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Child & Family Development is a multi-disciplinary pediatric clinic serving the needs of Charlotte area children and their families.

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Contact

  • MIDTOWN OFFICE
  • 4012 Park Road, Suite 200
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.332.4834
  • PINEVILLE OFFICE
  • 10516 Park Road
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.541.9080

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General
The information contained in this website is intended to provide general educational information and client education on certain topics only and is not intended to offer healthcare/medical advice. This information should not be considered complete and should not be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice from a licensed healthcare professional. Child and Family Development is not liable or responsible for any advice, course of treatment, diagnosis or any other information or services you obtain through this website. If you have, or suspect you have, a health problem you should never disregard medical advice or delay seeking medical attention because of something you have read on this website. Never rely on information on this website in place of seeking professional medical advice. If you have questions about a medical condition or seek advice, see your healthcare professional immediately.

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Links from our website to other websites are provided as a service to help users find appropriate information. Absolutely no responsibility is taken by Child and Family Development or its employees for the accuracy of the information you may receive from any of the referred links. If you have questions about a medical condition or seek medical advice, contact your healthcare professional.

Don't Take Our Word For It: improvements from occupational therapy

Friday, May 27, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Melissa Petcu, MS, OTR/L is an occupational therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development.  Recently, a parent sent her an affirming and kind note!  

Here is a paraphrased excerpt: 

It's always a challenge to talk at the end of appointments but I wanted to thank you and tell you how much we appreciate all of the hard work you have put in.  We are really starting to see a lot of good progress and change with him which I'm sure a direct reflection of your OT sessions. His teacher showed me all of the art work he's been doing lately.  The feedback I've heard is he is also participating more.  I've seen a lot of progress at gymnastics. He's doing much better at home too.  He loves playing with Legos and he's getting better at putting the small pieces together.  So, thanks again for all of your hard work and we look forward to continuing on and seeing more great change!

This is what occupational therapy is all about!  

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

 

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Topics: Melissa Petcu, Occupational Therapy, Testimonials

Riding a bike with Amy Sturkey, physical therapist

Thursday, May 26, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Amy Sturkey LPT is an experienced and highly trained physical therapist at Child and Family Development in Charlotte. 

 

 

During Amy's 20+ year physical therapy career, she has helped kids, teens and young adults reach their potential with everything from learning to crawl, stand, walk, run, ride a bike, and much more.

This summer, her goal is to help young people get rolling! 

She shares, "I think people start too hard when they try to teach their child to ride a bike.  I often address the necessary skills separately before working on all the skills together."

 

  • A child needs to be able to steer pushing a shopping cart and a low riding toy when they are being pushed before he or she should be expected to steer and pedal a bike.  
  • Balance is important too. Typically a 5 year old can learn to ride a bike.  A 5-year-old can balance on either foot for 10 seconds with hands on hips.  Keep the training wheels if your child can’t balance 10 seconds well on each foot.   
  • Many children have trouble monitoring their environment.  I work a lot on the child practicing negotiating moving obstacle courses on their own 2 feet before expecting a child to do that on a bike. 
  • Pedaling is an alternating reciprocal coordination activity.  If  child can’t run, they are going to have a hard time riding a bike.  They need to have the coordination to  be able to do simple coordination jumps on the land before the child could be coordinated enough to pedal, steer, break and monitor his environment.

Read more about her Learning To Ride A Bike program here

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Topics: Amy Sturkey, Physical Therapy

managing (or minimizing!) IEP disputes

Wednesday, May 25, 2016 by Child & Family Development

At Child and Family Development, Mary "Mo" Froneberger MAT is one of three Educational Specialists who helps parents navigate the school system including IEPs.   

Recently, Mo reviewed an article from Understood.org about options for resolving an IEP dispute, based the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) gives you several ways to resolve disputes: 

  • Informal Negotiation: Talking with the school during IEP meetings
  • Mediation: A voluntary process with third-party help
  • Due Process Hearing: Starts with formal complaint and ends with decision
  • Civil Lawsuit: Going to court after due process
  • State Complaint: Asking the state to step in
  • Office for Civil Rights: Going to the feds

While she found the suggestions practical and informative, Mo prefers avoiding or minimizing conflict from the beginning.  During consultations and conferences with families, Mo often recommends the following when families are faced with difficulties, knowing it can be difficult to be your both a parent and advocate.

