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insights is a helpful blog brought to you by Child & Family Development

Child & Family Development is a multi-disciplinary pediatric clinic serving the needs of Charlotte area children and their families.

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  • MIDTOWN OFFICE
  • 4012 Park Road, Suite 200
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.332.4834
  • PINEVILLE OFFICE
  • 10516 Park Road
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.541.9080

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General
The information contained in this website is intended to provide general educational information and client education on certain topics only and is not intended to offer healthcare/medical advice. This information should not be considered complete and should not be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice from a licensed healthcare professional. Child and Family Development is not liable or responsible for any advice, course of treatment, diagnosis or any other information or services you obtain through this website. If you have, or suspect you have, a health problem you should never disregard medical advice or delay seeking medical attention because of something you have read on this website. Never rely on information on this website in place of seeking professional medical advice. If you have questions about a medical condition or seek advice, see your healthcare professional immediately.

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Links from our website to other websites are provided as a service to help users find appropriate information. Absolutely no responsibility is taken by Child and Family Development or its employees for the accuracy of the information you may receive from any of the referred links. If you have questions about a medical condition or seek medical advice, contact your healthcare professional.

C&FD welcomes Meghan Dooley, occupational therapist

Monday, Feb 8, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 bio_dooley.jpg

Meghan Dooley MS OTR/L, joined the Child and Family Development team this month.      

Meghan is a licensed occupational therapist with experience in pediatric outpatient clinics, schools, hospitals and skilled nursing facilities.  She received her MS from Boston University and has a special interest in feeding therapy.  

She works at the Midtown office.

Welcome Meghan!  

Read more about our occupational therapy services here

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Occupational Therapy, Meghan Dooley

Speech therapist, Amy Elder celebrates 4 years at C&FD

Friday, Feb 5, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Amy Elder, MA CCC-SLP 

  Heading into Superbowl 50 weekend, she likes LUUUUUKE but we are big fans of hers! 

Amy Elder is a speech therapist and clinical team lead at the Midtown office and is celebrating 4 years at Child and Family Development this month. 

With 10 years in practice, Amy brings experience and expertise to her clients each day. Her specialties include:

  • social skills groups for kids ages 2-teens
  • early intervention for children with speech and language delays, such as apraxia and autism
  • language processing disorders
  • augmentative communication

A new member of the speech therapy team shares: 

Amy is an amazing speech therapist with great patience and knowledge for the field.   She has helped me grow as a clinician in the short time I have been already. 

Read More

Topics: Amy Elder, Speech Therapy

Don't Take Our Word For It! Physical therapy for pelvic floor and core improvements.

Thursday, Feb 4, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Gail Fennimore, PT PCS is one of the most experienced and tenured physical therapists at Child  and Family Development.  In addition to her pediatric clinical specialist (PCS) certification, Gail has specialized training in pelvic floor dysfunction training and offers evaluations and treatment for related conditions.      

Recently, one mother expressed how these services benefited her child. She shares... 

When my daughter was 5 years old, she was diagnosed with Tethered Cord Syndrome and had surgery on her spinal cord to relieve pressure on the nerves going to her bladder and causing constant incontinence.  The surgery was successful, however, over the next year she had lasting problems from what we assumed was nerve damage.  The only diagnosis the urologist could give for the remaining incontinence was Overactive Bladder Syndrome and we put her on medication for that.  However, the medicine did not help.  In fact, it made the symptoms worse so we had to take her off of it.  The more I learned about Overactive Bladder Syndrome I did not feel that this was the correct diagnoses for my daughters remaining symptoms.  

After realizing the neurosurgeon and urologist had done all they could do medically, we started searching for other answers and are so blessed to have found Gail Fennimore.  She has helped us realize that the lasting incontinence is largely caused by my daughter not having been able to develop proper use of her pelvic floor and surrounding core muscles for years leading up to the spinal cord surgery. Through physical therapy with Gail, we have seen significant improvement in my daughter's ability to recognize and control her bladder functions.  She has also worked on her core strength, which we didn't even know had also been impacted due to the tethered cord. 

We are very thankful for the services and wealth of knowledge Gail Fennimore has provided, not only to my daughter, but to our entire family!  

Read more about Gail's expertise in pelvic floor dysfunction here.    

