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insights is a helpful blog brought to you by Child & Family Development

Child & Family Development is a multi-disciplinary pediatric clinic serving the needs of Charlotte area children and their families.

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  • MIDTOWN OFFICE
  • 4012 Park Road, Suite 200
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.332.4834
  • PINEVILLE OFFICE
  • 10516 Park Road
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.541.9080

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General
The information contained in this website is intended to provide general educational information and client education on certain topics only and is not intended to offer healthcare/medical advice. This information should not be considered complete and should not be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice from a licensed healthcare professional. Child and Family Development is not liable or responsible for any advice, course of treatment, diagnosis or any other information or services you obtain through this website. If you have, or suspect you have, a health problem you should never disregard medical advice or delay seeking medical attention because of something you have read on this website. Never rely on information on this website in place of seeking professional medical advice. If you have questions about a medical condition or seek advice, see your healthcare professional immediately.

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Links from our website to other websites are provided as a service to help users find appropriate information. Absolutely no responsibility is taken by Child and Family Development or its employees for the accuracy of the information you may receive from any of the referred links. If you have questions about a medical condition or seek medical advice, contact your healthcare professional.

Child psychologists teach the ABCs of managing behavior in kids

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 by Child & Family Development

The Antecedent-Behavior-Consequence (ABC) behavior management method is one of many features of Applied Behaviroal Anlaysis (ABA)

In this method, a behavior is a specific action that a person does that can be observed. 

Example:

Behavior--Tommy calls out in class. (concrete and measurable)

Not a behavior--Julie is disruptive.

In order to change a behavior, you first need to understand the chain of events that determine what will happen with a specific behavior in the future.

A=Antecedent:  Situation that comes BEFORE a behavior.  This sets the stage for a behavior to occur.  This can be an immediate setting event (i.e., parent request) or a long-term setting event (i.e., did not sleep enough the night before).

B=Behavior:  The actual behavior that is observed.  It is important to observe the behavior and determine if your child is having a skill or performance deficit.  A skill deficit is when the child does not have the skill in his/her repertoire.  A performance deficit is when the child has the skill but does not choose to use it.  It is also important to identify the correct behavior and what function the behavior is serving your child.

C=Consequences: What happens immediately following the behavior.  This can occur naturally or be planned.  The type of consequence that follows a behavior will determine if the behavior will occur more frequently or less frequently in the future.

With careful observation and documentation of the ABC's, one can start to better understand the behaviors, the chain of events, and the factors that are contributing to the behavior.  

Need help implementing this method?  Call 704-451-9080 to schedule an intake with one of our child psychologistsClick here to read more about our counseling services. 

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Topics: Aleksandra Liss, Gretchen Hunter, Chris Vrabel, Joy Granetz, Brandyn Street, Devon Redmond

What is pediatric physical therapy?

Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Erin Harkins, DPT and the other physical therapists on our team often help kids and teens develop gross motor skills for the first time, which is called habilitative PT.  

Pediatric physical therapy is not just rehabilitation of injuries or therapy for “little adults”.  Pediatric physical therapy runs the gamut of treatment.  While it includes rehabilitation from sports injuries, post-surgery, broken bones and other conditions, it more commonly addresses “habilitation” rather than “re-habilitation”. That is, we are working with children to develop gross motor skills for the first time, rather than regain skills after a loss. This “habilitation” often occurs when there is a gross motor delay related to late crawling and late walking.  At times, a delay is present in conjunction with a medical diagnosis, such as cerebral palsy, spina bifida, Down syndrome, mitochondrial disorder, just to name a few. 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

Our team consists of 6 licensed physical therapists, rather than assistants or aides.  The ladies have vast experience and special expertise including 3 doctoral practitioners, 2 Neurodevelopmental Treatment (NDT) certified practitioners, 2 Aquatic Therapy & Rehab Institute (ATRI) certified practitioners, 1 Pediatric Clinical Specialist, as well as many other expanded trainings.   

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Topics: Erin Harkins

Preparing for End-Of-Grade (EOG): talk with the teacher regularly

Wednesday, Jan 21, 2015 by Child & Family Development

In North Carolina, elementary school students are required to take End Of Grade (EOG) assessments. Read more about Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools EOG assessments on the CMS website here

At Child and Family Development, Marie Pacini and the other Educators can help kids get prepared through the Strive For Five program. 