A C&FD educator can also assist you via evaluations, consultations, tutoring and academic coaching.      

Read more about our IEP support services here

Read more about our education team here.  

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, Education

Summertime Socials: a sensory and language social skills group

Tuesday, May 24, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

2016

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Topics: Courtney Stanley, Speech Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Kristin Lyman

Speech therapist, Melinda Schatz completes PECS training

Monday, May 23, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

Speech therapist, Melinda Bumgardner Schatz MA CCC-SLP, completed a continuing education course this month about the widely used Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS).   

PECS was developed in 1985 as a unique augmentative/alternative communication intervention package for individuals with autism spectrum disorder and related developmental disabilities. It has received worldwide recognition for focusing on the initiation component of communication. PECS does not require complex or expensive materials. It was created with families, educators, and resident care providers in mind, so is readily used in a range of settings.  PECS begins by teaching an individual to give a picture of a desired item to a “communicative partner", who immediately honors the exchange as a request. The system goes on to teach discrimination of pictures and how to put them together in sentences. In the more advanced phases, individuals are taught to answer questions and to comment. 

PECS has been successful with individuals of all ages demonstrating a variety of communicative, cognitive and physical difficulties. Some learners using PECS also develop speech. Others may transition to a voice output system. The body of research supporting the effectiveness of PECS continues to expand, with research from countries around the world.

Read more about PECS on their website

Melinda was even pleased with the course than she expected and shares: 

"While I have used pictures as communication tools and visual aids for a long time in my speech therapy sessions, the PECS training was very helpful.  PECS is a very structured, research driven approach to building functional communication. A big focus of the program is initiating communication, a skill that children with autism spectrum disorder and other communication difficulties often struggle to acquire. I am excited to implement the PECS approach with some of the children I work with to help them become functional communicators."

The Child and Family Development team of 9 speech therapists offers free phone intakes and screens.  

   Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

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Topics: Melinda Schatz, Speech Therapy

Occupational Therapy: May Around-The-House with Melissa Petcu

Friday, May 20, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Melissa Petcu MS OTR/L, occupational therapist at the Midtown office, emphasizes that pediatric occupational therapy is all about "the job of living". Families can capitalize of events and activities already happening around the house to facilitate development and improve skills. In May, she shares:

"Last month a friend talked me into trying Burn Boot Camp. We’re both post-baby and it’s about time to be bikini body ready, right?? So I tried a couple of weeks of 5:30 am workouts and loved it. I quickly decided that I loved sleep more, especially with an 8-month-old that still wakes 3+ times a night.  I’m still trying to find my groove with exercising…"

While our children don’t really have to worry about being bikini body ready for the summer, there are ways to work on strengthening the core and upper body that can easily be worked into play and daily routines. Here’s a few ideas:

Core strengthening activities

  • Sit-ups
    • Use toys to increase interest and endurance
  • Super man catch/throw
  • Foot pass
    • Lay on back hold pillow, ball or other object with feet, then pass to partner’s feet
  • Blanket pull
    • Sit or lay on blanket and have sibling or parent pull with sheet or rope

Wrist and Shoulder Strengthening activities

  • Critter Walks
    • Bear, crab, and wheelbarrow
    • Crab soccer
  • Watch TV in prone prop
    • Lay on stomach, propped on elbows
  • Heavy Lifting
    • Carry, push, pull laundry basket, groceries or other heavy items
  • Sheet Tug-of-war
  • Chores
    • Yard work, sweep floors, fold laundry, wipe down dinner table, clean windows/mirrors or assist with dinner prep
  • Vertical Drawing
    • Draw or write on an easel, tape paper to wall or draw with shaving cream on side of tub

Hand strengthening activities

  • Pop beads
  • Legos
  • "Mr. Money" tennis ball
  • Cotton Ball Races
    • Squeeze a syringe (infant bulb syringe, turkey baster) to blow cotton balls in a race
  • Arts and Crafts
    • Hole punches, scissors
  • Play dough or putty
    • Homemade recipe