Read More

Topics: Physical Therapy, Gail Fennimore, Testimonials

Dyslexia and reading: early intervention

Wednesday, Feb 3, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Our Educators heartily agree with this recommendation from Brett Miller, PhD.  Dr. Miller directs the Reading, Writing, and Related Learning Disabilities Program in the Child Development and Behavior Branch of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and oversees research focused on development of reading and written-language abilities for learners across the lifespan. He spoke recently with National Institute of Health's magazine about dyslexia.

Is there a key to helping people with dyslexia?

Early, systematic, and explicit reading instruction, teaching the link between the written word and its specific sounds, is critical for dyslexia. The written word maps directly onto spoken language. So the challenge is to link the sounds of English, for example, to the specific letters of the alphabet.

How can parents help their children?

Since learning begins at home, the best thing parents can do is to talk with their children and read to them every day. Let them soak in what they're hearing and learn how to converse. This is a great opportunity to bond with your children and helps them build their oral vocabulary and learn the structure of language, which are part of the foundation for reading.

What is the goal?

The goal is to build a foundation for reading and that takes lots of time and practice.

When should special instruction begin?

The earlier the better for children who are struggling to read. Some children need more time to learn, while others do better in smaller groups. So parents should build relationships with their children's teachers and school administrators to advocate for the best possible support.  Early intervention reduces long-term problems. Children who are not improving by the fourth or fifth grade may need continued instructional support on foundational skills of reading in later grades.

Educational specialists have a unique role at Child & Family Development.  They work closely with psychologists and other developmental therapists to understand the learning styles and needs of school-aged children, adolescents and young adults during psycho-educational evaluations.  We help kids, adolescents and young adults with difficulties, including but not limited to:

  • ADHD and other attention difficulties
  • Dyslexia
  • Dysgraphia
  • Learning Differences and Disabilities
  • Non-Verbal Learning Disorder

We provide direction and support in determining and meeting the learning needs of every student, from elementary school to the college years. We assist parents in identifying and addressing initial concerns and then developing comprehensive recommendations to move forward, often including Individualized Education Plan (IEP) development with the public school system. Educators also collaborate with schools and community agencies and offer follow-up meetings as parents proceed with their plans. Services can include direct treatment, assessment, consultation and parent advocacy.

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Arrington, Jessica DeLing, Education

Psychologist, Devon Redmond leads social media workshop on March 1

Monday, Feb 1, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Devon Redmond PhD, a psychologist at the Midtown office, is leading a community presentation at The Fletcher School Rankin Institute on Children & Social Media

This workshop will he helpful to parents who want to help their child navigate the online world safely and appropriately.  Dr. Redmond will review some of the most popular social media sites and explore the misconceptions about social media use by kids.  She will provide practical guidelines and strategies for parents to help their child navigate the online world safely and appropriately.  Other topics will include the prevalence of social media use by children and cyberbullying. 

Date:  March 1, 2016

Time: 7-8:30 PM

Place:  Rankin Room at The Fletcher School

Cost: $10.00

Contact: Laura Hutchinson, lhutchison@thefletcherschool.org, 704-365-4658, ext 1155

Click here to visit the Rankin Institute website for information and registration. 

The psychologists at Child and Family Development offer individual psychotherapy that can address a wide range of difficulties including autism, attention and executive functioning difficulties, mood issues, emotional regulation, anger management, family problems and overall adjustment issues. 

 

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Topics: Devon Redmond, Psychology

Looking for therapy services in the South Park area?

Friday, Jan 29, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Looking for therapy services for children, adolescents and young adults in the (28210) South Park area of Charlotte?

Child and Family Development has two offices close by: 

  • The Midtown office is in Charlotte, located near the Park/Woodlawn intersection, next to Park Road Shopping Center.  It is less than 3 miles from South Park Mall. 
  • The Pineville office (formely South Charlotte) is in Pineville, located next to Carolinas Medical Center. It is about 5 miles from South Park Mall. 

Both of our offices are about 7000 square feet of space and includes private therapy rooms as well as a large open gym. We have comfortable and warm space and necessary equipment including computer based programs, a trampoline, swings and much, much more.  

Our multi-disciplinary clinic has been helping children and families since 1980. The team of experienced therapists can assess and treat a wide range of childhood concerns, including autism, ADHD, dyslexia, and other learning disabilities or special needs.  Multi-disciplinary services include Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy and Speech Therapy, as well as Educational and Psychological assessment and support.

We participate in many insurance plans.

The Contact Us tab on our website will link you to our address and a map. 

