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Child & Family Development is a multi-disciplinary pediatric clinic serving the needs of Charlotte area children and their families.

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Contact

  • MIDTOWN OFFICE
  • 4012 Park Road, Suite 200
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.332.4834
  • PINEVILLE OFFICE
  • 10516 Park Road
  • Charlotte, NC
  • 704.541.9080

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General
The information contained in this website is intended to provide general educational information and client education on certain topics only and is not intended to offer healthcare/medical advice. This information should not be considered complete and should not be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice from a licensed healthcare professional. Child and Family Development is not liable or responsible for any advice, course of treatment, diagnosis or any other information or services you obtain through this website. If you have, or suspect you have, a health problem you should never disregard medical advice or delay seeking medical attention because of something you have read on this website. Never rely on information on this website in place of seeking professional medical advice. If you have questions about a medical condition or seek advice, see your healthcare professional immediately.

Links
Links from our website to other websites are provided as a service to help users find appropriate information. Absolutely no responsibility is taken by Child and Family Development or its employees for the accuracy of the information you may receive from any of the referred links. If you have questions about a medical condition or seek medical advice, contact your healthcare professional.

Child and Family Development offers aquatic therapy: handling and positioning benefits

Monday, Mar 30, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development has offered aquatic therapy for more than 10 years and our first 2015 block has just begun! 

Two physical therapists lead this specialty service, both of whom are certified by the Aquatic Therapy and Rehabilitation Institute (ATRI):  

Pool therapy is a great complement to traditional physical therapy and occupational therapy intervention. The water provides a number of unique properties that are almost impossible to replicate on land.  

One therapeutic benefit of treating in the pool is the properties of the water allow therapists to position patients for handling and manual work in ways not possible on land.

For the last 5 years, we have partnered with the Harris YMCA in Charlotte near South Park Mall.   The indoor pool has several features that are especially therapeutic including:

  • zero tide entrance, like walking into the ocean
  • whirlpool, with variable resistance and pressure 
  • heated water
  • floating equipment and toys 

Read additional posts about the benefits of aquatic therapy. 
Read the C&FD blog

Read More

Topics: Jessica Sapel, Erin Harkins

Counseling helps kids with developmental disabilities

Friday, Mar 27, 2015 by Child & Family Development

March is Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month!  Visit our blog each Friday of this month to read about some of these conditions and how Child and Family Development helps kids, adolescents and young adults reach their potential. 

The Center For Disease Control website offers excellent summaries and resources to learn more about developmental disabilities: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/developmentaldisabilities/facts.html.  

The CDC has information on specific conditions, such as Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).  ASD is a developmental disability that causes difficulties with communication, social, and play skills.  These skills are the building blocks for cooperation, perspective taking, and emotional processing and important for academic subjects that require understanding others, like reading comprehension, social studies, and history.  Deficits can range from mild to severe.  

Brandyn Street, Ph.D., is one of three psychologists here who specializes in the assessment and treatment of autism.  Dr. Street asserts that determining a diagnosis of ASD is an important step in deciding which skills need to be targeted for treatment.  If your child has difficulties making friends, sustaining a conversation, playing in an imaginative way, and is inflexible with routines, it is important to find out why and obtain supports to help. 

Our team consists of 6 licensed psychologists  We are in-network with many behavioral health insurance plans, including Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield NC and Primary Physician Care.  Our clients also may access out-of-network benefits or pay privately.  

Read more about our services for people with autism:

 

Visit our blog during April 2015 and be a part of autism awareness month! 

 

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Topics: Brandyn Street

speech therapy and Sequential Oral Sensory (SOS) Approach

Thursday, Mar 26, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Stephanie Gerlich, MS, CCC-SLP, speech therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, completed additional Sequential Oral Sensory (SOS) Approach training this month.  

SOS is a feeding approach for children who have trouble at mealtime.  This approach was founded by a child psychologist, Kay Tommey, PhD and a speech therapist, Erin Ross, PhD, CCC-SLP.  It stands for Sequential Oral Sensory Approach for Feeding.  Additional information is available on www.spdfoundation.net.