FINE MOTOR & VISUAL MOTOR activities

  • String cheerios on a dry spaghetti noodle
  • Make a dry pasta necklace by stringing different shaped pasta on a string
  • Use a baster to fill muffin tin or ice cube tray with colored water
  • Use tweezers to put small pom poms into ice cube tray
  • Put pipe cleaners through holes of a colander
  • Weave ribbon on a kitchen extension rack

OCULOMOTOR activities

  • Use straws to complete games such as blowing a pom poms across the kitchen table or sucking a bingo chip long enough to hold it on the end of the straw and then place in a container

SENSORY PROCESSING activities

  • Follow a recipe to make home-made play dough or something yummy 
  • Pour water, dry rice and dry beans into different containers
  • Use different kitchen tools such as a masher, dropper, fork or plastic wrap to paint

STRENGTHENING activities

  • Flip bean bags with a spatula. You could even make the bean bags with dried beans!

An occupational therapist provides practical suggestions for parents and caregivers as part of a home program. 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Melissa Petcu, Occupational Therapy

Education Intensives for Summer

Thursday, May 19, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Make time for learning this summer!

Our Educational Specialists offer Intensive Programs based on grade levels and subject areas. Programs are based on rising grade levels in Fall 2016. 

Kids can benefit from just one program or a series of programs over time. 

Individual or small group intensives are available.

 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS

Kindergarten Readiness: Pre-K and T-K students; Instruction builds pre-academic skills in reading, writing and math, as well as listening.

Math:  Mostly grades 1-6; Instruction is based on a multi-sensory approach to learning grade-level specific math skills that align with the Common Core standards.

Basic Reading: Mostly grades 1-5; Instruction focuses on stimulating and strengthening the underlying processing areas of phonological awareness and memory in order to improve sound awareness, word decoding, spelling, word recognition and reading fluency.

Writing: Mostly grades 1-5; Instruction focuses on helping students organize their thinking while executing a written piece. By creating an awareness of the various types of writing, as well as opportunities to plan and interact with various topics.  Students will learn strategies for improving their overall written expression skills.

Reading Comprehension: Mostly grades 1-5; Instruction focuses on using grade-level appropriate text to improve higher-order thinking skills so students can share main ideas, infer, predict and summarize written and verbal information.

Executive Functioning Skills (Elementary): Grades 3-5; Using research based practices, students will engage in interactive and fun activities that teach and promote age appropriate executive functioning skills.  By creating an awareness of executive skills across various settings and providing opportunities to practice those skills.  Students will learn strategies to support life-long learning.

Executive Functioning Skills (Middle School/High School): Grades 6-12; Students will be supported and encouraged as they learn strategies for strengthening their executive functioning skills.  Using research based practices and interactive lessons, middle and high school students will reflect on their personal learning styles and learn to apply various strategies in a meaningful way. 

CONTACTS

Jessica DeLing, M.Ed., Educational Specialist; jdeling@childandfamilydevelopment.com; 704-332-4834  ext.123

Mary “Mo” Froneberger, MAT, Educational Specialist; mfroneberger@childandfamilydevelopment.com; 704-541-9080  ext. 219

Marie Arrington, MAT, NBCT, Educational Specialist; mpacini@childandfamilydevelopment.com; 704-541-9080 ext. 218    

Read more about our educational services here.  

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, Education

What is Speech Therapy?

Wednesday, May 18, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

 

Speech therapists can help with communication, eating and more. 

We provide services to children, teens and young adults with developmental, neurological and congenital impairments.  Services can be habilitative (learning a skill for the first time) or rehabilitative (becoming more proficient at a skill or relearning a skill).  We focus on improving a child's ability to interact with and enjoy his environment.  

If you notice difficulties in one or more of these areas, an evaluation and treatment may be appropriate: 

  • Articulation/ Phonemic Awareness
  • Auditory Processing 
  • Communication
  • Oral Movement for speech and eating 
  • Phonological Awareness/ Phonological Processing
  • Voice/ Fluency 

Some of our speech therapy specialty services are:

Click here for more information on the Child and Family Development speech therapists at our Charlotte and Pineville offices!