Sign up for C&FD News

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Topics: Office Locations

Occupational therapist, Kati Berlin snuggles up to weighted blankets

Thursday, Jan 28, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Kati Berlin MS OTR/L, occupational therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, enjoyed this information about weighted blankets.  The article provides a good explanation of why this type of sensory input is helpful, who can benefit from one, how to get and use a blanket, as well as the importance of sleep.  

Kati especially appreciates the nod to Temple Grandin, a pioneer in sensory processing and autism and the suggestions on using a weighted blanket.  

Click here for the full article.  

An occupational therapy evaluation will provide standardized and normed data that highlight a person's sensory processing preferences and difficulties across all senses. Call us to get started with a free phone intake. 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Kati Berlin, Occupational Therapy

Speech therapist, Kristin Lyman offers help to children with echolalia

Wednesday, Jan 27, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

Kristin Lyman MA CCC-SLP is a speech therapist at Child and Family Development and works at our Pineville office.  She works with several children who are echolalic.  Recently, she discovered a helpful online resource call Teach Me To Talk, including an article that provides a simple definition and some strategies to support these kids.  

Echolalia is the repeating or “echoing” what another person has said. Children who are echolalic imitate what they have heard someone say in everyday life, lines they’ve listened to from a book, lyrics to a song, or a script from a show or movie. Professionals most often characterize children as echolalic when many of the words or phrases a child uses seem to be repetitions from a previous activity rather than new utterances a child comes up with on their own.   

Kristin emphasizes these strategies for parents and caregivers: 

  • Pay attention to your child's echolalia to determine what skills he is having difficulty with comprehension  For example, if your child is repeating questions that you ask (child asks 'Do you want to go outside?' when he wants to go outside, the child is lacking the ability to initiate requests). 
  • Model the types of phrases or sentences that your child would appropriately say in your daily routines  and keep language simple.  A child who is echolalic is having difficulty understanding and processing individual words.  By keeping your statements short and sweet, this decreases the demand on the child and allows them a better opportunity to understand and engage with you. 
  • Never underestimate the power of visuals.  This article doesn't put much emphasis on this, but giving visual support with real-life objects or pictures when working on making requests is essential.  This helps the child understand what you are asking and  it gives him the opportunity to use nonverbal communication (pointing, reaching).  Then, you know what they want and model how to make a verbal request (I want the ball, Ball please, etc.).   If you determine what your child wants, you can model the verbal request, reward the child for a verbal request and increase his motivation to request this way next time. 

Read full online post for more information and examples here.       

All of our speech therapists are trained to help kids and teens improve expressive and receptive language skills in individual and group sessions.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist  

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Topics: Speech Therapy, Kristin Lyman

Physical therapist, Gail Fennimore celebrates 22+ years at C&FD

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Gail Fennimore, PT PCS 

team_fennimore_2016.jpg

Gail Fennimore is a physical therapist at the Midtown office and is celebrating 22+ years at Child and Family Development this month. 

She is one of the most tenured and experienced therapists on the team and the only certified Pediatric Specialist. Her specialties include neurodevelopmental treatment™ (NDT), pelvic floor dysfunction and serial casting.

A fellow PT shares: 

Gail is one of the most knowledgeable clinicians I have had the pleasure of working with.  She is always willing to share her knowledge and experiences with the people around her. She is kind and patient with everyone she interacts with and is just an overall pleasure to be around.  Gail is the best! 

Gail is truly one-of-a-kind (just like a snowflake) and a valuable part of our multidisciplinary team! 

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Topics: Physical Therapy, Gail Fennimore

Occupational therapist, Courtney Stanley, shares info on clothing and sensory processing

Monday, Jan 25, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Courtney Stanley MS OTR/L, occupational therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, enjoyed this information about clothing sensitivity that people with sensory processing difficulties sometimes experience.  The article is posted on Understood,  an organization dedicated to supporting parents of the one in five children with learning and attention issues.   