Marie is starting a blog series that offers some suggestions you can do now at home and school.  

Her first suggestion is: maintain communication with your child’s teacher

The EOGs are a cumulative assessment of all of the standards your child has practiced and learned all year long. Therefore, if your child has struggled with making inferences while reading or solving word problems containing fractions, then this needs to be the area of remediation at home. This does not mean ask the teacher for additional homework in these are

as, but it does mean that you can ask about apps or computer games that focus specifically on these skills. Your child’s teacher should also be able to provide you with specific comprehension questions you can ask your child while they are reading their books at home or skill-based questions based on topics learned in math.

Your child’s teacher is the biggest resource you have so utilize them to your child’s benefit. As a parent, you are there to reinforce and support what was learned at school, so ensure you understand how you can best support your child at home.

Connect with Marie directly if you have questions about EOG assessments or the Strive For Five program:

Read more about the Strive For Five program here

Be on the lookout for the next blog which will discuss ways to establish healthy study habits!

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Topics: Marie Pacini

Child & Family Development celebrates with Barb Hartshorn, speech therapist

Tuesday, Jan 20, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Barb Hartshorn, MS, CCC-SLP marks 8 years at Child and Family Development this month! She is a speech therapist at the Pineville office, just south of Charlotte.

One of Barb's areas of expertise is feeding and swallowing difficulties in children and teens.  While each and every speech therapy session can bring success, she is most satisfied when things improve outside of our office.  The best is when people report happy family mealtimes and birthday parties without fuss. 

Barb appreciates that the Child and Family Development office space allows for real-life opportunities to work on eating and drinking skills.  In addition to her private room, our kitchen and dining area offer a great simulated setting for practice. 

Like all of our 30+ therapists, Barb loves the multi-disciplinary team approach that comes only with a large group of providers working under one roof.   She learns from them and shares her own knowledge too.  For example, a speech therapist and an occupational therapist may treat or co-treat a child with feeding difficulties and address oral strength, core strength, posture, fine motor and more, all at the same time, to the benefit of the client as well as the therapists.   

Read more about the Sequential Oral Sensory (SOS) approach that Barb uses here

Happy C&FD Anniversary!

 

Want to learn more about our team? 

Sign up for C&FD News

 

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Topics: Barbara Hartshorn

Child & Family Development help kids and teens with anxiety, ADHD

Monday, Jan 19, 2015 by Child & Family Development

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Topics: Aleksandra Liss, Gretchen Hunter, Chris Vrabel, Joy Granetz, Brandyn Street, Devon Redmond

Worried about dyslexia?: 10 signs that it is & 10 signs that it is not

Sunday, Jan 18, 2015 by Child & Family Development


Our Educators, including Marie Pacini, MAT, report that despite the fact that dyslexia is the most common reading disorder (affects 5-8% of the population), there is still a great deal of confusion around what it is and what it is not.

Adapted from Essentials of Dyslexia Assessment and Intervention written by Dr. Nancy Mather and Barbara J. Wendling, here are two quick lists t help you determine the symptoms and characteristics of dyslexia and to clarify what symptoms may coexist but not necessarily apply. 

WHAT IT IS: Symptoms and Characteristics of Dyslexia 

  • Difficulty learning letter names, sounds and rhymes 
  • Confusion of letters and words with similar appearance (e.g., p and q and saw and was)
  • Confusion of letters with similar sounds (e.g., the sound of f vs. the sound of v)
  • Reversals and transpositions of letters and words that persist after age 7 (e.g., b and d and on and no)
  • Difficulty arranging letters to correctly spell words
  • Difficulty recalling the visual image of irregular words when reading and spelling (e.g., once)
  • Spelling the same word in different ways on the same page
  • Spelling words phonetically (the way they sound) as opposed to the way they look (e.g., duz for does)
  • Difficulty pronouncing some multi-syllabic words correctly
  • Slow word perception that affects rate and fluency

WHAT IT IS NOT: Although these symptoms may coexist with dyslexia, it is important to know that these alone do not mean your child is dyslexic. 

