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Child & Family Development is a multi-disciplinary pediatric clinic serving the needs of Charlotte area children and their families.

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  • MIDTOWN OFFICE
  • 4012 Park Road, Suite 200
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.332.4834
  • PINEVILLE OFFICE
  • 10516 Park Road
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.541.9080

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General
The information contained in this website is intended to provide general educational information and client education on certain topics only and is not intended to offer healthcare/medical advice. This information should not be considered complete and should not be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice from a licensed healthcare professional. Child and Family Development is not liable or responsible for any advice, course of treatment, diagnosis or any other information or services you obtain through this website. If you have, or suspect you have, a health problem you should never disregard medical advice or delay seeking medical attention because of something you have read on this website. Never rely on information on this website in place of seeking professional medical advice. If you have questions about a medical condition or seek advice, see your healthcare professional immediately.

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Links from our website to other websites are provided as a service to help users find appropriate information. Absolutely no responsibility is taken by Child and Family Development or its employees for the accuracy of the information you may receive from any of the referred links. If you have questions about a medical condition or seek medical advice, contact your healthcare professional.

Preparing students with ADHD and LD for College

Monday, Apr 27, 2015 by Child & Family Development

  • Are in college and struggling to get your feet grounded with less guidance and support from parents?
  • Have you been accepted into college program and want to learn ways to make the transition from high school?

Our Educators regularly helps teens and young adults with attention difficulties and learning differences. 

Marie, Mo and Jessica often recommend a wonderful resource for helping students transition into the wonderful yet very scary world of college: Ready for Take-Off: Preparing Your Teen with ADHD and LD for College by Theresa Laurie Maitland, Ph.D. & Patricia Quinn, MD. 

bookADHD

Ideally, we suggest that families read this book during the high school years and use some strategies as they plan for and implement this transition into college.

Other resources to learn self-advocacy and study skills can be found on ADD Warehouse or working with a professional.  We work with students in high school and college on preparing for and dealing with the transition to college as well as everything it brings with it. 

 

 

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Pacini, Jessica DeLing

Happy C&FD Anniversary to Christy Gannon, Practice Manager

Friday, Apr 24, 2015 by Child & Family Development

 IMG_5221

Christy Gannon is marking 3 years of tenure this month! She is the Practice Manager and is involved with most every part of Child and Family Development.

Christy works “behind the scenes” to uphold our comprehensive and integrated approach to serving our clients. On any given day, she can manage referrals, help with a software issue, or assist the administrative team.  No doubt about it, the days are interesting and go by quickly!

She thinks C&FD is a fun and casual environment and enjoys listening to the sights and sounds of pediatric therapy while she works. Nothing beats the encouraging words and laughter throughout our office.

Happy C&FD Anniversary!

 

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Communicating with a Nonverbal Child: a Speech Therapy review

Thursday, Apr 23, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Allison Parker, MS CCC-SLP, speech therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, recently reviewed an article related to autism and the nonverbal child.      

The article from Friendship Circle offers tips on how to facilitate communication, including: 

1. Enter into their world by using motivating people, items, etc. to encourage communication

2. Label feelings as they occur

3. Assume competence

4. Model Language and use Aided Language Stimulation

5. Use a total communication approach using both unaided and aided communication

Allison shares that one of the biggest ways to encourage children to communicate is finding what motivates them and using a total communication approach. If a child is motivated by bubbles, using a picture of bubbles, signing for “more”, and pointing are all great ways to communicate. Pictures, gestures, and signs paired with words will not take away from the speech component, which is the ultimate goal. It will only increase communication and make it more effective. It’s also important for parents and caregivers to model language to the child as it increases the child’s receptive language and will eventually increase expressive language as well. 

Our team of 9 licensed speech therapists, rather than assistants or aides, is available to share their expertise.  We are in-network with many insurance plans, including Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield NC, Cigna, Medcost, North Carolina Medicaid, Primary Physician Care and United Health Care.  Our clients also may pay privately and access out-of-network benefits.