Lexi Walters Wright provides 6 suggestions for selecting clothing for kids to reduce the tactile issues: 

  1. super soft materials 
  2. natural fibers
  3. items without tags and seams 
  4. garments without tricky fasteners
  5. clothes that won't bunch up
  6. heavy clothing that provides input 

Courtney's take: 

You know those days when you just can’t get comfortable in anything you wear- when a pair of your most worn jeans and your oldest sweatshirt are the only things that seem to fit or feel good?  When your body is sensitive to touch, clothing can be an absolute nightmare everyday.  This article provides some helpful tips to help make clothing a little less of a nightmare.  Her tips include:

  • Shopping at consignment stores for pre-worn clothing ensures that the clothing is soft. 
  • If the clothes are new, make sure you wash and dry them prior to wearing, throw in a dryer ball to help them get even softer in the dryer. 
  • Boxer briefs and sports bras ensure that clothing stays in place when wearing undergarments is a necessity. 
  • Weighted or pressure clothing can also give that gentle squeeze throughout the day that many children who are tactile defensive need.  Wearing Under Armor (R) or other tightly fitted athletic clothing under clothing is a great way to give that gentle pressure and make the outer clothing more comfortable. 
  • Check out theses websites that are geared to providing clothing that is sensory friendly such as tagless, seamless, and cotton fabrics including www.smarknitkids.com, www.kozieclothes.com, and www.funandfunction.com

Click here for the full article.  

An occupational therapy evaluation will provide standardized and normed data that highlight a person's sensory processing preferences and difficulties across all senses. Call us to get started with a free phone intake. 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Courtney Stanley, Occupational Therapy

Autism Spectrum Disorder Conference on April 22, 2016

Friday, Jan 22, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Partnering with Charlotte Area Health Education Center (AHEC), Child and Family Development is pleased to announce: 

Autism Spectrum Disorder Conference: A Multidisciplinary Review of Current Research and Interventions

Time: Friday, April 22nd, 2016, 9-4:30

Participants:  Parents and professionals including case managers, social workers, psychologists, psychiatrists, counselors, educators, school personnel, nurses, health/ human service practitioners, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists and other health care professionals.

Presenter: Dr. Gary Mesibov, a renowned expert will share the latest about Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), followed by topic-focused sessions led by staff at Child and Family Development.

Objectives: Through new perspectives and intervention possibilities, participants will gain an understanding of the thinking, learning and understanding in “People with ASD". Participants will become familiar with new research and interventions, and how they are being used and what might be expected in the next few years.

Summary: This day-long conference is focused on understanding the neurological differences that research has identified between people with ASD and typical learners and then adjusting educational, clinical, and community-based programs to more closely match the learning styles and needs of those with ASD. The presentations will describe some of the learning differences that have been identified in people with ASD (referred to as The Culture of Autism) and show how these can be accommodated by making evidence-based appropriate adaptations in how interventions are created and delivered. Emphasis will be on strategies for teaching skills that will be needed to help those with ASD to achieve the highest quality of life possible and also on reviewing new approaches that are on the horizon.

Read more about Dr. Mesibov and the conference:

We look forward to seeing you there! 

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Topics: Autism Spectrum Disorder Conference 2016

Speech therapist uses SOS™ Approach to Feeding with kids and teens

Thursday, Jan 21, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Stephanie Tolley, MS, CCC-SLP, speech therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, is trained in the Sequential Oral Sensory™ (SOS) Approach to Feeding program.   

SOS is a feeding approach for children who have trouble at mealtime.  This approach was founded by a child psychologist, Kay Tommey, PhD and a speech therapist, Erin Ross, PhD, CCC-SLP.  SOS™ may be beneficial in many settings and populations. Parents and caregivers of children who will not eat are faced with a difficult and often puzzling challenge. Because the interplay between weight gain and a child’s experience of food can be complicated, there is rarely an easy solution when a feeding problem arises. The SOS Approach uses a transdisciplinary team approach which assess the “whole child”: organ systems, muscles, sensory development, oral motor, learning and behavior, cognition, nutrition and environment.  SOSfocuses on increasing a child’s comfort level by exploring and learning about the different properties of food and allows a child to interact with food in a playful, non-stressful way, beginning with the ability to tolerate the food in the room and in front of him/her; then moving on to touching, kissing, and eventually tasting and eating foods

Additional information is available on www.spdfoundation.net.

Stephanie approves of this approach because it looks at the whole child in order to assess why a child is not eating or has a very limited diet.  Intervention then begins within a child’s comfort level and kids are allowed to explore and learn about food in a non-threatening way through play.  

If your child is a very picky eater or has a highly limited diet, consider scheduling a free phone Intake with one of the 5 SOS™ trained speech therapists or occupational therapists at Child and Family Development to determine if an evaluation is recommended.

Read more about our SOS services here

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

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Topics: Stephanie Tolley, Speech Therapy

What is a Child and Family Development psychoeducational evaluation?