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

 

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Topics: Stephanie Tolley, Allison Parker, Amy Elder, Ann Guild, Melinda Schatz, Speech Therapy, Kristin Lyman, Lisa Peterson

Marion Wilm OTR/L loves this story about development of adaptive shoe

Tuesday, May 17, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Marion Wilm OTR/L C/NDT is the most experienced and tenured occupational therapist at Child and Family Development and works at our Pineville office.  Over her 20+ year career, she has helped many children and teens become more adept at everyday tasks, like dressing, that are referred to as Activities of Daily Living (ADL) by occupational therapists.  She has seen tremendous changes in related products and technology, including this story of Huffington Post.  

The article by Lucy McCalmont tells the story of a young man with cerebral palsy who gained much function and independence over the years but struggled with shoes- getting them on and off, tying them, etc.  His frustration eventually led to a collaboration with Nike, starting with a letter he sent to the company while in high school in 2012.  "What resulted in the three years since was a partnership between Walzer and Hatfield’s team at Nike that culminated...with the company’s unveiling of the Zoom Soldier 8 Flyease. The shoe is the first of its kind for the company, and perhaps any athletic brand specifically designed and dedicated to help those with disabilities and difficulties of buying and wearing shoes."

Click the link to the story to get the full history, see a video about design and production and more.  

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Marion Wilm, Occupational Therapy

Mental Health Awareness Month: C&FD Psychological Services

Monday, May 16, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

May is Mental Health Awareness Month.  Psychologists help kids, teens and young adults live life to the fullest.  

They work closely with educators and other developmental therapists to understand the learning needs of school-aged children, adolescents and young adults during psycho-educational evaluations.  

Click here to read more about psycho-educational evaluations.  

Psychologists provide a variety of services including:

EVALUATIONS
  • Psycho-educational 
  • Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
  • Social/ Emotional/ Behavioral Adjustment 
  • Neuropsychology  
  • School Readiness
  • College Accommodations 
TREATMENTS
  • Individual Psychotherapy
  • Family Therapy
  • Groups

Our psychologists hold Doctorate degrees and are experienced diagnosticians. 

We help kids, adolescents and young adults with difficulties, including but not limited to:

  • ADHD and other attention difficulties
  • Anxiety
  • Developmental disabilities
  • Learning Differences and learning disabilities

Click here for more information about the psychology team at Child and Family Development!

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Topics: Aleksandra Liss, Gretchen Hunter, Chris Vrabel, Brandyn Street, Devon Redmond, Psychology, Amanda Cummings, Shavonda Bean

Prematurity: the school years

Friday, May 13, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Prematurity is a growing medical concern that has serious and predictable effects on child development.  2015 research by the March of dimes shows that one in ten babies is born prematurely in the United States, with Charlotte and North Carolina ranking average in comparison with other places.  

A baseline evaluation and ongoing assessment of children born prematurely can identify challenge areas and guide a proactive plan for a child to develop the necessary skills to be successful at every age. 

There are a number of ways that prematurity can affect children in the early stages of growth, especially during the school years.   Research indicates that children born three months prematurely are 3-4 times more likely to struggle in school than full term peers and can have learning disabilities that persist while teenagers. One study found higher levels of anxiety, depression and aggression and lower self esteem too.  

  • May be described as clumsy or uncoordinated
  • May have difficulty acquiring complex motor skills such as skipping, hopping or doing jumping jacks, as well as poor physical endurance when compared to peers
  • May have difficulty following directions in the classroom, remembering assignments and learning to read

Our multidisciplinary team recommends that all children born prematurely be assessed for developmental skills and educational readiness during infancy, the preschool years and school years. Even children who demonstrate typical development during early years remain at risk for delays and may experience significant challenges as they get older.  Early referral and early intervention allows potential problems to be identified and monitored to lessen the impact on academics and other areas.  An early and thorough plan will answer parent's questions, establish a support system and ensure optimal development.   