 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist   

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Topics: Allison Parker

Brandyn Street, psychologist and autism expert shares top recommendations

Wednesday, Apr 22, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Brandyn Street, Ph.D. is a psychologist at Child and Family Development and an expert in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). 

During Autism Awareness Month, Dr. Street shares some of her top recommendations that are specific to a child’s developmental stage.  

EARLY CHILDHOOD

  • Right from the Start: Behavioral Intervention for Young Children with Autism by Sandra Harris and Mary Jane Weiss
  • Play to Talk: A Practical Guide to Help Your Late-Talking Child Join the Conversation by James MacDonald

SCHOOL AGE

  • You are a Social Detective: Explaining Social Thinking to Kids by Michelle Garcia Winner, Pamela Crooke and Kelly Knopp
  • Navigating the Social World: A Curriculum for Individuals with Asperger's Syndrome, High Functioning Autism and Related Disorders by Jeanette McAfee

ADOLESCENCE AND YOUNG ADULTHOOD

  • Social Skills Picture Book for High School and Beyond by Jed Baker
  • Preparing for Life: The Complete Guide for Transitioning to Adulthood for Those with Autism by Jed Baker

Read more about our autism testing services here.  

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Topics: Brandyn Street

Learning to read with Orton-Gillingham system

Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 by Child & Family Development


Recently Marie Pacini, MAT, educational specialist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, expanded her Orton-Gillingham training. 

Features of Orton-Gillingham:

  • an intensive, sequential phonics-based system teaches the basics of word formation before whole meanings.
  • accommodates and utilizes the three learning modalities through which people learn
    • visual
    • auditory
    • kinesthetic
  • flexiblity to allow for individual learning style

Marie plans to use this system in her tutoring and academic coaching sessions. This summer, she offers small group intensives on reading and other subjects.  

Click here to read more about educational services available. 

 

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Topics: Marie Pacini

Don't Take Our Word For It: a swimmer's tale for a Physical Therapist

Monday, Apr 20, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Just back from Spring Break in Orlando, one of our teen-aged Physical Therapy clients shared this wonderful story:

With Child and Family Development, "Olive" participates in aquatic therapy at the Harris YMCA and has regular land-based sessions too.

Earlier this month, her family visited Discovery Cove and swam with the dolphins. One dolphin named Winter has a prosthetic tail. Winter practices with the tail every day and has improved her coordination and aglility in the water.  "Olive" could not help but compare her own PT work and progress to that of Winter.  She adds that while she enjoys the pool, she is glad she doesn't have the same daily schedule as the dolphin. 

Read more about aquatic therapy services on our blog.  

 

 

                Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist    

 

 

 

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Topics: Jessica Sapel

Executive Functioning Summer Groups

Friday, Apr 17, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Make time for some learning this summer!

Our Educational Specialists are offering intensive summer groups for kids with executive functioing difficulities, ased on specific grade levels.  Programs are based on rising grade levels in Fall 2015. 

Kids can benefit from just one program or a series of programs over time. 

Individual one-on-one educational intensives are also available.

WHAT IS EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONING? 

Executive functioning is a term you might have heard in connection with attention and learning related challenges. It is a broad construct that encompasses many different aspects of cognition and behavior. Broadly speaking, the term refers to a collection of higher-level cognitive abilities that allow us to execute a task. There are executive skills that involve thinking, such as holding incoming information in mind, planning, prioritizing, organizing, and time management. There are also executive functions that involve behavior or doing, such as stopping oneself from responding automatically, controlling an emotional response, starting a task, sticking with a task, and flexibly switching from one task or idea to another. Most individuals have a wide range of executive skill strengths and weaknesses and knowing a child's specific strengths and weaknesses can often be helpful in figuring out where support is needed. It is also often helpful to consider your own executive functioning, to see if there is room for improvement on that end, as well. Research suggests that disorders in executive functioning can run in families.