Wednesday, Jan 20, 2016 by Child & Family Development

   

WHAT IS A PSYCHO-EDUCATIONAL EVALUATION? 

The Child and Family Development model of a comprehensive psychoeducational evaluation includes a psychologist and an educator, working together as a diagnostic team.

A typical battery of psychological tests assesses cognitive domains (e.g., attention, language, memory, visual processing, reasoning ability, speed, and fine-motor skills), and social/emotional functioning.  The parents are given a selection of behavioral questionnaires at the time of intake which they and the primary teacher complete and return to the psychologist. These measures assess social and behavioral functioning and gather information about the child’s performance in multiple environments on a daily basis.

The Educational Specialist will assess academic achievement (e.g., reading, writing, math), as well as visual motor functioning (e.g., handwriting), phonological processing abilities, and organization skills necessary for performing academic tasks. Educational Specialists have received schooling and advanced training in administering educational evaluations, interpreting data diagnostically, and developing and implementing educational treatment plans. Educational Specialists have expertise in the treatment of learning disabilities and academic interventions. They are well connected with the educational resources of our community. Perhaps one of their most unique qualifications is that they are experienced in working collaboratively with schools and are knowledgeable about the rules and regulations that govern services, such as IEP, within the school system.

A comprehensive evaluation integrates this information at the Interpretive Parent Conference, and parents report that this is one of the most valuable components of this process. It provides a time to collaborate and talk about what we’ve learned about your child and gain your perspective in our observations and data analysis. This is invaluable in presenting a comprehensive understanding of the ‘whole’ child.

WHY IS THIS COMPREHENSIVE EVALUATION BENEFICIAL AND NECESSARY? 

Both psychological and educational data must be gathered in order to provide the following:

  • diagnostic clarification for a variety of conditions (e.g., ADHD, dyslexia)
  • targeted treatment interventions for specific areas of weakness
  • providing documentation for the purpose of receiving accommodations in school settings or for standardized tests (e.g., SAT)
  • meeting admissions criteria for private schools or specialized programs

Private evaluations are designed to provide high quality clinical services to ensure that children are able to reach their highest potential. This differs from the kinds of evaluations and services that are available through special education supports at local public schools. Public schools are able to provide high quality evaluations to students that meet formalized eligibility requirements, and these students typically must have a history learning deficits which are negatively impacting their ability to meet grade-level expectations. Children who are typically referred for a private evaluation may not meet those eligibility requirements (e.g., “flying under the radar”), but nonetheless are in need of support and intervention. 

We offer TESTING in the following areas: 

  • Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) 
  • Psycho-Educational (ADHD, IQ, Learning Disabilities)
  • Social-Emotional Behavioral Adjustment
  • School Readiness 
  • College Accommodations
  • Young Adult Developmental Disability

Our TWO OFFICES are conveniently located in:

  • Midtown (across from Park Road Shopping Center) in Charlotte 
  • Pineville (near CMC-Pineville)

The TEAM of 7 psychologists and 3 educators is accepting new referrals. There is no waiting list for services.  Generally, we are scheduling appointments within 1-4 weeks of the initial call.

We will file to many insurance plans for the psychological services, on an in-network or out-of-network basis.  

Contact our office to get started (704-541-9080) or visit our website to get started.  Learn more about psycho-educational evaluations here.  

GET STARTED NOW

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Topics: Education, Psychology

Orton-Gillingham and developmental stages of reading

Tuesday, Jan 19, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

 

Marie Pacini Arrington, MAT and the other educators at Child and Family Development regularly assess and treat children, teens and young adults with concerns about reading.       

Marie is a certified Orton-Gillingham provider for grades K-12.  Orton-Gillingham is a methodology of reading instruction for people with dyslexia developed by a neurologist, an educator/ psychologist.  According to their website, Institute for Multi-Sensory Education, this theory combines multi-sensory techniques along with the structure of the English language. Those items taught include phonemes and morphemes, such as prefixes, suffixes, and roots and common spelling rules.  Multi-sensory education incorporates the three learning pathways, which are: auditory, kinesthetic, and visual. 

A recent article in a professional journal describes Chall's stages of reading development, including: 

1. Pre-reading Birth to Kindergarten: At this stage, young children can listen to stories read to them. Many three year olds pretend to read by mimicking adults flipping through books. By ages four and five, children can point to words and pictures when asked. When children enter Kindergarten many can recite the alphabet, recognize written letters and write their own names.