Child and Family Development has a focus to maximize the potential of every child with a holistic approach to therapy. We believe that a child of any age is connected to his family, his friends and his community and makes a valuable contribution to our world.  For more than 35 years, C&FD has been working closely with children and families, pediatricians, teachers and many others in the community.  Our therapy services include Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Speech Therapy, Education and Psychology. While these are our core areas of expertise, we also work with a child psychiatrist and offer many specialty services. With over 400 years of combined professional experience, our clinical team is the foundation of our success and service.  Our experienced team assists families with a wide variety of concerns and questions. Extended education and training enables us to help many people in extraordinary ways. We work with children and young adults of all ages-- from newborns to college age.  Our mission statement says it all- to provide comprehensive, quality and integrated service to you. Visit our website to learn more. 

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Prematurity: the preschool years

Thursday, May 12, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Prematurity is a growing medical concern that has serious and predictable effects on child development.  2015 research by the March of dimes shows that one in ten babies is born prematurely in the United States, with Charlotte and North Carolina ranking average in comparison with other places.  

A baseline evaluation and ongoing assessment of children born prematurely can identify challenge areas and guide a proactive plan for a child to develop the necessary skills to be successful at every age. 

There are a number of ways that prematurity can affect children in the early stages of growth, especially during the preschool years.   

  • Mild delays in gross motor skills make it difficult for children to keep up with peers as academic and physical demands increase  
  • These children may demonstrate poor safety awareness during motor activities, appear clumsy with frequent falls and display immature running, jumping and balance
  • Kids may get behind in age-appropriate social skills, speech intelligibility or vocabulary organization and understanding of contingent behavior, i.e. consequences

Our multidisciplinary team recommends that all children born prematurely be assessed for developmental skills and educational readiness during infancy, the preschool years and early school years. Even children who demonstrate typical development during early years remain at risk for delays and may experience significant challenges as they get older.  Early referral and early intervention allows potential problems to be identified and monitored to lessen the impact on academics and other areas.  An early and thorough plan will answer parent's questions, establish a support system and ensure optimal development.   

Child and Family Development has a focus to maximize the potential of every child with a holistic approach to therapy. We believe that a child of any age is connected to his family, his friends and his community and makes a valuable contribution to our world.  For more than 35 years, C&FD has been working closely with children and families, pediatricians, teachers and many others in the community.  Our therapy services include Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Speech Therapy, Education and Psychology. While these are our core areas of expertise, we also work with a child psychiatrist and offer many specialty services. With over 400 years of combined professional experience, our clinical team is the foundation of our success and service.  Our experienced team assists families with a wide variety of concerns and questions. Extended education and training enables us to help many people in extraordinary ways. We work with children and young adults of all ages-- from newborns to college age.  Our mission statement says it all- to provide comprehensive, quality and integrated service to you. Visit our website to learn more. 

Read More

Prematurity: the nursery years

Wednesday, May 11, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Prematurity is a growing medical concern that has serious and predictable effects on child development.  2015 research by the March of dimes shows that one in ten babies is born prematurely in the United States, with Charlotte and North Carolina ranking average in comparison with other places.  

A baseline evaluation and ongoing assessment of children born prematurely can identify challenge areas and guide a proactive plan for a child to develop the necessary skills to be successful at every age. 

There are a number of ways that prematurity can affect children in the early stages of growth, while in the nursery setting.  

  • Little ones may have poor trunk stability, strength and coordination, resulting in delayed rolling, sitting, crawling, walking, talking and hand use
  • Feeding and communication may also be compromised in preterm infants
  • Inefficient breast or bottle feeding may result in poor weight gain and a slowed transition to textured food with a limited diet or picky eating.  There children may also display a decreased amount and variety of babbling and delayed use of single words

Our multidisciplinary team recommends that all children born prematurely be assessed for developmental skills and educational readiness during infancy, the preschool years and early school years.  Even children who demonstrate typical development during early years remain at risk for delays and may experience significant challenges as they get older.  Early referral and early intervention allows potential problems to be identified and monitored to lessen the impact on academics and other areas.  An early and thorough plan will answer parent's questions, establish a support system and ensure optimal development.   