There are a variety of red flags that could indicate that your child is struggling with executive functioning and could benefit from support. Executive functions are related to what teachers commonly refer to as ‘study skills.' Parents of children with executive dysfunction often express concern that their child does not know how to study. They can learn the material; they just do not know how to learn the material on their own. They can do the assignment, they just cannot remember to bring it to school or hand it to the teacher. Long term projects are often very challenging for children with executive dysfunction because of the planning, prioritizing, and organization required for these projects. Kids with executive dysfunction are often said to have "no sense of time." Written expression is often particularly challenging for these children because writing demands a high level of organization, sequencing, planning, and perseverance. Parents also observe that multi-tasking is nearly impossible, as children with weaknesses in this area often are easily distractible and have difficulty managing several things in mind at one time. They may have difficulty following routines or following multi-step commands. Some children have trouble getting started on tasks independently and seem to get "stuck" during times of transition. It is often helpful for parents to watch their children's emotional and behavioral reactions to certain tasks. The child may be more apt to avoid a task that challenges them. Think about the task demands and consider whether your child has the capacity to do it. Note that even if the child can do the task sometimes, this does not imply that it is laziness or defiance. Inconsistency and variability of performance is often an indicator of executive dysfunction. If they were previously successful, try to pinpoint why. Evaluate your child's self-efficacy, their beliefs about their own likelihood of success and mastery. 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS

Executive Functioning Skills (Elementary): August 3rd – 6th

Grades 3-5:               9:00–10:00

  • Using research based practices, students will engage in interactive and fun activities that teach and promote age appropriate executive functioning skills.  By creating an awareness of executive skills across various settings and providing opportunities to practice those skills.  Students will learn strategies to support life-long learning.

Executive Functioning Skills (Middle School/High School): August 10th – 13th

Grades 6-8:               9:00–10:00

Grades 9-12:             1:00–2:00

  • Students will be supported and encouraged as they learn strategies for strengthening their executive functioning skills.  Using research based practices and interactive lessons, middle and high school students will reflect on their personal learning styles and learn to apply various strategies in a meaningful way. 

SCHEDULING 

All group programs include 4 sessions in 1 week, Monday-Thursday.  A minimum of 3 participants will be assigned to each group.

Students may benefit from participating in multiple programs over the summer.  Additional groups may be scheduled based on interest and availability. 

Individual one-on-one educational intensives are also available.

COST 

Group program fees of $200.00 are due at the time of registration.  

CONTACTS

Jessica DeLing, M.Ed., Educational Specialist

jdeling@childandfamilydevelopment.com704-332-4834  ext.123

 

Mary “Mo” Froneberger, MAT, Educational Specialist 

mfroneberger@childandfamilydevelopment.com704-541-9080  ext. 219

 

Marie Pacini, MAT, NBCT, Educational Specialist 

mpacini@childandfamilydevelopment.com; 704-541-9080 ext. 218    

 

 

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Pacini, Jessica DeLing

Don't Take Our Word For It: a mom grateful for speech therapy

Thursday, Apr 16, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Whether child psychology or physical therapy, all of the 33 pediatric therapists at Child and Family Development pursued helping professions to make a difference in people's lives. 

When parents recognize improvements in their kids and share it with us, we are happy! Recently, a mother writes: 

We are very grateful for everyone’s help and concern. I feel confident that when our son begins really vocalizing, it will be because of the time spent with speech therapist Amy Gossett.  The future looks so bright because of your services! Thank you!” 

Read more of Amy's rave reviews on our blog.  

 

 

 

 

 

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Topics: Amy Gossett

Devon Redmond, psychologist and autism expert

Wednesday, Apr 15, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Devon Redmond, Ph.D. is a psychologist at Child and Family Development and an expert in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). 

During Autism Awareness Month, Dr. Redmond shares some of what motivates her work:

"I enjoy working with individuals on the spectrum from early childhood through adulthood, from the first diagnosis and early intervention, to leading young adult social groups where we talk about current events, pop culture, and issues facing young adults today. 

I love that we learn more and more about autism everyday, and that it’s becoming common knowledge that individuals on the spectrum, just like neurotypicals, have unique perspectives, insights, and experiences that make the world a better and more interesting place to live."    

Read more about our autism testing services here.  

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Topics: Devon Redmond

Could it be Autism?