Stephanie approves of the approach that looks at the whole child in order to assess why a child is not eating or has a very limited diet.  Intervention then begins within a child’s comfort level and kids are allowed to explore and learn about food in a non-threatening way through play.  

If your child is a very picky eater or has a highly limited diet, consider scheduling a free phone Intake with a SOS trained speech therapist or occupational therapist at Child and Family Development to determine if an evaluation is recommended.

Read more about our SOS services here

Our team consists of 9 licensed speech therapists, rather than assistants or aides.  We are in-network with many insurance plans, including Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield NC, Cigna, Medcost, North Carolina Medicaid, Primary Physician Care and United Health Care.  Our clients also may pay privately and access out-of-network benefits.

  Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

 

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Topics: Stephanie Gerlich

The Family Clinic at Child and Family Development

Wednesday, Mar 25, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development partners with a child psychiatrist via The Family Clinic at our Midtown office. 

Since 2001, Dr. Geyer has led this collaboration and has broadened it’s scope to include not only children with ADD / ADHD, but also autism spectrum disorders, developmental disorders, anxiety, depression, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, and other emotional issues.

Pleas R. Geyer, M.D., is a child and adolescent psychiatrist who joined the Family Clinic at Child & Family Development to provide care and medication management of children and adolescents diagnosed with emotional and developmental disorders. Dr. Geyer is in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at Carolinas Medical Center, and is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Pediatrics at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. He received his medical degree from the Medical University of South Carolina. He completed his psychiatry residency at the University of Chicago, where he was Chief Resident in Psychiatry. He also completed his Fellowship in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the University of Chicago in 1981. Additionally, Dr. Geyer has trained at the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis. He brings a depth of experience in his treatment of our child and adolescent population. Dr. Geyer is board certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology in General Psychiatry, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and Forensic Psychiatry. Currently, he serves as a member of the Executive Committee of the North Carolina Council of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, the North Carolina chapter of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

There is no waiting list for services.  Call 704-332-4834 for more information.  

To learn more about The Family Clinic, click here

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Topics: Pleas Geyer

Child and Family Development Midtown office

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development is celebrating 8 years at our Midtown office this month! 

The space is a reflection of our team.  It is inviting, casual and family-friendly. We want you to feel welcome and comfortable. Our lobby is large and comfortable and the Client Services team is ready to greet you.  The therapy rooms are bright and private.  We’ve found the balance of a professional office and an enjoyable place for all.

We occupy the second floor of the building, including 7000 square feet space of:

  • 3 physical therapy offices
  • 4 occupational therapy offices
  • 5 speech therapy offices 
  • 3 psychology offices
  • 1 education office

The office is located at 4012 Park Road.  It is across the street from Park Road Shopping Center, about 3 miles from South Park Mall and 4 miles from Uptown Charlotte. 

Click here to learn more about Child and Family Development.  

Click here to sign up for  C&FD NEWS

 

 

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Child and Family Development offers aquatic therapy: balance benefits

Monday, Mar 23, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development has offered aquatic therapy for more than 10 years and our first 2015 block has just begun! 

Two physical therapists lead this specialty service, both of whom are certified by the Aquatic Therapy and Rehabilitation Institute (ATRI):  

Pool therapy is a great complement to traditional physical therapy and occupational therapy intervention. The water provides a number of unique properties that are almost impossible to replicate on land.  

One balance benefit of treating in the pool is the buoyancy and pressure of the water allow for increased support to remain upright.  Thus, the water provides increased stability and gives a longer period of time for learning righting responses.

For the last 5 years, we have partnered with the Harris YMCA in Charlotte near South Park Mall.   The indoor pool has several features that are especially therapeutic including:

  • zero tide entrance, like walking into the ocean
  • whirlpool, with variable resistance and pressure 
  • heated water
  • floating equipment and toys 

Read future posts about more benefits of aquatic therapy. 
Read the C&FD blog

Read More

Topics: Jessica Sapel, Erin Harkins

Physical therapy helps kids with developmental disabilities

Friday, Mar 20, 2015 by Child & Family Development

March is Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month!  Visit our blog each Friday of this month to read about some of these conditions and how Child and Family Development helps kids, adolescents and young adults reach their potential. 