Child and Family Development has a focus to maximize the potential of every child with a holistic approach to therapy. We believe that a child of any age is connected to his family, his friends and his community and makes a valuable contribution to our world.  For more than 35 years, C&FD has been working closely with children and families, pediatricians, teachers and many others in the community.  Our therapy services include Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Speech Therapy, Education and Psychology. While these are our core areas of expertise, we also work with a child psychiatrist and offer many specialty services. With over 400 years of combined professional experience, our clinical team is the foundation of our success and service.  Our experienced team assists families with a wide variety of concerns and questions. Extended education and training enables us to help many people in extraordinary ways. We work with children and young adults of all ages-- from newborns to college age.  Our mission statement says it all- to provide comprehensive, quality and integrated service to you. Visit our website to learn more. 

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must read from ASNC: Surviving Summer with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Monday, May 9, 2016 by Child & Family Development

The Autism Society of North Carolina has republished an excellent resource- written by some of Charlotte's ASMC parent advocates, Nancy Popkin and Kim Tizzard- called "Surviving the Summer with Autism Spectrum Disorder"

According to the post, these expert moms recognize the challenges of summer including: 

  • Change in schedule and routine
  • Sensory challenges
  • Travel
  • Extended family members who don’t understand autism

They have these tested solutions for survival:  

EVERY DAY

  • Build routine into your days (regular waking, eating, etc. times)
  • Make a calendar showing special (and mundane) events
  • Use visual schedules
  • Consider your child’s interests and plan outings that include special interests. 
  • Consider skills to keep fresh (academic) and skills to work on (self-help, daily living) during the summer months.  Build these into the routine of the day.  

DAY TRIPS AND LONGER TRAVEL

  • Visualize exactly what you will be doing with your child with autism.  Consider situations that may entice or present a challenge.  These include sensory concerns (noises, visuals, smells), boundaries or lack there of, temptations or distractions.
  • Call ahead to inquire about above.
  • Communicate with family members ahead of time and explain your child’s needs.  Let them know if you will be bringing any special foods or equipment to help your child feel comfortable.
  • Have accessible/make portable any tools or supplies necessary to assist or assure smooth travels:
    • Schedules
    • Visual Communication Systems
    • Calming Tools
    • Snacks
    • Change of clothes
    • Medications
  • Have an Emergency Plan.  How will you communicate your child’s needs to anyone who may assist?  How will someone identify your child? Carry a picture of your child.
  • Use written social scenarios to help your child visualize new social situations or activities and how to handle them.

Read the full article here to access sample schedule templates, holiday/event-specific ideas and many parent comments.  Add one of your own!

The Child and Family Development multidisciplinary team of therapists endorses these ideas and encourage families to connect with Autism Society in their community.

Read more about our autism services here.   

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pediatric therapist approved: free download and "handy" tips to help children cope

Friday, May 6, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

Child and Family Development pediatric psychologists and occupational therapists enjoy sharing this free downloadable poster from Childhood 101

It is a quick reference and reminder for helping children learn to cope (and may be useful for adults too!). 

The 5 steps to managing big emotions are:

1.  Remind myself that it is never okay to hurt others.

2.  Take 3 deep breaths or count slowly to 10.

3.  Use my words to say how I feel and what I wish would happen. 

4.  Ask for help to solve the problem.

5.  Take time to calm down. 

Whether difficult times are related to behavior, sensory processing or both, these tips are quite "handy"

Read more about our services here

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Topics: Occupational Therapy, Psychology

Ann Guild, speech therapist, celebrates 27 years at C&FD

Thursday, May 5, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Ann Guild 

Ann Guild is our most tenured and more experienced speech therapist.  She is celebrating 27 years at Child and Family Development this month.   

Ann holds a Neuro-Developmental Treatment™ (NDT) certification and a Vital Stim™ certification.  It can be difficult to get her to tout her own expertise but here is how she got started in her speech therapy career: 

I knew in school that I wanted to work with young children.  After graduate school, my real education as a therapist began as I took courses and found mentors in neurodevelopmental treatment (NDT), other oral motor therapies and early language development.  Through teaching workshops and becoming an instructor in the NDTA Certification courses, my understanding of the therapeutic process grew.  My ‘bucket’ of treatment techniques is always growing.  I enjoy teaching others and continue to mentor speech therapists and occupational therapists at C&FD. 