Tuesday, Apr 14, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Three psychologists at Child and Family Development are experts in autism spectrum disorder (ASD):

  • Devon Redmond, Ph.D.
  • Brandyn Street, Ph.D.
  • Chris Vrabel, Psy.D.

Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) often present with:

  • social communication difficulties
  • poor social interactions 
  • restricted interests and/or repetitive behaviors

This can include difficulty with back-and-forth conversations or joint play, poor use of eye contact, difficulty maintaining age-appropriate friendships, as well as unusual interests, repetitive behaviors or excessive adherence to routines.

Our psychologists provide comprehensive and timely assessment and treatment for families seeking a diagnosis and support. 

  • Our evaluations begin with a parent interview
  • Diagnostics include intellectual testing, formal assessment of social and communication skills (using a test such as the ADOS-2) and behavioral questionnaires that are completed by parents and teachers.
  • During the Interpretive Parent Conference, the results are reviewed and recommendations for therapy, school or community interventions are shared. 
  • A written report follows in about 4 weeks.

There is no waiting list for services. 

We will file to many insurance plans on an in-network or out-of-network basis. 

Read more about our autism testing services here.  

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Topics: Chris Vrabel, Brandyn Street, Devon Redmond

Social skills groups help kids with autism

Monday, Apr 13, 2015 by Child & Family Development

April is Autism Awareness Month and we are celebrating by sharing information about some of our related services, like social skills groups.  

Michelle Pentz MS CCC-SLP, speech therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, found an article in the American Speech Language Hearing Association Leader called "Building A Science Of Friendship" by Belinda Williams that supports the social skills group that she offers here at Child and Family Development with occupational therapist, Courtney Stanley, MS, OTR/L. Sometimes, these groups include kids with autism and other developmental disorders.  

The article emphasizes measuring the changes you see in group participants and ensuring carryover of social skills outside of the session. Pediatric therapists should provide regular feedback to parents and caregivers so kids can practice their developing skills between sessions.  

In our Social Butterflies™ social skills camps, Michelle and Courtney provide a list of what skills will be addressed during each session.  Outside of the session, the family is encouraged to initiate conversations for more practice in a familiar setting with familiar people.  Along the way, both therapists and the family can share the accomplishments and challenges.  Many times, this leads to even more customized camps. Families tell us that when they incorporate this practice, big changes occur that transfer from the session, to home, other structured activities, then play dates and beyond.  

Read more about Social Butterflies™ social skills camps at Child and Family Development here

 

 

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Topics: Michelle Pentz, Courtney Stanley

Autism Society of Mecklenburg County promoting #Autism Uniquely You

Sunday, Apr 12, 2015 by Child & Family Development

April is Autism Awareness Month and we are proud to collaborate with the Autism Society of Mecklenburg County and the Autism Society of North Carolina

Here is their latest program: 

Nearly a quarter century ago, the Autism Society launched a nationwide effort to promote autism awareness, inclusion and self-determination for all, and to assure that each person with ASD is provided the opportunity to achieve the highest possible quality of life. This year we want to go beyond simply promoting autism awareness to encouraging everyone to become partners in the movement of creating a world where all people, regardless of diagnosis, are treated with respect and dignity and are appreciated for who they are. Awareness is only one step in our journey. We see clear progression from awareness to action to inclusion and acceptance resulting in appreciation of the value of our differences and the unique gifts we all have to offer--so this year we celebrate April by celebrating Uniquely You.

That’s why this month, we’re launching #AutismUniquelyYou - a month-long social media campaign celebrating self-identity and acceptance and appreciation for how each of us does our part to make the world a better place for autism. #AutismUniquelyYou invites people to share their individuality and reflect on differences in us all. The campaign invites people of all ages* to get creative, paint their hands, make a video or take a picture of the final product, tag it and share it on social media and encourage others to do the same! Visit the Facebook page of the Autism Society of America or your favorite local affiliate and “like us” and consider a donation to support this great campaign. It’s fun and it’s simple - all you need is a camera, paint and your favorite surface to get started. It’s a self-affirming message that people of all ages can get behind. We want everyone to take action and embrace appreciation during National Autism Awareness Month!