The Center For Disease Control website offers excellent summaries and resources to learn more about developmental disabilities: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/developmentaldisabilities/facts.html.  

The CDC has information on specific conditions, such as Cerebral Palsy.  Cerebral Palsy is caused by damage to the developing brain and is the most common motor impairment in children.  There are four main classifications of Cerebral Palsy, spastic, ataxic, dyskinetic and mixed.  Read more here.

Jessica Braun, DPT offers physical therapy assessments and treatment to kids, teens and young adults with Cerebral Palsy.  Jessica shares that her job as a PT is to improve strength, flexibility and overall mobility.  

Our team consists of 6 licensed physical therapists, rather than assistants or aides.  We are in-network with many insurance plans, including Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield NC, Cigna, Medcost, North Carolina Medicaid, Primary Physician Care and United Health Care.  Our clients also may pay privately and access out-of-network benefits.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Physical Therapist

 

 

 

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Topics: Jessica Braun

C&FD celebrates with speech therapist, Michelle Pentz

Thursday, Mar 19, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Michelle Pentz marks 7 years at Child and Family Development this month! She is a speech therapist at the Pineville office.  

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Michelle loves the variety and diversity at C&FD. She provides speech therapy services to people of all ages, ranging from someone under 12 months to over 20 years.  She  works with children with rare syndromes as well as kids with mild articulation or language difficulties.  The benefit is a well rounded therapist who can approach every case with intent and enthusiasm.    

She enjoys the multidisciplinary approach at Child and Family Development.  Michelle takes advantage of working under the same roof as other professionals.  She often talks with an occupational therapist or physical therapist.  For example, she has a client who stutters and was talking with the mother about related anxiety.  The open discussion led to one of the psychologists providing some support and collaborating with Michelle to help this child.  

Michelle strives to fulfill our mission of comprehensive and integrated care and we appreciate it! 

Happy C&FD Anniversary!

Read more about speech therapy services here.  

Want to learn more about our team? 

Sign up for C&FD News

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Topics: Michelle Pentz

addressing anxiety in occupational therapy

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Kati Berlin, MS, OTR/L, occupational therapist at the Pineville office of Child and Family Development, completed expanded training titled “Anxiety Disorders in Children & Adolescents, Recognizing & Treating the Emerging Epidemic”.

Kati learned more about types of anxiety that are prevalent in childhood and adolescents, including techniques for managing it.  Concepts include self-regulation, self-calming strategies, breathing techniques, yoga, activities of interest, mindfulness and others.  She plans to apply this knowledge to her work, especially as a part of sensory processing intervention.  

Read more about sensory processing here

Our OT team consists of 8 licensed occupational therapists, rather than assistants or aides.  We are in-network with many insurance plans, including Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield NC, Cigna, Medcost, North Carolina Medicaid, Primary Physician Care and United Health Care.  Our clients also may pay privately and access out-of-network benefits.

 

 

  Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

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Topics: Kati Berlin

kids, working memory and Cogmed

Tuesday, Mar 17, 2015 by Child & Family Development

What is working memory?

Working memory is a critical brain function because it provides a “mental scratchpad” on which we hold information while mentally engaged in other related activities. Working memory weaknesses are found in many conditions, such as ADHD, learning disabilities, traumatic brain injury, autism spectrum disorders, anxiety disorders, and others.

How do I know if my child has a weakness with working memory?

Here are some indicators of working memory difficulties: 

  • When given three things to do, remembers only the first or last.
  • Has a short attention span.
  • Has trouble concentrating on chores, schoolwork, etc.
  • Is easily distracted by noises, activity, sights, etc.
  • Has trouble with chores or tasks that have more than one step.
  • Needs help from an adult to stay on task.
  • Forgets what he/she is doing.
  • When sent to get something, forgets what he/she is supposed to get.
  • Has trouble finishing tasks (chores, homework).
  • Has trouble remembering things, even for a few minutes.

What can I do to improve my child’s working memory?

The Cogmed Working Memory Training Program has been developed for children and adults and consists of a specific set of working memory tasks that are performed on a computer, five days a week over five weeks. The tasks continually adjusted to match the individual’s performance and as a result, individuals are consistently challenged to perform at their highest possible level. Results from several research studies indicate that systematic training of working memory with Cogmed can improve cognitive performance, including improved attention, better complex reasoning skills, and better ability to organize and multi-task.