A colleague shares:  

Having known Ann for 27 years now, I am still amazed by her depth of knowledge about and dedication to the most vulnerable and neurologically complex children in the areas of feeding and language.  Her expertise is unsurpassed in our region.  She is a wonderful asset to this practice and a cherished friend.  Congratulations on an amazing career, and I am very glad you have shared so much of it with us.

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Topics: Ann Guild, Speech Therapy

Looking for therapy services in Charlotte?

Wednesday, May 4, 2016 by Child & Family Development

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Topics: Office Locations

National Teachers Day!

Tuesday, May 3, 2016 by Child & Family Development

May 3 is National Teachers Day and we are celebrating our team.  

  • Marie Arrington MAT
  • Jessica DeLing MEd
  • Mary "Mo" Froneberger MAT

Educators help students achieve academic success and become independent, life-long learners. 

Educational specialists have a unique role at Child & Family Development.  They work closely with psychologists and other developmental therapists to understand the learning styles and needs of school-aged children, adolescents and young adults during psycho-educational evaluations.  Click here to read more about psycho-educational assessments.  

Our team offers diagnostic educational therapy.  Most clients have weekly appointments, but intensive and consultative sessions are also available.  Several treatment services are available, including:

  • Academic Coaching
  • College Placement, Preparation and Application Process
  • Educational Therapy
  • End-Of-Grade (EOG) Preparation 
  • Organizational Skills 
  • Orton-Gillingham based services 
  • School Placement and Transitions 
  • School Project Support
  • Schoolwork/ Homework Help and Planning 
  • Social Skills Support 
  • Summertime Academic Intensives
  • Tutoring 

All of our educators hold Masters degrees.  They are experienced diagnosticians and have worked in the public schools.  

We help kids, adolescents and young adults with difficulties, including but not limited to:

  • ADHD and other attention difficulties
  • Dyslexia
  • Dysgraphia
  • Learning Differences and Disabilities
  • Non Verbal Learning Disorder

We provide direction and support in determining and meeting the learning needs of every student, from elementary school to the college years. We assist parents in identifying and addressing initial concerns and then developing comprehensive recommendations to move forward, often including Individualized Education Plan (IEP) development with the public school system. Educators also collaborate with schools and community agencies and offer follow-up meetings as parents proceed with their plans. Services can include direct treatment, assessment, consultation and parent advocacy. 

Click here for more information about the educators at Child and Family Development!

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, Education

May is Mental Health Awareness Month!

Monday, May 2, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

May is Mental Health Awareness Month and we are celebrating our team.  

We help kids, adolescents and young adults with difficulties, including but not limited to:

  • ADHD and other attention difficulties
  • Anxiety
  • Developmental disabilities
  • Learning Differences and learning disabilities

MIDTOWN

  • Shavonda Bean LPA
  • Gretchen Hunter PhD
  • Aleks Liss PsyD
  • Devon Redmond PhD

PINEVILLE

  • Amanda Cummings PhD
  • Brandyn Street PsyD
  • Chris Vrabel PhD 

Click here for more information about the psychologists at Child and Family Development!

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Topics: Aleksandra Liss, Gretchen Hunter, Chris Vrabel, Brandyn Street, Devon Redmond, Psychology, Amanda Cummings, Shavonda Bean

May is Better Speech and Hearing Month!

Monday, May 2, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 


May is Better Speech and Hearing Month and we are celebrating with our team.  

MIDTOWN

  • Amy Elder MA CCC-SLP
  • Ann Guild MA CCC-SLP
  • Allison Parker MA CCC-SLP
  • Melinda Schatz MS CCC-SLP

PINEVILLE

  • Kristin Lyman MA CCC-SLP
  • Lisa Peterson MS CCC-SLP
  • Stephanie Tolley MS CCC-SLP 

Click here for more information about the speech therapists at Child and Family Development!

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

 


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Topics: Stephanie Tolley, Allison Parker, Amy Elder, Ann Guild, Melinda Schatz, Speech Therapy, Kristin Lyman, Lisa Peterson