How will you celebrate National Autism Awareness Month? Join in the fun and get involved in the following ways:

  • Be Unique. Be You. Create your #AutismUniquelyYou hand-print image, tag it and share it with your social media followers. Invite at least 5 others to join the fun and show their unique style
  • Post the #NAAM15 badge to all of your social media and encourage your family, friends and coworkers to do the same
  • Purchase a totally awesome limited-edition autism awareness shirt from our online store and show your autism pride (there are several styles available but quantities are limited so don’t delay)
  • Attend an autism awareness event in your community - remember to support your local Autism Society affiliate
  • Create a project utilizing the ribbon image, theme or other autism imagery for your audiences and tag us/share with us!
  • Recognize someone who is affected by autism and post your nomination on social media and tag #AutismUniquelyYou so we can share your story.
  • Follow #NAAM15 and #AutismUniquelyYou to join the conversation throughout the month of April

 

The Child and Family Development team of more than 30 therapists provides services to kids with autism including:  Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy and Speech Therapy, as well as Educational and Psychological testing and counseling.  Read about our ASD testing services here

  

 

 

 

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Topics: Chris Vrabel, Brandyn Street, Devon Redmond

TED Talks pick from a psychologist: body language

Friday, Apr 10, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Aleksandra Liss, Psy.D., psychologist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, endorses this TED Talk by Amy Cuddy about body language and its impact on how others see us and how we see ourselves. 

The intro describes "social psychologist Amy Cuddy shows how “power posing” — standing in a posture of confidence, even when we don’t feel confident — can affect testosterone and cortisol levels in the brain, and might even have an impact on our chances for success." 

Dr. Liss believes that it is important for everyone to understand how their behaviors can shape how they feel. One of her favorite “power poses” is the superman pose, however, if you are not ready for that she suggests that you start by just smiling. Research has shown that the behavior of smiling actually makes someone feel happier.  But don’t take our word for it, watch this video and learn what it means to “fake it until you become it.” 

Read more about our counseling services here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 


 

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Topics: Aleksandra Liss

Speech therapist shares tips to encourage language development

Thursday, Apr 9, 2015 by Child & Family Development

The Child and Family Development team of 9 speech therapists love to work with little ones with emerging expressive and receptive language skills.  

 

Often, parents ask what they can do at home to help kids 2 years old and under stay on track with development.  Amy Gossett, MA CCC-SLP shares these 7 easy tips from the HELP® books by Linguisystems.  

 

1.  Talk Talk Talk!  Talk to your child ALOT during everyday activities such as meal time, laundry, and running errands.  Label everything you see in the environment such as toys, foods, vehicles.

2.  Talk about what YOU are doing.  Talk about what YOUR CHILD is doing.  Use short sentences such as “Getting in the car.”  “Drinking some juice.”

3.  Read lots and lots of books with simple pictures.  Talk about what you see, and what the characters are doing.

4.  Listen to your child and accept their attempts at talking.  This is reinforcing the child to keep trying!

5.  Provide opportunities for your child to talk.  Place food/drink/toy items out of reach.  If your child reaches for it, model the language “Eat cookie”  “Drink milk” “play ball.”  Repeat a few times and wait for the child to try.

6.  Expand what your child says.  Repeat what they say and add more.  If your child says “out,” you say “go outside?” 

7.  Repeat, Repeat, Repeat! For example if the child is banging on the door to go outside, but doesn’t say the word “OUT” yet.  Pause before opening it, and model, “out, out, let’s go out.”

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

Read more about our speech therapy services here.  

Visit the Resources tab on our website to access helpful developmental charts. 

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Topics: Amy Gossett

Summertime Aquatic Therapy at the Harris YMCA

Wednesday, Apr 8, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development continues aquatic therapy at the Harris YMCA!

We have offered aquatic therapy for more than 10 years and three physical therapists will be in the water this summer:

Jessica Sapel, LPT, ATRIC
Erin Harkins, DPT, ATRIC
Jessica Braun, DPT 

Pool therapy is a great complement to a physical therapy or occupational therapy intervention, in addition to regular land based therapies. 

