. Risks and symptoms include:

  • Prolonging sounds
  • Inability to make certain sounds
  • Difficulty repeating sounds

FACTS ABOUT STUTTERING:

  • Affects about 1% of the world’s population
  • 4 times more common among boys than girls
  • Stuttering usually begins in childhood
  • Stuttering behaviors develop and vary throughout the lifespan
  • Many people report significant variability–sometimes stuttering a lot, sometimes a little
  • Stuttering can feel like out-of-control speech that is intermittent and unpredictable. This can cause embarrassment, anxiety and fear.

HOW TO HELP A CHILD WHO STUTTERS:

  • Don’t show a child if you are upset about his/her speech.
  • Look at a child when he/she is speaking and show by your expressions that you are interested in what he/she is saying.
  • Don’t supply words or interrupt. Let a child get his/her words out independently.
  • Don’t force a child to hurry by suggesting they talk faster or get to the point.
  • Don’t ask a child to stop and start over when he/she stutters.
  • Notice and minimize times of emotional tension when stuttering may be more severe.
  • Model a relaxed manner of speech. Remain calm, unhurried and reassuring.
  • Talk openly about stuttering if he/she expresses a desire to do so, but do not make a big issue about it.

HAVE A CONCERN?

  • Seek a qualified and experienced speech-language pathologist with expertise in this area.
  • Seek help as early as possible to educate both you and the child in the therapeutic early interventions that are most effective.
  • Under public law, stuttering is considered a disorder for which public schools are required to provide competent assistance to a child.

Click here to read more about speech therapy services at Child and Family Development. 

Click here for a printable page about stuttering and dysfluency.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist  

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services

Occupational Therapy: Out & About at the grocery store with Melissa Petcu OTR/L

Monday, Feb 13, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Melissa Petcu MS OTR/L, occupational therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, emphasizes that pediatric occupational therapy is all about "the job of living". Families can capitalize of events and activities already happening when they are out and about in the community to facilitate development and improve skills. In February, she shares:

Think it would be nice to have a helper at the grocery store? Give your child a “job” and watch their attitude change! Your child will enjoy pushing the cart with you (even a smaller one).  Kids will feel proud when they are picking out the items and placing them in the cart. I find that there are less melt downs and negotiations when the focus is on their grocery list, pushing the cart and locating the items.  Maybe the reward is one extra item of their choosing!

When you think about it, a market is a multi-sensory location with lots of opportunity for motor, strength and language activities.  It sounds a lot like the multidisciplinary approach here at C&FD!

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Melissa Petcu, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Spring/ Summer Psychology Social Skills Program at C&FD

Friday, Feb 10, 2017 by Child & Family Development

The next Child and Family DevelopmentSOCIAL SKILLS PROGRAM begins in April 2017. 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

Curriculum-based materials will be utilized to improve social, emotional, and self-regulatory strategies and skills.  Meetings will include a short lesson and opportunities for practice (e.g., role-playing, activities and games).   Acquisition of skills can lead to reduced stress and anxiety, improved school performance, healthier peer relationships, and better management of emotions and reactions. Parent handouts will be provided regularly that review content and offers suggestions for working on that week’s skill at home. Focus will be on skills including conversational skills, choosing appropriate friends, appropriate use of humor, being flexible, having get-togethers, being a good sport, responding to teasing/ bullying and handling disagreements.

Three psychology team members led this program:

  • Trisha Dyer, LPC/A
  • Gretchen Hunter, PhD
  • Ashley Kies, PhD LPA NCSP

Click here for printable info page.

OFFERINGS

MIDTOWN OFFICE     Dates: Tuesday 4/18, 4/25, 5/2, 5/9, 5/16, 5/23, 5/30, 6/6, 6/13, 6/20

  • Boys (8-9), 4:15-5
  • Girls (10-12), 5:15-6

PINEVILLE OFFICE     Dates: Thursday 4/20, 4/27, 5/4, 5/11, 5/18, 5/25, 6/1, 6/8, 6/15, 6/22

  • Boys (8-9), 4:15-5
  • Boys (10-12), 4:30-5:15
  • Boys (13-15), 5:15-6
  • Girls (7-9), 5:15-6

All weekly meetings are approximately 45 minutes and meet weekly for 10 weeks per session.