To determine if Cogmed is right for your child, schedule an appointment with Joy Granetz, child psychologist and Qualified Cogmed Coach. She is based at our Pineville office. 

Read more about Cogmed here

 

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Topics: Joy Granetz

Child and Family Development offers aquatic therapy: sensory benefits

Monday, Mar 16, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Child and Family Development has offered aquatic therapy for more than 10 years and our first 2015 block has just begun! 

Two physical therapists lead this specialty service, both of whom are certified by the Aquatic Therapy and Rehabilitation Institute (ATRI):  

Pool therapy is a great complement to traditional physical therapy and occupational therapy intervention. The water provides a number of unique properties that are almost impossible to replicate on land.  

One sensory benefit of treating in the pool is the deep pressure input that is provided by the hydrostatic pressure of the water against all of the submerged body.  Not only does this increase awareness of the body, but it is calming too.

For the last 5 years, we have partnered with the Harris YMCA in Charlotte near South Park Mall.   The indoor pool has several features that are especially therapeutic including:

  • zero tide entrance, like walking into the ocean
  • whirlpool, with variable resistance and pressure 
  • heated water
  • floating equipment and toys 

Read future posts about more benefits of aquatic therapy. 
Read the C&FD blog

Read More

Topics: Jessica Sapel, Erin Harkins

Speech therapy helps kids with developmental disabilities

Friday, Mar 13, 2015 by Child & Family Development

March is Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month!  Visit our blog each Friday of this month to read about some of these conditions and how Child and Family Development helps kids, adolescents and teens reach their potential. 

The Center For Disease Control website offers excellent summaries and resources to learn more about developmental disabilities: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/developmentaldisabilities/facts.html.  

The CDC has information on specific conditions, such as Angelman Syndrome.  It is a genetic disorder in which a gene on chromosome 15 is missing or unexpressed. Children with Angelman Syndrome typically have developmental delays that are frequently evident between 6-12 months of age.Diagnosis can be established through genetic and DNA testing as early as the first year of life.  In affected children, language comprehension and non-verbal skills are usually more developed than spoken language and the affected child may have few if any words. Children with Angelman Syndrome have difficulties with movement and balance.  Their behavior may combine frequent laughter and smiling, an easily excitable personality, hand flapping movements, hyperactive behavior, and a short attention span.  Associated physical features and concerns, such as seizures, movement problems, hypo pigmentation, sleep and feeding problems, are present in about 20-80% of children who have this disorder. Many educational and behavioral interventions have been shown to be effective in addition to physical and occupational therapies, speech and language interventions, behavior modification, and parent training. Read more here.

Michelle Pentz, MS, CCC-SLP, offers speech therapy assessments and treatment to kids and teens with Angelman Syndrome and other syndromes that affect expressive language skills.  Michelle shares that her job as a SLP is to ensure a way for a child to communicate with others.  This can be done with a total language approach (a combination of speech production, sign language, augmentative communication, etc.).  Children with Angelman Syndrome tend to have good comprehension and nonverbal skills, so building on the nonverbal skills will be the ideal method to go about obtaining more communication with others

Our team of 8 speech therapists provides expertise in many areas, including expressive language, receptive language, feeding difficulties, swallowing difficulties, auditory processing difficulties, articulation, phonemic awareness, phonological awareness, voice and fluency. 

Child and Family Development is in-network with many insurance plans, including Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield NC, Cigna, Medcost, North Carolina Medicaid, Primary Physician Care and United Health Care.  Our clients also may pay privately and access out-of-network benefits.

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Speech Therapist

 

 

Read More

Topics: Michelle Pentz

IEP Meetings: after the meeting

Thursday, Mar 12, 2015 by Child & Family Development

In North Carolina, most public schools manage an Individualize Education Plan (IEP) for elementary, middle and high school students via a standard process.  There are many resources available to parents including the Exceptional Children's Assistance Center Parent Training & Information Center

At Child and Family Development, Mary "Mo" Froneberger and the other Educational Specialists can help parents make the most of an IEP meeting, based on their professional experiences in local public schools and working knowledge of the system.  