2. Reading and Decoding Grades 1 and 2: During these early years of school, students gain phonemic awareness—or learn to associate letters with their corresponding sounds. At this level, readers often focus on individual words.

3. Fluency Grades 2 and 3; Children become fluent at recognizing words with less effort. Through repeated readings of familiar stories, children begin to associate printed words with stories they know and understand.

4. Reading for New Learning Grades 4-8; By developing the skills associated with fluency, students can now move on to unfamiliar texts and focus on meaning. In this way, reading develops into a means of gaining new information. Fourth graders typically begin to use these skills across subjects in science, math, history and geography.

5. Develop Multiple Viewpoints High School; These readers have developed to the point where they can appreciate works arguing different points of view. They can also decide how quickly or slowly to read, whether to skim or closely study a text. Ideally, students at this level are reading both for learning and enjoyment.

6. Construction and Reconstruction College and adulthood; Mature readers can read multiple texts and assimilate information to form their own understanding. Perhaps most important of all: readers at this level know what to read versus what not to read as a means of efficiently meeting the goals of their reading.

Marie notes that we are continuing to expand on our reading achievement at all stages of development. We are never done learning and ultimately we are never done with improving our reading skills.

Our 3 Educational Specialists can assist your child in progressing at the appropriate pace and becoming strong readers.  They assist parents in identifying and addressing initial concerns and then developing comprehensive recommendations to move forward, often including Individualized Education Plan (IEP) development with the public school system. Educators also collaborate with schools and community agencies and offer follow-up meetings as parents proceed with their plans. Services can include tutoring, academic coaching, assessment, consultation and parent advocacy.

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Topics: Marie Arrington, Education

Child and Family Development celebrates 5 years with occupational therapist, Jessica Hoffarth

Monday, Jan 18, 2016 by Child & Family Development

  Happy C&FD Anniversary to Jessica Hoffarth, MS OTR/L 

Jessica Hoffarth is an occupational therapist at the Midtown office and is celebrating five years at Child and Family Development this month. 

Her specialties include Cranio-Sacral Treatment, Hand Therapy, Kinesiotaping, Neuro-Developmental Treatment™ (NDT), Pediatric Feeding and Swallowing Disorders, Saebo Arm Training Program®Sensory Integration (SI), Therapeutic Ultrasound and Electrical Stimulation and Total Motion Release® (TMR).     

A fellow OT shares: 

Jessica Hoffarth is one smart cookie!  She is dedicated to research and evidence based practice which leads to better outcomes for her patients.  As an excellent problem solver, she really knows how to look at a problem, figure out the cause and address it.  That’s essential in this job, where we frequently see children that can’t be “figured out”!

She is an awesome part of our multidisciplinary team! 

 

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Topics: Jessica Hoffarth, Occupational Therapy

Physical therapist, Jessica Cornman, completes Theratog course

Friday, Jan 15, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Physical therapist, Jessica Cornman DPT is now a certified TheraTog fitter.  

TheraTogs™ are FDA-registered Class I medical devices.  According to their website, TheraTogs™ are orthotic garment systems designed to provide gentle, prolonged muscle stretch and alignment guidance that replicates the manual positioning and supervised therapy that the rehab clinician offers in a typical session.  The clinician uses TheraTogs™ to extend the benefits of this all-too-short (and probably too infrequent) rehab session into the client’s daylong activities – and the client gains thousands of additional repetitions in corrected functional alignment or postural position. The biomechanical or sensorimotor principles behind a TheraTogs garment-and-strapping application are thus the same principles that supported the therapy session that preceded it. TheraTogs serves as “body training underwear” that is customized by the clinician for the wearer’s specific needs.  In short: 

Therapeutic principles/protocols expressed via garments + strapping = Wearable Therapy

Jessica shares, "I found the course very beneficial in developing a greater variety of treatment strategies for both torso and postural impairments as well as for developing a greater variety of strategies for lower extremity in-toeing and out-toeing."   

The Child and Family Development physical therapy team of 6 providers offers free phone intakes and screens.  

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

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Topics: Physical Therapy, Jessica Cornman

Occupational therapist, Jessica Hoffarth recommends free download

Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Jessica Hoffarth MS OTR/L, occupational therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, likes this free download from Understood,  an organization dedicated to supporting parents of the one in five children with learning and attention issues. The author, Amanda Morin, recently posted a series of worksheets that focus on one's abilities.  