Additional programs, including for other ages and other difficulties, may be offered as interest exists.

COST

Programs are offered in 10 session bundles. Full payment of $500.00 is required at the time of enrollment.  These sessions are not billable to insurance and are non-refundable.

Unexpected provider-canceled sessions will be rescheduled to a designated make-up date and offered at no additional cost.

To ensure optimal placement, a diagnostic interview is required before enrolling to review presenting concerns and medical history. This service may be billable to insurance.  Most of our psychologists are in-network with Aetna and BCBS.  

Weekly attendance is strongly encouraged to build continuity of skills. Attendees make more progress with consistent attendance to review and practice skills.

CONTACT

Gretchen Hunter, PhD, 704-940-0626, ghunter@childandfamilydevelopment.com

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Topics: Gretchen Hunter, C&FD Psychological Services, Ashley Kies, Trisha Dyer

Speech therapists share tips to encourage speech and language development

Thursday, Feb 9, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 

The Child and Family Development speech therapy team loves to work with little ones with emerging expressive and receptive language skills.  

Often, parents ask what they can do at home to help kids stay on track with development.    

Here are some ideas.  Choose and adapt the ones that are most appropriate for your child.

 

  • When your child initiates conversation, give him your full attention.
  • Use good speech that is clear and simple for your child to imitate.
  • Pause after speaking, giving the child time to respond and continue the conversation.
  • Repeat what your child says to indicate that you understand.  Build and expand on what he says. For example, your child says "Want juice" and you respond by saying "You want apple juice."
  • Make a scrapbook of favorite or familiar things by cutting out pictures or using photographs.  Group them into categories such as: things to ride, things to eat, things to eat as dessert, etc.  Create silly pictures by mixing and matching pictures.  For example, glue a picture of a dog behind the wheel of a car.  Talk about what is wrong with the picture and ways to "fix" it.  Count items pictured in a book.
  • Help your child understand and ask questions.  Play the yes/no game.  Ask questions like "Are you a boy?", "Are you Billy?" or "Can a cat fly?".  Encourage your child to make up questions for you. 
  • Ask questions that require a choice.  "Do you want an apple or a banana?" or "Will you wear the green shirt or the blue shirt today?".  Make sure to provide choices that are both acceptable so their choice can be realized.
  • Expand vocabulary.  For example, name body parts and identify what you do with them.  "This is my nose.  I can smell cookies.  I can smell flowers." You can expand this activity by asking "What do you smell with your nose?" Place familiar objects in a container.  Have the child remove an object, tell you what it is and how to use it.  "This is my ball.  I play with it and it bounces."  Encourage turn taking and modeling the response by doing the same.
  • Use photographs of familiar people and objects to retell what happened or make up a new story about the picture.  "I went to the park with my brother.  We played on the slide and the swing."
  • Continue to build vocabulary by introducing new words as you see a novel item/concept.  Examples might include something on television, in a book or in the community (park, church, store).
  • Use sequence words (first, last, next) as well as location words (under, beside, near) and opposites (up/down, in/out).
  • Offer a description/clue of an object and ask the child to identify it.  For example, "We sleep in it" (a bed), "It is used to clean the floor." (a broom).
  • Help your child follow 2 or 3-step directions such as "Go to your room and bring me a book."
  • Encourage your child to give directions.  For example, you follow his directions, such as what to put on his toast or how to build a Lego tower. 

You don't need more or special time to practice speech and language.  Incorporate these activities into what is happening already- all day, everyday. 

  • Name objects, utensils and foods as you prepare meals in the kitchen.
  • Name the room you are in and what you are doing there. For example, "The bathroom has a sink, a tub and a toilet.  It's time to take a bath.  We need soap and a towel. You are out of the tub.  It is time to get in."

  Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

Read more about our speech therapy services here.  

Visit the Resources tab on our website to access helpful developmental charts. 

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services

Client Services Coordinator, Candice Fletcher, celebrates 1 year at C&FD

Wednesday, Feb 8, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Candice Fletcher!

Candice is a Client Services Coordinator at Child and Family Development and works primarily at the Midtown office.  This month, she celebrates 1 year.   

She shares "I never knew I would own so many green clothes.  I've got to be ready for the bimonthly GREEN DAYs and all of the other fun celebrations in the office!"

Nice shoes!

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Occupational therapist, Jessica Hoffarth learns about RMTi

Tuesday, Feb 7, 2017 by Child & Family Development

The happy baby roll, maybe you've heard of it in yoga class or watched your own little one enjoy this curled up body position.  There is science behind this joy!

Jessica Hoffarth MS OTR/L, occupational therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, and some other C&FD pediatric therapists are learning all about it in their continuing education work with Rhythmic Movement Training International (RMTi)RMTI is a movement based, primitive (infant or neo-natal) reflex integration program that uses developmental movements, gentle isometric pressure and self-awareness to rebuild the foundations necessary to help overcome learning, sensory, emotional and behavioral challenges for children and adults. 

RMTi is based on the work of Kerstin Linde, a Swedish movement training specialist, who developed movements based on her observations of how infants are meant to move.  The movements are based on replicating the movements that infants naturally make.

Watch this video of a school aged child doing the happy baby roll here

Jessica is eager to continue her training and incorporate these techniques into occupational therapy sessions.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Jessica Hoffarth, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services

Physical Therapy safety checklist: navigating streets and parking lots

Monday, Feb 6, 2017 by Child & Family Development

The Child and Family Development physical therapy team helps kids and teens learn safe navigation in their community.

This can include stairs, exits/entrances, outdoor terrain and even street cross-sections.

Physical therapists sometimes use this safety checklist to assess skill level and identify hazards.

 

Does this child do the following?:

  • Choose an appropriate route or accessible access as needed including beginning and end location to cross the road/parking lot

  • Stop appropriately on a sidewalk, the edge of a road, edge of parked cars to view traffic

  • Acknowledge and obey cross walk indicators when present

  • Looks left and right before proceeding

  • Listen or answer appropriate questions regarding sound   (i.e . notices sounds of nearby engines, backing sounds, etc)

  • Notice visual indications of cars backing up as appropriate (such as reverse lights)

  • Hold an adult's hand if decision making skills are under an age equivalency of 10 years OR walk beside others if older than 10 years in decision making

  • Choose an appropriate initial pace crossing

  • Modify pace appropriately when crossing as determined by oncoming cars

  • Continue to look left and right while crossing

  • Understand Walk and Don’t Walk Symbols at crosswalks

  • Know and press appropriate button (when available) to trigger Walk Symbol at crosswalk 

  • Continue to monitor crosswalk indicator for changes

  • Walks when the symbol changes to Walk

Read more about physical therapy services here.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services

How to Get the Most Out Of Therapy- Insurance and Financial Management

Friday, Feb 3, 2017 by Child & Family Development

This is the third of three HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OUT OF THERAPY AT CHILD AND FAMILY DEVELOPMENT posts. This post is about: Insurance and Financial Management

Getting started or managing a change:

  • Understand insurance benefits via discussions with us and your funding source.
  • Understand all insurance and other health care options that your employer may be offer and compare what is available. Compare plans when possible.      
  • Anticipate your out-of-pocket costs for the year. We can help project these figures.
  • Determine what tax preferred ways there are to fund out-of-pocket costs.
  • Obtain physician prescriptions to support therapy.
  • Communicate with C&FD Client Services Team:
    • Notify us anytime there is a change in insurance benefit or plan.
    • Notify us anytime there is a change in guarantor or policy holder.
    • Notify us anytime there is a change in primary doctors or specialists.
    • Coordinate insurance benefits for multiple services, as some plans have daily limitations.
    • Plan ahead for annual visit maximums.