  • A pervasive oral language impairment
  • A primary problem in attention or behavior
  • A primary problem in reading comprehension
  • A primary problem in written expression
  • Low motivation or limited effort
  • Poor vision or hearing
  • Primary emotional or behavioral problems
  • Limited intelligence
  • Related to ethnic background or family income
  • A result of poor teaching or limited educational opportunity
Marie is a National Board Certified Teacher and provides evaluation and treatment of dyslexia and other learning disabilities to children, teenagers and young adults at Child and Family Development. 

Click to read more about dyslexia.

 


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Topics: Marie Pacini

Educators explain the difference between dyslexia and dysgraphia

Friday, Jan 16, 2015 by Child & Family Development

child_8-1

Mary "Mo" Froneberger, MAT is an educational specialist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, works regularly with kids with dyslexia and dysgraphia, among other learning disabilties. Recently, she read this article by Mark Griffin on Understood noting the differences between the two diagnoses.    

Mo says, "This article provides great insight into characteristics of both dyslexia and dysgraphia, as well as information about their differences and similarities. Dyslexia is a reading disorder that impacts word decoding and/or reading fluency as well as spelling. Dysgraphia is more of a written language disorder that impacts handwriting and written composition as well as spelling. A person can have one condition or both."

Our Educators offer both evaluation and treatment services to identify and remediate these difficulties.  

Read more about dyslexia on our blog.

   

 

 

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Topics: Mary Froneberger

President's Point Of View: some things never change

Thursday, Jan 15, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Pam Jones is the President of Child and Family Development. Here, she shares her point of view on change as we begin our celebration of 35 years in business. 

In a world where change is constant, there is peace in comfort knowing some things will never change. Child and Family Development offers the gift of skilled and talented therapists to children and families all across greater Charlotte. There are simply things you cannot learn from an app, you-tube video, or podcast. Our therapists are actively engaged in helping children of all ages reach their potential. The songs we hear in the hallway may change through the years; let’s face it, with music there really is a “Circle of Life” and a time to just “Let It Go”. But, the ability to teach a child to walk, or talk, or write, or be confident, never changes.  In my 20 years here, I’ve witnessed thousands of success stories and I plan on seeing thousands more.  As we celebrate our 35th anniversary this year I continue to be amazed by what I see children accomplish. So, this year, as the trends come and go, music changes, and there’s yet another app for that, Child and Family Development will still be here doing what we do best. Some things are never meant to change.

 

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Topics: Pam Jones

Child & Family Development celebrates with Jessica Hoffarth

Tuesday, Jan 13, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Jessica Hoffarth MS, OTR/L marks 4 years at Child and Family Development this month! She is an occupational therapist at the Midtown office in Charlotte.

She appreciates that she can specialize in certain clinical areas, such as significant physical disabilities, hand therapy and Saebo.  There are not many places where you can work so closely with physical therapists and others to help a child. 

Jessica enjoys the built-in access to the many other pediatric therapists in our office. Sometimes, it's a quick chat or suggestion to use in her occupational therapy session and other times it is collaborating and co-treating on a case. 

 

Happy C&FD Anniversary!

 

Want to learn more about our team? 

Sign up for C&FD News

 

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Topics: Jessica Hoffarth

Occupational Therapist loves calming chairs for people with autism

Tuesday, Jan 13, 2015 by Child & Family Development

autism_snuggle_chair_tl_120514_0098F

Megan Bevington, MS, OTR/L, an occupational therapy team member at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, works regularly with kids with sensory processing difficulties.  Recently, she read this article in the Kansas City Star about some students who invented a chair that provides sensory input and helps to calm a person who is over stimulated by the environment.  

 

Megan says, "I think this is just awesome. I have so many children who really benefit from deep pressure to help then achieve that “just right” state of regulation so that they can function optimally in their environments. To think there are people out there continuing to innovate new concepts for these children with sensory processing delays is really reassuring and comforting. I can’t wait to see what they continue to do with these chairs." 

We think these chairs would be particularly useful for people with autism.  

Read more about sensory processing services here

Megan Bevington and our other licensed occupational therapists are available to share their expertise.  

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

 

 

 

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Topics: Megan Bevington

What is a Fidget?

Friday, Jan 9, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Occupational therapists likes Kati Berlin often have suggestions for home and school life. 