Mary is finishing up a blog series that offers some suggestions, including what to do after the IEP meeting, based on the ECAC.

FOLLOW UP:  Await copies of all applicable records and request again if you don't receive them in a timely manner.  Share the information with others involved with your child, especially teachers and therapists (speech therapists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, tutors, psychologists, etc.). Periodically review the IEP and compare actions to the plan to ensure progress.  Do not hesitate to contact the school representatives with questions.  

Connect with our Educators directly if you have questions about the IEP process by calling 704-541-9080.  

Read more about our educational assessment and support services here

 

Read More

Topics: Mary Froneberger

Join us tomorrow, March 12 for a free seminar: Children & Social Media

Wednesday, Mar 11, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Five spots remain for tomorrow's free seminar: Children & Social Media

Need some strategies to help your child navigate the online world? 

Devon Redmond, PhD will share the basics about some popular social media sites, including Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, Tumblr, Vine, Twitter, and Ask.Fm.  

Dr. Redmond is a licensed psychologist providing assessment and therapy for children and adolescents.   Her focuses include ADHD, learning disorders and developmental delays, with an emphasis on autism spectrum disorders. She strives to help her clients capitalize on strengths and build upon weaknesses. She helps school-age children and teens to manage issues such as ADHD, anxiety and depression.  One passion is working with teenage girls to build self-esteem, improve relationships with family and friends, navigate transitions and life changes, enhance communication skills and target academic and organizational issues. 

This event is primarily for parents and caregivers of kids age 10 years and up.  

Event Details: 

Thursday, March 12, 2015 

6:15-7:15 PM 

Child and Family Development- Midtown office

4012 Park Road, Suite 200

Charlotte, NC  28209

Space is limited so RSVP to reserve your spot: http://goo.gl/pYq6z6 

 

Sign up for C&FD News

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Topics: Devon Redmond

Learning disabilities: 10 warning signs during school years

Tuesday, Mar 10, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Our psychologists and educators can help children, teens and young adults with learning disabilities through comprehensive assessment and goal-directed support.  

There are some classic warning signs of a learning disability during the school years:

  1. Oral reading is slow or labored
  2. Reads with substitutions, adds words or guesses at words
  3. Poor decoding skills (not able to properly “sound out a word”)
  4. Poor spelling skills (often individuals with dyslexia will spell words correctly on a spelling test ,but are not able to generalize into other day-to-day writing assignments)
  5. Poor fine motor skills
  6. Poor handwriting
  7. Trouble with recall or retrieval of math facts, especially quick retrieval
  8. Writes or reads letters and/or numbers reversed
  9. Doesn't enjoy reading
  10. Doesn't enjoy writing

Learning disabilities, and specifically dyslexia, impact approximately 20% of the population. The NC and SC public school systems have resources in special education to identify individuals with learning disabilities however, procedures and guidelines are such that most children are not identified with learning disorders until 2nd or 3rd grade and in order to be identified their delays must be significantly impacting their educational performance. Therefore, many children with mild delays simply “fall through the cracks” as their mild delays turn into moderate and severe delays without appropriate intervention. Research indicates the children make the greatest gains in learning to read in grades K through 2nd. Research has also shown that if the reading gap is not remediated by the 3rd grade, it is very hard to close. Therefore, it is imperative that professionals in the medical field collaborate with parents and educators to help identify individuals with learning disabilities.

Talk with a pediatrician or teacher if you have concerns.  They may recommend psycho-educational evaluation.  

Learn more about services school-age children with signs of a learning disability at Child and Family Development here.  

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Topics: Aleksandra Liss, Gretchen Hunter, Chris Vrabel, Joy Granetz, Mary Froneberger, Marie Pacini, Jessica DeLing, Brandyn Street, Devon Redmond

C&FD celebrates with client accounts lead, Mary Johnson

Monday, Mar 9, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Mary Johnson marks 7 years at Child and Family Development this month! If we don't include her break, then she would be closer to 25 years! She is the client accounts lead, supporting all of Child and Family Development and our clients.