At each visit:

  • Check in with the client services team prior to each visit.
    • Checking in notifies the therapist that you have arrived.
    • Checking in ensures that you stay current with insurance coverage of services and can apply your co-pay or coinsurance to your visit.
  • We use American Medical Association (AMA) diagnosis and treatment codes that all insurance companies and professionals can reference.
    • A therapist selects applicable procedure codes based on what happens during each session. Some sessions may include equipment checks, caregiver training, re-evaluation of progress to goals, or other services such as splinting or taping. Therefore, out-of-pocket costs may vary from one session to another.

For the full document, click here.

GET STARTED NOW

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services

Teaching sign language to kids, tips from our speech therapy team

Thursday, Feb 2, 2017 by Child & Family Development

The Child and Family Development speech therapy team helps young children who have expressive and receptive language difficulties.  Often, a speech therapist will recommend teaching some basic sign language to expedite improved communication.

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services

Physical therapist, Gail Fennimore, celebrates 23 years at C&FD

Tuesday, Jan 31, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Gail Fennimore!

Gail Fennimore PT PCS C/NDT is a physical therapist at Child and Family Development- Midtown.  This month, she celebrates 23 years!  

She shares this tidbit:

"I chose to become a PT after a high school injury.  I received physical therapy and was excited by the field even then.  After all of the time, the key to staying motivated is to be curious!"

Great advice from a great therapist!

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Gail Fennimore

Physical Therapy: Climbing Stairs Around-The-House with Katie Eggleston DPT

Monday, Jan 30, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Katie Eggleston DPT, physical therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, emphasizes that we can improve our health and build motor skills not just in a physical therapy session or gym, but in everyday events and activities already happening around the house. In January, she shares:

Here is a general timeline for mastering stair climbing:

  • Crawling up stairs by 9-12 months
  • Walking up steps placing two feet on each step while holding a rail or parents hand by 18 months
  • Independently walking up stairs with two feet on each step by 24-30 months
  • Walking up or down steps placing one foot on each step while holding a rail by 2 years, 7 months- 3 years
  • Independently walking up or down stairs with one foot on each step by 3 years 

Katie shares that children often go up first- ascent comes before descent!  Parents may see scooting, crawling or sliding down stairs even if they can walk up. Children with access to stairs in their homes were more likely to learn to ascend stairs at a younger age, but all children are equally likely to descend at the same age, regardless of access to the stairs.

Parent/ caregiver involvement is key for safety and encouragement.  To help a child master stair climbing:

  • An adult must always be present for safety.  
  • Baby gates should be installed at the top and bottom of staircases until independent mastery has occurred. Cover any openings (banisters e.g.) to prevent accidents or escapes.
  • Encourage gross motor development of climbing by letting infants crawl over couch cushions on the floor, benches, crates or even parent's legs.
  • When intiitally practicing on stairs, hold both of the child's hands. Progress gradually to one hand hold and one hand on rail, then one hand on rail and one on wall.
  • Start with just a few steps up and down, rather than tackling the whole staircase at once.  This can be intimidating and scary for kids.
  • If a child is unwilling to climb with one hand on the rail and one hand free, giving them a toy to hold in the free hand.  The toy can be motivating and distracting.  
  • Use visual targets on the steps! Print out pictures of feet or put stickers on the steps to indicate the path.  
  • Encourage strengthening of both sides equally. Typically, a child will lead up stairs with their stronger leg and lead down stairs with their weaker leg. Practice with both feet.

Katie recommends a National Institute of Health article titled “How and when infants learn to climb stairs” here.  