A fidget is a small object, like a koosh ball, stress ball, pencil, keychain, bracelet, paper clip, eraser, or small toy, that can be beneficial for helping a child pay attention in school, focus a need to move, or deal with anxiety. They are objects that can be pulled, squeezed or moved around with your hands or fingers while paying attention and looking at the teacher. Fidgets can be helpful for kids with ADHD, sensory processing disorders, or anxiety during classroom time or at home.

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Topics: Kati Berlin

Child and Family Development celebrates 35 years in Charlotte in 2015

Thursday, Jan 8, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Established in 1980, the Child and Family Development mission is to provide comprehensive, integrated and quality service to children, adolescents, young adults and their families. 2015 means 35 years in Charlotte. 

Our multi-disciplinary clinical team has made it happen from way back when to everyday now.  More than 30 therapists offer expertise in many areas: 

Occupational Therapy

  • 8 Masters-level occupational therapists
  • 1 Neuro-Developmental Treatment (NDT) certified OTR/L
  • 5 Sequential Oral Sensory (SOS) certified OTs
  • Clinical focuses include: autism, fine motor skills, handwriting, Interactive Metronome, mealtime/ picky eating difficulties, motor development, Saebo, sensory processing and Therapeutic Listening®

Physical Therapy

  • 6 PTs, including 2 PTs with over 20 years of experience and 3 Doctoral-level therapists
  • 2 Neuro-Developmental Treatment (NDT) certified PTs
  • 2 Aquatic Therapy & Rehab Institute (ATRI) certified PTs 
  • Total Motion Release (TMR) trained PTs
  • Clinical focuses include: balance, coordination, gross motor skills, Interactive Metronome, motor development, strength and torticollis

Speech-Language Therapy 

  • 8 Masters-level speech therapists 
  • 1 Neuro-Developmental Treatment (NDT) certified SLP
  • 1 PROMPT trained SLP
  • 2 Hanen certified SLPs
  • Clinical focuses include: articulation, feeding/ swallowing skills, language development, speech, augmentative communication and social skills 

Educational Assessment & Support

  • 3 Master-level educators/ diagnosticians
  • 1 National Board Certified teacher 
  • Public school experience 
  • Orton-Gillingham trained practitioners 
  • Clinical focuses include: dyslexia, executive function, learning disabilities, non-verbal learning disorder, tutoring, academic coaching 

Psychological Assessment & Support

  • 6 Doctoral-level psychologists
  • 2 neuropsychologists
  • 3 ADOS- trained (autism) diagnosticians
  • 1 Cogmed Qualified Coach  
  • 1 psychiatrist 
  • Clinical focuses include: autism, attention difficulties/ ADHD, learning disabilities, anxiety, depression, behavior, counseling, social skills 

Follow our blog throughout the year to learn more about each therapist here

Sign up for C&FD news by email here

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Child and Family Development welcomes psychologist, Devon Redmond, Ph.D.

Wednesday, Jan 7, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Devon Redmond, Ph.D., clinical psychologist, joins the Child and Family Development team.  She is based at the Midtown office.

Dr. Redmond is a licensed psychologist providing assessment and therapy for children and adolescents. In addition to conducting evaluations for learning disorders, ADHD, and developmental delays, she evaluates children for autism spectrum disorders.  She enjoys working with school-age children and teens to manage issues such as anxiety, depression, and ADHD.  She uses a range of treatment modalities, including cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), social skill building, and distress tolerance and mindfulness training.

Dr. Redmond received a Bachelor's degree from Cornell University, and a Ph.D. in School Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Prior to joining Child and Family Development, she was in private practice at Chapel Hill Pediatric Psychology for several years. She has trained at TEACCH, completed a pre-doctoral internship at the UNC Chapel Hill School of Medicine, and a postdoctoral fellowship at the Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities.  In addition, she has co-authored book chapters on autism.  

Welcome Dr. Redmond! 

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Topics: Devon Redmond

Occupational Therapist reviews article about sleep and children

Wednesday, Jan 7, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Jessica Hoffarth, MS, OTR/L, an occupational therapy team member at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, often asks parents about their child's sleep/wake cycle during the evaluation process.    

Recently, she read this article about troubled children and sleep difficulites.  Jessica often make suggestions for helping kids get into a bedtime routine.  As necessary, she collaborates with a child psychologist on our team too. 