Ms. Morin shares that when your child has learning and attention issues, you may sometimes be so focused on what your child needs to improve that it can be hard to see strengths.  This activity is a cool and and crafty way to identify your child’s many strengths and connect them in a paper chain.

Jessica loves the worksheet that identifies strengths.  She shares:

I talk with parents here a lot about how it’s just hard as a parent to step back and look at your child and instead of thinking “I know you are capable of this, why are you just not doing it?” (adult is focused on the task) we need to think “Okay, you are capable, so why isn’t this working for you right now?” (seeing that the child is focused on something besides the task). 

These days, we are so busy in our day to day lives that it’s very easy to get caught up in getting everything done, accomplished, and learned; and it’s easy to miss really seeing the little people we are raising.  This activity helps us as parents be able to focus on our little people and celebrate them for who they are, not just what they have achieved that we can measure.  It helps us see them how they see themselves, that’s extremely important; it’s where you find the answer to “you’re capable, why isn’t this working for you today?” (it helps us know what they’re actually focused on and feeling and thinking about).  It’s about how they feel and how they see things.  So any activity that helps us to see that in our kids is great.

Click here for the download and more information. 

An occupational therapy evaluation will provide standardized and normed data that highlight a child's strengths and weaknesses.  Call us to get started with a free phone intake. 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Jessica Hoffarth, Occupational Therapy

What is Executive Functioning?

Wednesday, Jan 13, 2016 by Child & Family Development

 

Jessica DeLing, M.Ed. and the other educators at Child and Family Development regularly assess and treat children, teens and young adults with concerns about executive functioning.   

The first question is often "What is it?".  Executive Functioning skills involve…”high-level cognitive functions…that help us to decide what activities or task we will pay attention to and which ones we will choose to do…they allow us to organize behavior over time and override immediate demands in favor of longer-term goals…allow us to plan and organize activities, sustain attention, and persist to complete a task…allow us to manage our emotions and monitor our thoughts in order to work more efficiently and effectively.” (Dawson & Guare, 2010)

Next, we answer what skills are related to executive functioning.  Some examples are: 

  • Impulse Control
  • Emotional Control
  • Planning & Prioritizing
  • Flexibility
  • Working Memory
  • Self-Monitoring
  • Task Initiation
  • Organization
  • Time Management
  • Attention
  • Goal Directed Persistence

People use their executive functioning skills constantly.  Consider how these skills impact us throughout their day.

  • At home: keeping rooms organized, daily routines, following multi-step directions
  • In school: managing assignments, remembering materials, turning in work, following directions
  • With peers: taking turns, making and keeping plans, flexibility 

Our 3 Educational Specialists provide direction and support in determining and meeting the learning needs of every student, from elementary school to the college years. We assist parents in identifying and addressing initial concerns and then developing comprehensive recommendations to move forward, often including Individualized Education Plan (IEP) development with the public school system. Educators also collaborate with schools and community agencies and offer follow-up meetings as parents proceed with their plans. Services can include tutoring, academic coaching, assessment, consultation and parent advocacy.

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Topics: Jessica DeLing, Education

Physical therapy and chronic pain in children and teens

Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 by Child & Family Development

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Topics: Physical Therapy, Erin Harkins

Free seminar: Get Ready For School

Monday, Jan 11, 2016 by Child & Family Development

Our next free seminar: Get Ready For School

Is your child ready for school, both academically and socially?  Join our experts to review what skills are necessary for a child to succeed in school and what you can do now to prepare.  Topics will include:

  • Milestones and activities in various developmental areas, such as motor/sensory, language, social/ emotional and cognition/general knowledge
  • NC Law and admissions to kindergarten
  • Trends and expectations
  • What to do if you are worried 

Mary "Mo" Froneberger, MAT Educational Specialist and Marion Wilm, C/NDT OTR/L Occupational Therapist will bring decades of experience in child development, learning and schools.

Event Details: 

Tuesday, February 16, 2016 

6:15-7:15 PM 

Child and Family Development- Pineville office

10516 Park Road

Charlotte, NC  28210

Click here for a printable event poster. 

Space is limited so RSVP to reserve your spot here or visit our website home page and click the REGISTER FREE SEMINARS button. 

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Topics: Marion Wilm, Mary Froneberger, Occupational Therapy, Education, seminars