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

 

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, Katie Eggleston

How to Get the Most Out Of Therapy- Home Programs and Follow-Through

Friday, Jan 27, 2017 by Child & Family Development

This is the second of three HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OUT OF THERAPY AT CHILD AND FAMILY DEVELOPMENT posts. This post is about: Home Programs and Follow-Through

A therapist will share information and recommendations regularly.  

  • Review the evaluation results, treatment goals and progress reports. Ask questions!
  • Talk with the therapist at each session. Observe some or all of the treatment sessions.
  • Follow the home program. Often, you can incorporate the therapeutic activities into what you are already doing.
  • Follow therapist recommendations for other services and complete these appointments promptly.
  • Allow professionals to share information with one another by completing an Authorization for Release of Information with a member of our client services team.
  • Your therapist may suggest a variety of treatment techniques and schedule changes over the course of treatment. Have a regular and open dialogue about these suggestions.

For the full document, click here.

GET STARTED NOW

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Speech Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Educational Services, C&FD Psychological Services

Rethinking tummy time, expert advice from Ann Guild MACCCSLP C/NDT

Thursday, Jan 26, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Ann Guild MA CCC-SLP C/NDT is a speech therapist at Child and Family Development- Midtown in Charlotte.  Ann is our most tenured and experienced speech- language pathologist on staff.  She has much advanced training including Neurodevelopmental Treatment™ (NDT) certification, which qualifies her to incorporate neuromotor components into her evaluation and treatment of children and teens.

Ann has prepared a helpful guide for families of little ones that is all about gravity and includes important body positions for holding, eating and resting. She shares:

A lot has been written about tummy time and how to help parents be more comfortable putting their infants on their tummies. Despite all the advice, parents remain reluctant to leave their crying infants on their tummies for very long.  The problem is not the importance of tummy time, but in the name itself. Tummy time implies that infants need to be put down on their tummies for extended periods during the day. The more important consideration is the need to provide options during the day that counteract or balance the extended period of time spent on their backs at night.

When the force of gravity is coming at an infant’s face and mouth during back lying, the tongue is pulled back into the throat. If during the day, the child stays on their back or reclined in a carrier, the tongue cannot come forward into the mouth for eating and later for talking. They become overwhelmed by gravity.

 BACK TO SLEEP

 SUPINE IN A CARRIER

Babies in daycare are especially at risk. Helping parents advocate for positioning options for their babies can be big step in helping these children thrive.

More common positioning and carrying that keeps the child vulnerable to the effect of gravity are pictured below. These positions allow gravity to pull the tongue back in the mouth making eating difficult.

 CARRYING IN SUPINE

 FEEDING IN SUPINE

 SUPINE IN BASSINET FOR NAPS

 SUPINE IN PILLOW FOR NAPS

In my practice as a Speech-Language Pathologist, the children I see most are otherwise typical babies who have difficulty taking the bottle or breast or later making the transition to solid food. Their difficulty comes from the force of gravity pulling the tongue back in the mouth during their many hours of back lying at night and sitting reclined in a carrier or lying on their backs during the day. We can eliminate this feeding difficulty for many typical infants by simply focusing on positioning, carrying, holding, and feeding them in positions that minimize or balance the effect of gravity on the mouth.  When we see otherwise typical babies at 3-4 months, who are not eating well, we can tell the moms that there is no food aversion or eating problem. We can say that their baby is overwhelmed by gravity.

If the feeding issues have already begun, they can be reversed by concentrating on positioning. The need to focus on positioning is most important for the first 3-4 months. Once children start to move and roll, they learn to manage gravity by themselves. If they have been left in supine, this may not happen without help.

Here are some examples of positioning and carrying options that allow the tongue to come forward in the mouth for eating and eventually for talking.

 CARRYING ON SHOULDER

 PRONE IN LAP

 PRONE IN LAP

 PRONE ON QUILT IN LAP

 ON MOM'S SHOULDER

 CARRYING IN SIDE LYING OVER MOM'S ARM

 ON MOM'S CHEST

 IN CARRIER WRAP

 NAP ON BOPPY

 NAP ON MOM'S CHEST

 FEEDING IN SITTING

When parents understand the process and are successful and creative in carrying, holding, positioning, and feeding their babies in a way that balances the time spent on their backs at night; they are empowered and their infants thrive.