A sleep journal and/or a monitor can track:

  • what time they are put to bed
  • how often they need to be checked or resettled  
  • how long it took to get to sleep
  • if they woke up during the night
  • how many hours of sleep they get 
  • arousal activities

Monitor all acitivites and inputs to determine what helps calm your child, including sensory inputs like touch, taste, sight, sound and movement.  Then, implement these during the time of day leading up to when your child is often tired or is preparing for rest. 

She and other licensed occupational therapists are available to share their expertise.  

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

 

 

 

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Topics: Jessica Hoffarth, Brandyn Street, Devon Redmond

What should a 6-month-old be eating?

Tuesday, Jan 6, 2015 by Child & Family Development

A good time to start introducing solids for your baby is around 6 months of age. However, keep in mind that breast milk and/or formula is the main source of nutrition for your child until they turn 1-year-old. So,  this time is for exploration, experimentation, and learning for you and baby.  They will make a mess, which is a great sensory experience for them so be ready for a clean up!

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Topics: Barbara Hartshorn, Allison Parker, Abbey Wash, Megan Bevington, Courtney Stanley, Ann Guild

Looking for pediatric therapy services near Union County?

Monday, Jan 5, 2015 by Child & Family Development

 

 Our Pineville office is less than 5 miles from the border and easily accessible from I-77 and the 485 loop.

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Child and Family Development: 2015 insurance plans

Monday, Jan 5, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Happy New Year from C&FD!

In 2015, Child and Family Development continues to participate in these plans and will file to all other plans on an out-of-network basis:

Aetna
Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC
Cigna
Medcost
Norht Carolina Medicaid
Optum Health
Primary Physician Care
South Carolina Medicaid (OT, PT)
United Healthcare
 
 
Aetna
Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC
Primary Physician Care
 
 
Out-of-pocket only

 

Ready to get started? Contact our Client Services Team at 704-541-9080. 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation:  Physical Therapist Occupational Therapist Speech Therapist

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PROMPT speech therapy services from Melinda Bumgardner Schatz

Sunday, Jan 4, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Melinda Bumgardner Schatz, speech therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, offers PROMPT-based speech therapy services to Charlotte children. 

Recently, she received a lovely note from a grateful mother: 

"...Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!  Within 2 minutes of coming home today, <my son> said, "MaMa, Bye and his name".  I can't even explain how much every new word he says means to me.  Thank you again for believing in him and for helping him continue to make progress!"

Read more about Melinda's PROMPT speech therapy services on our blog: http://tinyurl.com/lpsfdo8  

Want to learn more?

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

 

 

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Topics: Melinda Bumgardner

Research confirms benefits of pediatric occupational therapy

Saturday, Jan 3, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Jessica Hoffarth, MS, OTR/L, an occupational therapy team member at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, provides sensory processing treatment to children.    She read this article in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders that confirms the benefits of this intervention. 

Here, she also works with Chris VrabelBrandyn Street and Devon Redmond, both child psychologists with a specialty in autism. 

She and other licensed occupational therapists are available to share their expertise.  

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

 journal

 

 

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Topics: Jessica Hoffarth, Chris Vrabel, Brandyn Street, Devon Redmond

Prematurity and its impact on the school years

Friday, Jan 2, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Consequences of a child's premature birth can follow them into the school years

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY AND PHYSICAL THERAPY

These children may be described as clumsy or uncoordinated. They may have difficulty acquiring complex motor skills such as skipping, hopping or doing jumping jacks, as well as poor physical endurance when compared to peers. 

SPEECH AND LANGUAGE

In addition, these children may have difficulty following directions in the classroom, remembering assignments or learning to read. 

EDUCATION AND ACADEMIC SUPPORT

Research indicates children born three months prematurely are 3-4 times more likely to struggle in school than full-term peers and can have learning disabilities that persist through the teenage years.  

CHILD PSYCHOLOGY

One study found that premature children had higher levels of anxiety, depression, aggression and lower self concepts than full-term peers. 

The multi-disciplinary team of pediatric therapists at Child and Family Development in Charlotte offers an array of services for children from infancy into young adulthood.  

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation:  Physical Therapist Occupational Therapist Speech Therapist

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Topics: Marion Wilm, Lisa Gigliotti, Barbara Hartshorn, Chris Vrabel, Allison Parker, Katie Haywood, Gail Fennimore, Ann Guild, Devon Redmond