Mary has rolled with the changes over time, from paper claims and phone calls to electronic submissions and online communications.  She excels (ha!, that is math humor) at her work because of her love of numbers and dedication to keeping our finanical records clean and current. 

We've had the pleasure of seeing Mary and her family grow up over time.  Her daughters have gone from preschoolers to graduates.  Mary says C&FD is part of her family too. 

Happy C&FD Anniversary!

FullSizeRender

Read more about insurance and how we help families manage their pediatric therapy services here.  

Want to learn more about our team? 

Sign up for C&FD News

Read More

March is Developmental Disabilities Month!

Friday, Mar 6, 2015 by Child & Family Development

March is Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month!  Visit our blog each Friday of this month to read about some of these conditions and how Child and Family Development helps kids, adolescents and teens reach their potential. 

Read More

IEP Meetings: during the meeting

Thursday, Mar 5, 2015 by Child & Family Development

In North Carolina, most public schools manage an Individualize Education Plan (IEP) for elementary, middle and high school students via a standard process.  There are many resources available to parents including the Exceptional Children's Assistance Center Parent Training & Information Center

At Child and Family Development, Mary "Mo" Froneberger and the other Educational Specialists can help parents make the most of an IEP meeting, based on their professional experiences in local public schools and working knowledge of the system.  

Mary is starting a blog series that offers some suggestions, including what to do during the IEP meeting, based on the ECAC.

PARTICIPATE:  Bring talking points and records, as well as a pen and paper so you can take notes. Introduce yourself and make sure you know everyone there.  Share your ideas and opinions constructively and listen to others.    Before the meeting ends, request written minutes, schedule another meeting as needed, sign any necessary documents and request copies of all applicable documents.  

Connect with our Educators directly if you have questions about the IEP process by calling 704-541-9080.  

Read more about our educational assessment and support services here

Be on the lookout for the next blog which will include suggestions on what to do after an IEP meeting.

 

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Topics: Mary Froneberger

President's Point Of View: planning ahead for summer

Wednesday, Mar 4, 2015 by Child & Family Development

Pam Jones is the President of Child and Family Development. Here, she shares her personal experience and strategy for planning summer activities for her kids.  

As a mother of 2 boys, I know how much time and effort is required to plan for meaningful and fun summer activities.  

Here at Child and Family Development, we encourage parents to instill a love for learning in their children, not only during school months but even in the summer. 

 We often offer specialty services during the summer months that cater to a family's busy and changing schedule around camps, vacations and other important commitments (like pool time).  

In particular, our Educational Specialists customize many services during the summer with one main goal in mind:  "for all students to become independent life-long learners and gain control of their present and future academic careers”.

Mary "Mo" Froneberger, Jessica DeLing and Marie Pacini can help improve: 

  • Reading and spelling accuracy and fluency
  • Information processing to strengthen oral/reading comprehension and verbal/written expression
  • Study skills
  • Test-taking skills
  • Executive functioning skills

Follow our blog to learn more about the individual and group programs for the summer.  

Want to get regular updates about C&FD?

Sign up for C&FD News

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Topics: Mary Froneberger, Marie Pacini, Jessica DeLing, Pam Jones

Our Occupational Therapists know "Kids Who Feel Too Much"

Tuesday, Mar 3, 2015 by Child & Family Development

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Melissa Petcu, MS, OTR/L, an occupational therapy team member at the Midtown office of Child and Family Development, was captivated by the title of a recent story in Parent Magazine, "Kids Who Feel Too Much".        

This article describes some classic characteristics of children who seem overly sensitive to the environment-- whether it is sound, touch, light or related to another sense. 

Sensory sensitivities are common in children with autism. Melissa reminds us that the opposite is not true. Just because a child has difficulty processing certain sensory input does not mean that the child has autism. Formal evaluation from an occupational therapist and can determine sensory processing skills and an evaluation from an ADOS-trained psychologist can determine if an ASD (autism spectrum disorder) diagnosis applies.  

Read more about Melissa's take on sensory processing on our blog here

 

Melissa and the 7 other licensed occupational therapists on our team are available to share their expertise.  

Have a question about developmental milestones? 704-541-9080 Call to schedule a free phone consultation with a  Occupational Therapist

 

 

 

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Topics: Melissa Petcu