Read more about Ann Guild's expertise and services here.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

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Topics: Ann Guild, C&FD Speech Therapy Services

Child and Family Development welcomes speech therapist, Hilary Frank

Wednesday, Jan 25, 2017 by Child & Family Development

Hilary Frank MA CCC-SLP, joined the Child and Family Development team this month.      

Hilary is a licensed speech therapist with experience as an early education teacher as well as a SLP in outpatient and public school settings. She enjoys helping people grow their expressive and receptive language skills to be effective and independent communicators.

Hilary received her MA in Speech Pathology- Audiology from South Carolina State University and an undergraduate in elementary education from University of Central Florida. 

She works at the Pineville office.

Welcome Hilary!  

Read more about our speech therapy services here.       

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

 

 

 

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Topics: C&FD Speech Therapy Services, Hilary Frank

Making Sense of Sensory Processing

Tuesday, Jan 24, 2017 by Child & Family Development

 

Ever know a child who seems to fall, trip and bump into things more than peers?  Many skills must be in place to support good balance and proprioception. Adequate sensory processing skills, range of motion, and strength are foundational skills required for balance and knowing where you are in space.

SENSORY PROCESSING & PROPRIOCEPTION

The Vestibular System:

  • Tells us where our heads and bodies are in relation to the surface of the earth
  • Tells us whether we are moving or standing still and whether objects are moving or motionless in relation to our body
  • Tells us about the direction in which we are moving and how fast we are moving
  • Lays a foundation for visual input
  • Without good information coming from the vestibular system, sights and sounds in the environment don’t make sense.

The Visual System:

  • Our eyes should work together in a teamed fashion with smooth movements to scan our environment and notice how close or far things are from our body to help us maneuver through space.

The Proprioceptive System:

  • Proprioceptive input receptors are in the muscles and joints and give information to the brain about the amount of stretch in each muscle and pressure on each joint.
  • This provides an accurate picture of the body’s position in space without the use of vision.  
  • Proprioception provides feedback for grading muscle movements and for how much force is needed to interact with an object or person in the environment.

BALANCE

Balance Expectations by age:

  • 3 year old - balance on 1 foot for 3 seconds
  • 3 year old – use alternating feet when climbing stairs
  • 4 year old - hop on 1 foot
  • 5 year old - balance on 1 foot for 10 seconds

Red Flags for Balance Difficulties

  • Child trips/falls/bumps into things often
  • Child who is fearful of movement
  • Child who seeks out movement
  • Child who appears to have good balance while moving, but poor balance when expected to stay still
  • Child who has difficulty moving through dynamic environments
  • Child who has difficulty walking across different or dynamic surfaces
  •  

HOW DO THESE SYSTEMS WORK TOGETHER?

  • Information from these body systems is processed and combined in order for a person to adapt and react to a changing environment.

HAVE A CONCERN?

Contact an occupational therapist at Child and Family Development for a standardized assessment of motor and sensory skills. Treatment modalities may include:

  • Sensory Integration
  • Core/Postural Strengthening
  • Postural Control and Stability Training
  • Balance Strategies Training
  • Visual-Motor Exercises
  • Oculomotor Training
  • Therapeutic Listening ®

Click here to read more about our occupational therapy services.

Click here for a printable page about sensory processing.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: C&FD Physical Therapy Services, C&FD Occupational Therapy Services, C&FD Psychological Services

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insights is a helpful blog brought to you by Child & Family Development

Child & Family Development is a multi-disciplinary pediatric clinic serving the needs of Charlotte area children and their families.

CONTACT US TODAY TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT

Contact

  • MIDTOWN OFFICE
  • 4012 Park Road, Suite 200
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.332.4834
  • PINEVILLE OFFICE
  • 10516 Park Road
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.541.9080

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