  • The aquatic medium provides a number of unique properties that are almost impossible to replicate on land. 
  • The hydrostatic pressure of the water really helps our pediatric patients with body awareness and sensory integration.  Not to mention the undeniable aid with postural support for not only standing, but also for breathing! 
  • The buoyancy aids in off weighting the body to make coordination of activities much easier, as it can be used to lessen the strength required to perform a movement successfully.  Many people learn to walk first in the water and then on land. 
  • The confidence they have in the water is remarkable.  Imagine seeing a 7 year old motor plan and successfully walk for the first time in the water - now that 10 year old is walking independently on land! 

For the last 5 years, we have partnered with the Harris YMCA in Charlotte near South Park Mall.   The indoor pool has several features that are especially therapeutic including:

  • zero tide entrance, like walking into the ocean
  • whirlpool, with variable resistance and pressure 
  • heated water
  • floating equipment and toys

Click here to read more about the benefits of aquatic therapy.  

Read the C&FD blog

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Topics: Jessica Sapel, Erin Harkins, Jessica Braun

Group Education Intensives for Summer

Wednesday, Apr 8, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Make time for some learning this summer!

Our Educational Specialists are offering Intensive Programs based on specific grade levels and subject areas. Programs are based on rising grade levels in Fall 2015. 

Kids can benefit from just one program or a series of programs over time. 

Individual one-on-one educational intensives are also available.

 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS

Kindergarten Readiness: June 22nd- 25th

Pre-K and T-K students:       9:00–10:30

  •         Instruction builds pre-academic skills in reading, writing and math, as well as listening.

Math:  July 6th – 9th

Grades 1-2:               9:00-10:30

Grades 3-5:               1:00-2:30

  • Instruction is based on a multi-sensory approach to learning grade-level specific math skills that align with the Common Core standards.

Basic Reading: July 13th – 16th

Grades 1-2:               9:00–10:30

Grades 3-5:               1:00–2:30

  • Instruction focuses on stimulating and strengthening the underlying processing areas of phonological awareness and memory in order to improve sound awareness, word decoding, spelling, word recognition and reading fluency.

Writing: July 20th – 23rd

Grades 1-2:               9:00–10:30

Grades 3-5:               1:00–2:30

  • Instruction focuses on helping students organize their thinking while executing a written piece. By creating an awareness of the various types of writing, as well as opportunities to plan and interact with various topics.  Students will learn strategies for improving their overall written expression skills.

Reading Comprehension: July 27th – 30th

Grades 1-2:               9:00–10:30

Grades 3-5:               1:00–2:30

  • Instruction focuses on using grade-level appropriate text to improve higher-order thinking skills so students can share main ideas, infer, predict and summarize written and verbal information.

Executive Functioning Skills (Elementary): August 3rd – 6th

Grades 3-5:               9:00–10:00

  • Using research based practices, students will engage in interactive and fun activities that teach and promote age appropriate executive functioning skills.  By creating an awareness of executive skills across various settings and providing opportunities to practice those skills.  Students will learn strategies to support life-long learning.

Executive Functioning Skills (Middle School/High School): August 10th – 13th

Grades 6-8:               9:00–10:00

Grades 9-12:             1:00–2:00

  • Students will be supported and encouraged as they learn strategies for strengthening their executive functioning skills.  Using research based practices and interactive lessons, middle and high school students will reflect on their personal learning styles and learn to apply various strategies in a meaningful way. 

SCHEDULING 

All group programs include 4 sessions in 1 week, Monday-Thursday.  A minimum of 3 participants will be assigned to each group.

Students may benefit from participating in multiple programs over the summer.  Additional groups may be scheduled based on interest and availability. 

Individual one-on-one educational intensives are also available.

COST 

Group program fees of $200.00 are due at the time of registration.  

CONTACTS

Jessica DeLing, M.Ed., Educational Specialist

jdeling@childandfamilydevelopment.com704-332-4834  ext.123

 

Mary “Mo” Froneberger, MAT, Educational Specialist 

mfroneberger@childandfamilydevelopment.com704-541-9080  ext. 219

 

Marie Pacini, MAT, NBCT, Educational Specialist 

mpacini@childandfamilydevelopment.com; 704-541-9080 ext. 218    

 

 

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Pacini, Jessica DeLing

Social Butterflies™ social skills groups in Charlotte

Tuesday, Apr 7, 2015 by Child & Family Development

 

Two Social Butterflies Club™ social skills clubs are offered this summer at our Pineville office.   

BIRTHDAY PARTIES:  June 15-19

BACK TO SCHOOL: August 10-14

Objectives

The Club helps kids learn how to interact with peers while having fun with sensory and speech activities combined.   The kids in the group have a variety of diagnoses, such as expressive and/or receptive language problems, sensory processing difficulties, and fine motor deficits.  The goal is to teach the kids how to communicate with peers in a positive way.

Scheduling

Each child is screened before being placed into a group. The groups are formed based on each child’s communication skills, social ability and age.  Sessions are co-led by 1 Speech Therapist and 1 Occupational Therapist at the Pineville office.

The Club meets for four 1-hour sessions, Monday-Thursday. Kids can enroll and benefit from consecutive groups. 

Cost

The cost is $200.00.  Payment is due at the time of registration. 

Contact

Michelle Pentz

mpentz@childandfamilydevelopment.com

704-541-9080

Social Butterflies Club™ was founded in 2004 by Rhonda Osisek M.S., CCC-SLP in Virginia.  It is widely used across the country. Visit www.socialbutterfliesclub.com for more details. 

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Topics: Michelle Pentz, Courtney Stanley

Don't Take Our Word For It: accolades from a community colleague

Monday, Apr 6, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Collaborating with other community providers is a goal for all 34 therapists at Child and Family Development. 

Last week, a long-time colleague gave the ultimate professional compliment to Marion Wilm, OTR/L, occupational therapist at the Pineville office: 

"I think the world of Marion’s skills and often refer parents to her for occupational therapy." 

Read more about Marion's expertise on our blog.  

 

 

 

 

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Topics: Marion Wilm

Occupational Therapist approved: Noggin Stick developmental rattle

Friday, Apr 3, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Katie Haywood M.S., OTR/L, occupational therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, is always on the lookout for new toys that incorporate a variety of motor development and sensory features for her new baby boy (pictured below) and her occupational therapy clients.  

 

 

One of her favorites is Smart Noggin Noggin Stik by SmartNoggin, available at Smartnoggin™ and Amazon.  The Noggin Stik is described as a developmental rattle, along with a parent guide, to help parents begin their baby's learning journey. The rattle and parent guide help parents gain confidence in their ability to encourage their baby's brain development beginning at birth, with the hope of helping every baby reach their full potential. The features include lights, mirror, sound, textures, colors and easy grasp. 

 

                                                                                                                   

For more information about developmental milestones for infants, click here

Our team consists of 8 licensed occupational therapists, rather than assistants or aides.  We are in-network with many insurance plans, including Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield NC, Cigna, Medcost, North Carolina Medicaid, Primary Physician Care and United Health Care.  Our clients also may pay privately and access out-of-network benefits.

We provide home carryover suggestions, such as toy ideas, as part of every treatment plan.  

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Katie Haywood

Sensory Processing tips for Easter

Thursday, Apr 2, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Abbey Wash, MOT, OTR/L, occupational therapist at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, found a great resource from the Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) Foundation (www.spdfoundation.net) to help manage difficulties during Easter. 

They suggest:

 

 

  • Changes in routine can cause stress.  When there is a holiday and the normal daily routine is different, kids with SPD can have a difficult time.  
    • If you are attending church services, consider noise canceling headphones and a sensory backpack containing items most beneficial for your child's needs. It could be items that are soft and squishy or smooth or familiar.  
    • If going to a family event, let the child know ahead of time, bring a sensory backpack, and even look at pictures of who may be there.
  • Set specific limits with games in open spaces like Easter egg hunts or let the child opt out.
  • Choose comfortable clothing. 

 

Read more about how occupational therapy helps kids with sensory processing difficulties here

 

 

 

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist


 


 

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Topics: Abbey Wash